Skip to main content

Full text of "Building with assurance"

See other formats


mm 






j^. 



f 



r' 



SI 




IWTERNATIQNAL 



Digitized by 

The Association for Preservation Technology International 

For the 

Building Technology Heritage Library 






BVILDING 



AVITH 



ASSVRANCE 



0^^ 



j^ 



This Copy of 

"Building With Assurance" 

is registered in our records under 

No .2469 _ 

and should not be mutilated 



In referring to a design merely mention 

the illustration number and 

page number. 



Copyright, 1921, by 

Morgan Woodwork Organization 

All Rights Reserved 



Warehouses Factory Warehouses 

Morgan Sash and Door Co. Morgan Company Morgan Millwork Co. 
Chicago— Detroit Oshkosh, Wis. Baltimore — Jersey City 

Sawmill Operations 
Foster City, Mich. Grin, Wash. Forrest City, Ark. 

Sales Offices 
Cleveland New York City Atlanta 



^^^ ^"^^ 



,»^" 



\ 



w 



Home 

HOME reflects character. More, it moulds character. Home is the image of thought, 
exposed, inviting the gaze of the world. As your home is, so are you. Then make 
your home as you want to be— in good taste, dignified, ennobling, to be admired. But see 
to it that it is also beautiful, comfortable and durable. 

Home charm^ is not measured in dollars and cents— selection is more potent than expen- 
diture in its achievement. It is surprising how inexpensively beauty, comfort and durability 
can be built into homes with the right kind of woodwork. 

Somewhere in these pages is a design which peculiarly expresses your individuality. May 
the finding of your choice multiply the pleasure of the search. 



Eminent Authorities 

Whose Enthusiastic Co-operation 

Made This Book Possible 

Angell, Rose, Writer on Home Economics 

Berkey & Gay Furniture Co. 

CORBIN, P. & F. 

Crane Co., The 

DuPoNT DE Nemours, E. I. & Co. 
'* Good Furniture ' ' Magazine 

Hardwood Flooring Manufacturers' Ass'n 

Macbeth-Evans Glass Co. 

Marshall Field & Co. 

Standard Sanitary Manufacturing Co. 
"The Touchstone" Magazine 

AN INDEX to the special articles by these 
^^ experts is printed on pages 405-406-407. 
They comprise a wealth of practical information 
in detail on Flooring, Painting Exteriors, Finishing 
Interiors, Builder's Hardware, Heating, Lighting, 
Plumbing, Landscape Gardening, Color Harmony 
in Home Furnishing, Selection of Furniture, Rugs, 
Curtains, Draperies, etc.. Care of Woodwork to 
insure lasting beauty and low depreciation, and 
many other subjects of importance to home 
builders and remodelers. 



^ ' (^ 



"Building With Assurance" 



^gUILDING WITH ASSURANCE" answers all the 
perplexing questions that stand between you and 
your ideal home. 

It will guide you safely and pleasantly through your 
whole interesting building operation, from the selection 
of a suitable type of house down to the furnishing of 
each room. 

Imagine yourself leisurely rambling through the dozen 
or more homes that you have admired and coveted most 
of all — whose soul-satisfying perfection is indelibly stamped 
on your memory. Then you will know the quality of the 
entertainment that beckons to you from the pages of this 
book. 

Every turn of a leaf discloses refreshing surprises — 
glimpses of home charm of such allurement as must have 
inspired John Howard Payne to write his immortal 
"Home, Sweet Home." 

And, best of all, these suggestions are as sensible and 
as practical as they are beautiful. 

Only to read (on page 4) the names of the concerns 
and individuals who labored sincerely and conscientiously 
to give you the benefit of their rich experience in home- 
making is proof sufficient of the worth of this encyclo- 
pedia of home information. 



"S ' ^ 




"H ' ^ 



: 



A Woman's Thoughts 
About a Home 

By Rose Angell 

until recently Department Editor of Woman's World 



"A Book of Verses underneath the bough, 
A jug of Wine, a loaf of Bread, and Thou 
Beside me, singing in the Wilderness, 
Ah! Wilderness were Paradise enow." 

— Omar. 



TN EVERY clime, at all times, the innermost 
^ heart of man and maid cries out for a home 
— *'the place where we rest/' 

To most of us at some period in our lives 
comes the opportunity for planning a Home— 
the beloved and sacred spot which will be our 
shelter — and another's — from the cares of the 
outside world, where we can gain strength and 
purpose to carry us through our tomorrows. 

None of Life's pleasures will bring us purer, 
simpler joy than this, the task of planning 
surroundings that will be at once beautiful, 
simple and convenient: beautiful with grace of 
style and attractiveness of material; simple 
with lines that rest and charm the eye; con- 
venient in that they are designed to save 
effort, strength and labor, by conforming to 
an ideal of true efficiency. 

The first question to be decided is the style 
of home we prefer. Then the amount we can 
profitably spend thereon must be definitely 
fixed. Do we prefer a neat, compact two-story 
house, or a one-story residence in more ram- 
bling style? Does the Dutch type, with man- 
sard roof, appeal to us, or the pure Colonial, 
with its tall white pillars? Do we prefer a 
quaint California bungalow, or a villa in com- 
posite modern design? The decision is an im- 
portant one, and the question of suitability to 
our chosen building site must not be forgotten. 

The general plan of our future home once 
settled, the stability and worth of the frame- 
work insured by choice of a competent archi- 
tect, the construction vouched for by a reliable 
contractor, and ourselves fully assured of get- 
ting just what we specify from a dealer of 



good reputation whom we know we can trust, 
most of us will happen on the discovery that 
four-fifths of the beauty of our Home depends 
upon the woodwork. 

Think of the numerous items which are com- 
prehended under that unassuming term **mill- 
work," and how much of the appearance of our 
Home will depend upon its artistry and worth ! 
There is the portico, the entrance, the porches, 
the doors, the windows, the colonnades, the 
cozy corners, the stairways, the enduring 
furniture— in fact, everything which makes a 
real Home out of a mere shell of frame work 
and girders. And each of these details must 
be chosen harmoniously and well. 

The Entrance 

In planning the ideal Home, first let us con- 
sider the shape and style of 
the entrance — that 
feature which gives 
the arriving guests 
their first impres- 
sion. A beautiful 
doorway speaks its 
welcome and tells 
its own tale of the 
hospitality within. 

Everyone is 
familiar with 
the imposing 
type of en- 
trance char- '^^-^% 
acteristic ^'^'' 

of Colonial days; 
the pediment-and 



^x^^ 




^ ^ ^ 




^=^^ ^ 



portico style typical of Southern architec- 
ture, where tall pillars reaching to the height 
of the second story support a substantial 
entablature with angled roof, the whole form- 
ing a practical covered way before the front 
door. 

While the Colonial portico is perhaps too 
dominating for the smaller home, one of the 
leading fashions of today is no less Colonial in 
its inception. Perhaps we should say ''Greek,'' 
for some of the most beautiful and simple door- 
ways of Colonial times are purely Hellenic in 
form and type. 

The supporting columns of the porticos con- 
form strictly to the ideals of those Greek archi- 
tects who gave us graceful columns with their 
simple Doric, scrolled Ionic, and elaborately 
carved Corinthian capitals. Those perfect pro- 
portions the eye of man has found impossible 
of improvement to this day. 

The Tuscan column, a plain rounded pillar, 
is very popular and is typical of the mingled 
simplicity and strength which won for the 
ancient Roman the empire of his world. 

Where pillars are used, it is well to remember 
that their proportions must be architecturally 
correct and the skillful designer of millwork 
will always take this point into consideration. 

The simple, white paint- 
ed, panelled Colonial \ 
door was most often 
surmounted by a semi- 
circular transom, known 
as a *'fan- 
light*^ or ' ' 




**sunburst," with the panes sometimes leaded 
in quite intricate designs. ' Then glass panels 
were not seen as often as they are today, and 
side lights were rare. 

Today, with our ever-increasing love of all 
outdoors, the more light we get, the better 
we like it. In some instances the upper half of 
the door consists of a single clear sheet of 
glass, while the lower half is wood panelled, 
thus giving us a view of the flowers and foliage 
which greet us from our own dooryard^ as well 
as furnishing a very practical means of lighting 
the hallway, which sometimes proved a difficult 
problem. 

Other doors are patterned after those which 
look over gardens, the woodwork is merely a 
frame holding in place transparent panes of 
crystal. 

The Vestibule 

Where the doorway leads into a room instead 
of directly into the hall, a vestibule is almost 
indispensable, especially in those parts of the 
country where overshoes, fur coats and um- 
brellas are necessities for a part of the year at 
least. With a low built-in hall seat on one side, 
its hinged top opening on a convenient recep- 
tacle for rubbers, overshoes, roller skates, (and 
what not!), and above this a convenient mir- 
ror set into a panel of the wall, opposite an um- 
brella stand and a row of pegs for caps and 
sweaters, and with a wire mat and an inexpen- 
sive rug on the floor, your vestibule will be 
furnished. 

Of course, however convenient and well- 
intentioned the vestibule is but a substitute 
for the hall proper, and more and more are 
people choosing that type of house which has 
a hall from which the more important recep-- 
tion rooms radiate. Where privacy is desired, 
the hallway is invaluable as a means of com- 
munication between the different parts of the 
house, as each room may be completely shut 
off from the others. With small families this 
is perhaps unnecessary, and here the owner 
must exercise his or her individual taste. 

The Hall 

An ideal hall is one which forms an imposing 
unit with the staircase, that rises from it and 
with which it is intimately connected. 



10 



^z^^ 



Reproductions of Colonial hallways are much 
in vogue at present and the combination of 
white enamelled panels and mahoganized rails 
and skirting is both striking and delightful, es- 
pecially if the staircase carries out the idea, 
with rich red in handrail, newel post and 
treads, and cream white balusters, uprights and 
side panelling. 

How many staircases appear to have been 
designed merely as a means of ascending to the 
upper story. The stairway may be (and should 
be) made one of the interesting features of 
the Home. 

Three types of stairways are found practical 
in the modern home — the straight flight, 
the curved, and the platform or landing 
staircase. 

With the first we are all familiar. The long, 
narrow hall seems to demand the straight 
Colonial flight, and for this the ideal choice is 
white woodwork and mahoganized handrail 
with slender balusters. 

The curved staircase, a development of the 
early spiral stair, though graceful, depends 
for its successful treatment upon the design 
and proportion of the curves, 
which demand the skill 
of the most exper- 
ienced handrailer. 

The "platform^' :}^y^- - , 

staircase has a 
charm of its 







own. The landing which is generally placed 
halfway up the flight suggests repose. If this 
landing can be placed beneath a window, and 
a window seat arranged, the effect will be 
heightened. 

One important point to remember is that 
the- most satisfactory stairways are built with 
wide treads and low risers, forming what 
are known as ''shallow'' stairs. The effort 
of ascending is lessened as the height of 
the riser decreases. 

The Living Room 

The living room as we know it today is 
essentially a product of modern American 
family life. It is the room where the several 
members of the family meet to sit, sew, read, 
and carry on that part of their daily intercourse 
which all hold in common and in its truest aspect 
it will reflect more or less the individuality of 
each member of the family. A freak room is 
out of place and will not attain its true end. 
This should be the most democratic room in 
the house, its message ''Comfort and Cheer." 

The Window Seat 

Wide, low windows suggest the built-in 
window seat with soft, upholstered cushions, 
and a handy magazine stand nearby, covered 
with the latest magazines and books. This 
may be used as a resting place, or by placing 
the cushions and draperies in the box, (of 
which the window seat is merely a cover), we 
have the most convenient stand possible for 
those decorative vases of flowers, the pot or 
two of ferns, or one of those flowering plants, 
without which no homelike living room is 
worthy of its name. 

Since the low radiator has been used, some* 
wise folk have devised a method of making 
this usually unsightly object a thing of beauty 
by enclosing it with wooden covers and thus 
giving it additional usefulness as a seat. 

French Doors 

The average Home will be made doubly 
attractive if French doors are used between 
all the rooms on the ground floor, with the 
exception of the kitchen. For the bedrooms, 
privacy naturally demands doors of the usual 
wood panel pattern. 



12 



^^ 




13 



^^'-^ ^ 







The Mantel 

The fireplace naturally will 
be the leading feature of 
every well planned living 
room, and on its grace 
and symmetry a great 
deal of the beauty of 
the room depends. 
Heavy fireplaces 
and mantels of 
brick, over- 
mantels of 
oak elabor- 
ately carv- 
ed , and 
m a r b 1 e 
man t el- 
pieces of 
stiff Victor- 
ian style, all 
have had 
their peri- 
ods of pop- ■ 
ularity, but nothing is better suited to the 
pretty, modern American home than the over- 
mantel of wood with plain frieze and architrave 
and simple cornice. 

For the lining of the fireplace, brick may be 
used, but tiling, with its polished red or yellow 
surfaces, its quick light reflections, has 
always seemed to possess charm. 

The Dining Room 

A style of interior decoration which 
has seldom been improved upon for the dining 
room is that in which the woodwork becomes 
the leading feature of the room. Here beautiful 
panelling suggests itself, with the wood show- 
ing the grain in all its native beauty. Much 
of course depends on the situation of the 
room and its relationship to the rest of the 
house. More expensive at first than wall- 
paper or one of the other popular finishes, in 
the end it will save its cost over and over 
again, as it is practically indestructible, and 
unlike any other decoration, its beauty and 
worth increase as the years go by. 

The panelling usually covers the walls to 
two-thirds of their height, with a wide plate 
rail above. That part of the walls above the 
plate rail may be papered in one of the rich 



red or dull orange papers which form so excel- 
lent a foil for the dusky beauty of the wood. 

The built-in sideboard will always appeal to 
the man or woman with a keen sense of the 
fitness of things. There must be plenty of 
drawers for the silver and table linen which 
are in constant use and for those precious 
lace-trimmed doilies and elaborate center- 
pieces which are not the least of every good 
housewife's treasures. 

In its general design, the sideboard should 
accord with the rest of the woodwork, and 
material and finish, size and shape of mould- 
ings, should be identical. Even the glass 
doors should be in keeping. 

A clever contrivance, which will meet with 
the unqualified approval of the housekeeper, 
is a small sliding panel in the built-in buffet, 
or in the wall. This gives direct access to 
the kitchen, and is a real little labor saver. 

The Breakfast Nook 

Another device which is becoming more and 
more popular in these servantless days, is a 
breakfast nook, where both breakfast and 
luncheon may be served. In the morning, a 
few steps from the range take you into the 
delightful little alcove — just wide enough to 
hold a long, narrow table and two seats. 
What a saving of time and labor not to have 
to set the dining room table for the quick 
breakfast or for the cup 
of tea when the cheery ; ; , 

neighbor steps in around 
four o'clock. 

The breakfast 
nook should be 
bright, sunny and 
cheerful, or it will 
fail in its mission. 






The Library 
or Den 

This is dis- 
tinctly the 
domain of 
the man of 
the house. 
Here, sur- 
rounded by 
his books and 




=^ ^" ^ 







=^^^ ^ 




. v?Ti:f' papers, he can read and 

- ;T "' ' smoke. He will like dark, 

rather plain surroundings, 
with a strongly contrasting note of color, and 
with nine men out of ten the favorite color 
is red. The sensible woman will leave the choice 
of arrangement to him whose retreat it is to be. 

The Bookcase 

A fireplace in the library, flanked on either 
side by built-in bookcases covering the entire 
side of the wall, is both a comfort and an adorn- 
ment. A comfortable chair on each side of 
the hearth, well chosen lights, and the wisdom 
of the ages within touch of the outstretched 
hand. Let us house these good friends of ours 
safely, for when the long winter evenings come 
we shall find the hours spent in the library some 
of the happiest and most fruitful of our lives. 

The Bedrooms 

The cretonnes and gaily decorated chintzes 
which have governed bedroom styles for 
several years cry aloud for a background of 
plain white woodwork as a foil for their 
brilliance. Hence, for our bedrooms, white 
woodwork is first in favor. It has the three- 
fold advantage of being bright, dainty in 
effect, and if a good enamelled finish is used, 
easy to keep clean. 



Imagine the dainty bedroom of Milady 
with white woodwork, cream walls, and low 
cushioned window seat, patterned after the 
one in the living room below. It should 
have a large closet with built-in shelves and 
drawers and mirror door. Lives there a 
woman who won't appreciate seeing how 
she looks, from the tips of her shoes to a 
final pat or twist at her hair, before considering 
her toilet complete? 

A carefully chosen suite of furniture in 
our pet period style, a couple of good rugs on 
the hardwood floor, and our bedroom is 
complete. 

The Bathroom 

In most homes the bathroom gets hardest 
usage and usually, unless it is planned with 
the utmost simplicity, it is difficult to keep 
spotlessly clean and attractive. 

A way to eliminate dust-harboring corners 
and inaccessible floor surfaces is to have 
the bath built in an alcove in the wall. This 
removes it from the room itself and is a good 
way to dispose of its cumbersome presence. 
A plain washable curtain hanging from a bar 
near the ceiling will screen it from the rest 
of the room and give one an additional feeling 
of privacy. 

Built-in cupboards 
whose tops provide 
plenty of table surface 
afford convenient room 
for soaps, shaving 
utensils, tooth brushes, 
and the various toilet 
accessories of each 
member of the 
family. The ; 

built-in medi- 
cine cupboard, 
too, may 
well have 
its place 
in the 
bathroom 
to hold the 
few simple ,,- 
remedies 
for cuts, 
burns, etc. 




=^ '' ^ 




^K^^j-.-^-^ ,'^'^$v'2:^-cr tt-T^'^rJ-;*^'^^ 



A large mirror, placed under a good light, 
preferably between two windows, and a small 
triple mirror which will fold into the wall, 
for use when shaving, should not be forgotten, 
while a wide shelf beneath the large mirror 
may serve as a dressing table at need. 

The preferred color scheme for the bathroom 
is pale blue or soft green painted walls with 
high tiled wainscoting below, but the woodwork 
should be white, reflecting purity and sanitation. 
The bathroom de luxe may have tiling on 
the floor and walls, but most of us will be 
satisfied with a light wood floor which will 
form a pleasing background to the one or two 
small, washable rugs that harmonize with the 
tiled wainscoting and painted walls. 

The Linen Closet 

The linen closet should have many narrow 
shelves, set close together, so that each article 
may be easily found and removed without 
disturbing a dozen others in the search. 
Shallow drawers will hold the more treasured 
pieces and give them better protection than 
is needed for the sheets and towels which 
are in everyday use. 

This linen closet can be built into a con- 
venient wall space and is correctly located 
near, or in, the bathroom, where fresh towels 
and washcloths will always be near at hand. 



The Linen Chute 

In conjunction with the linen closet we 
often find the linen chute, built in the wall 
and reaching to the laundry in the basement, 
down which the soiled clothes may be dropped 
and which does away with considerable work 
for the housewife. This chute should be 
set in place before the plastering is finished. 

Another handy built-in cupboard is one 
in a spare corner near the kitchen or in the 
pantry to hold brooms, the carpet sweeper 
and cleaning mop, dustpan, etc., with a few 
convenient pegs for the necessary dustcloth. 
Let there be a place for everything and it 
will be easy to keep everything in its place. 

The Kitchen 

It is to the interest of the housekeeper that 
the kitchen be so arranged with a view to 
convenience and comfort that every hour 
spent therein will be a pleasant one. It is 
the steps that count, so plan your kitchen for 
what we may call **step economy. '* 

We have in mind a kitchen which was 
designed for real efficiency. It is an oblong 
room. Along one wall is a row of windows. 
In the center of the other wall is a door lead- 
ing to the dining room. Next to the dining 
room door is a narrow table (just below the 
sliding panel we mentioned 
in our suggestions 
for the dining 
room) and beneath 
this table are 
built-in draw- 
ers which 
hold towels, 
dusters, etc. 

Remember -' 
to leave space 
for the kitch- 
en range. On the 
remaining side of 
the room is the 
built-in kitchen 
cabinet, with its 
enamelled table 
space and num- 
berless shelves, all 
of cream painted 
woodwork. 



A 




18 



=^ ^° ^ 




^^^ ^ 



Next to the kitchen cabinet is a wide wooden 
shelf, covered with enamelled iron, to which 
the dishes are transferred preparatory to 
being washed. Next comes the sink, fully 
equipped with hot and cold water. On the 
left of the sink is another wide shelf which is 
the draining board. Above is a convenient 
wooden rack for draining the heavy dishes; be- 
low, a cupboard for kettles, saucepans and 
skillets. Next comes another wide shelf, 
whfere the dishes are packed in neat rows ready 
for the next meal. Could the science of 
dishwashing be more carefully worked out? 

The floor of this model kitchen is covered 
with light brown linoleum, the walls are 
painted in soft pleasing blue, and the wood- 
work gives that air of spotless cleanliness 
which every model housekeeper strives for. 

A comfortable rocker and a high stool 
provide means of compliance with the advice 
of the old doctor: * 'Never stand when you 
can sit; never sit when you can lie down,'' 
a rule which every woman who would preserve 
her youth and good looks would do well to 
remember. - 







^:^i^\^ . - - .^^^ 




'N^^ ^ 



In one corner of our kitchen is the built-in 
icebox, with the back of the ice compart- 
ment opening on to the porch, so that there 
is no tracking of muddy boots and dripping 
ice through the kitchen. In the absence of 
a permanent drain pipe, the drip pan beneath 
the ice compartment can also be removed 
and emptied from the outside, thus obviating 
what is frequently a source of petty annoyance 
from an overflow. 

While we are discussing practical matters, 
a few words about screens, storm doors and 
windows will not come amiss. In changing 
climates these are necessities and modern 
ingenuity and forethought have provided us 
with a door needing only a few moments for 
perfect adjustment to winter and summer 
needs and screen windows which are just as 
easily set in place. 

The Pergola 

Living out of doors during the summer as 
we do, we have come to look upon the graceful 
pergola as a characteristic feature and beauti- 
fier of the well-kept garden. Even the charm 
of the porch cannot rival the attraction of one 
of these real out of doors rooms, with its 
white lattice and trailing vines, whose cool 
leafage is a perfect screen from the passers- 
by and from the summer sun. When June 
showers us with her * 'thousand beauties" and 
sweet September sees rich purple grapes 
hanging from the trellised frame, who will 
deny the pergola its value as an integral 
part of the garden, or hesitate to admit that 
its beauty is paralleled by its usefulness and 
worth? 

And here we will take leave of our Home,- 
planned for our happiness and comfort in 
the days to come. 

Let us strive to make our house a Real 
Home; not just a place to eat and sleep in, 
a place to store fine furniture, or a museum of 
rare and costly things; but a place to live in, 
to rest in, to be happy in, to which we cling 
for its associations with those we hold dear; 
so that the little ones who are growing up 
around us may be rightly influenced thereby 
and may look back, when they are full-grown, 
with loving thoughts and memories to the 
happy days spent there. 



20 



^ 




li 



Practical Plan Suggestions 



UE THAT hath eyes to see, let him 
discern, in the pages immediately 
following, the distinct advantages of 
"homes," which reflect the higher stand- 
ards of living, over **houses" — mere places 
to live in. 

Not the least of these advantages is 
effectual economy in both first cost and 
maintenance. 

The difference between **homes" and 
''houses" is not one of price, primarily, 
but of intelligent planning — of finished 
skill in adapting modern materials, meth- 
ods and arrangements to today's ad- 
vanced standard of living. 

These evidences of progress are more 
particularly noticeable in the smaller 
homes, usually considered too restricted 
in size, adaptability and price to permit 
the introduction of refinements hereto- 
fore associated only with generous purse- 
capacity. 

This book shows only a few repre- 
sentative home designs covering a broad 
range, each one suggesting scores of ideas 
which may be developed by studying 
the display of detailed woodwork listed 
on succeeding pages. ; . 

Consult a Competent Architect 

Houses of every grade sometimes dis- 
appoint their owners, because personal 
opinion overrules professional counsel in 
their development. 

First of all, home is a vision. Then 
a series of visions — pictures of the imagi- 
nation as numerous as the members of 



the family which anticipate living in it. 

None of the pictures is like any other. 
Father, mother, sister, brother, all have 
individual perspectives. To be a success, 
home must please all. 

The process of reducing visions to a 
practical workable basis is the most 
critical (though none-the-less delightful) 
period of home building. 

Many excellent ideas are conceived in 
enthusiastic minds, but until they are 
made to conform with architectural prin- 
ciples, they are usually impracticable 
and about as satisfactory as diamonds 
in the rough. 

A better understanding — a more inti- 
mate relationship between home builder 
and architect — will be established by a 
careful study of this volume. 

It is to be noted at the outset that 
this information is not intended to sup- 
plant the supervising architect, nor to 
interfere in any way with his recom- 
mendations; but, on the contrary, to 
facilitate effective, harmonious co-opera- 
tion between client and counsel, to the 
end that the architect's efforts may be 
constructively productive from the begin- 
ning of his engagement. It saves the 
time usually consumed in a preliminary- 
groping about for a common viewpoint, 
for the more important work of actual 
plan building. 

A small premium invested in building 
protection will insure a building worthy 
of the protection it will receive through- 
out all the years of its usefulness. 



22 



^ "' ^-^^ 



Underwrite Your Plans 



CUCCESSFUL home building is one of life's most delight- 
ful experiences, the enjoyment of which totally obscures 
the cost, both in anticipation and recollection; but — 

The default of a few simple precautions may bring lasting 
disappointment, loss and regret. 

Safety in building — the fulfillment of every promise in plans 
and specifications — is assured by association with concerns of 
proved integrity and responsibility. 

Better than promises is contract security, as represented 
by the Morgan Guarantee, which without exacting any pre- 
miums, removes every element of doubt from woodwork pur- 
chases. 



The Key to Responsibility , \ 

an tooobtoorfe bearing tlje **illorgan" stamp, 
b)i)ic!) tuiti) proper care failsf to gibe sat t£if action, 
boill be replaccb free of cfjarge.— iSlorgan 






Backed by the resources of the great Morgan Organization, 
this contract is more than a promise. It is even further-reaching 
than a fire insurance policy, for it protects not only property, 
but peace of mind as well, since **as your home is, so are you." 

Building on uncertainty digs the grave of your hopes. 
Refuse promises — demand assurance. 



iQfigAl 



23 



^ ^■^ ^ 



lU 



















f^ 



%. 





Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 1 



Co M PA C T, commodious, comprehensive — we 
can think of no better description for this at- 
tractive bungalow of Tudor design. Not one 
desirable feature is lacking. Especially appealing is 
the large light and airy living room. The spacious 
porch is equally inviting for eating and sleeping. 
A cozier corner than the sun room would be hard 
to imagine. 

This type is appropriate to any section or climate 
— easy to heat, yet cool in summer, as it provides 
for free circulation of air throughout. Economical 
to build. 





24 



^^^ ^ 








'v^.^^^ 



^'^\. 








if'- nil ^< If 




.^H^- 





Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 2 



n^HE distinctive Tudor tendencies which have been included 
-L in the design of this home are exceptionally impressive — 
it will never be forgotten once it is seen. And you will notice 
that the completeness of the interior has not been sacrificed 
in order to attain its exterior beauty. It is rarely possible 
to have a living porch so easily accessible from both the living 
and dining rooms. And the library or den with its adjacent 
lavatory has very thoughtfully been isolated from the rest 
of the home. 




25 



^^^^ ""^ 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No 3 



A QUAINT Dutch Colonial design much more impressive than 
-^^ its cost would suggest— a design which will always be a credit to 
the owner's judgment. It lends itself well to artistic landscape and 
gardening effects. And the interior arrangement, with its large 
living room, fireplace, adjoining side porch, and four comfortable 
bedrooms, also makes this home worthy of serious consideration. 





26 



^ 




t 




*^\; 



''^'^'^'^^U^.t.. 



'""^^^^m^: 






:¥! 



^, -^ 



M 





Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 4 




TTERE is a Modern Dutch Colonial house which will appeal espe- 
•*• ^ cially to those who are seeking maximum beauty and utility at a 
minimum expense. Characteristic of all Colonial types of homes, this 
one offers unusual possibilities for effective lawn and garden surroundings. 
Included in the well-planned arrangement is a partially-enclosed porch 
reached by French doors from the rear of the living room. The seclusion 
from the street, which such a porch affords, is becoming more and more 
desirable. 




"-^ ^^ ^ 




.e^ 





Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 5 




ANOTHER distinctive and popular Long 
-^^ Island Colonial residence is here illus- 
trated, of which the chief feature, in addition 
to its simple beauty, is the unusually large, 
rear, sleeping porch. It is seldom that such a 
commodious sleeping porch can be provided 
for a home of this size. For those who are 
planning on a moderate-priced home this de- 
sign should prove particularly desirable. 




=^ '' ^ 



^3.M 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 6 




TT^OR those who are attracted by Colonial styles 
^ (and who is not?) the New England home shown 
on this page is everything that can be desired— 
not alone in the beautiful simplicity of its exterior 
but in its sensible, well-planned arrangement as 
well. Every detail of both exterior and interior is 
artistically balanced. It provides a spacious living 
porch as well as a breakfast porch. These two 
features alone are sufficiently attractive to tempt 
any thoughtful home builder. 




^ ^^^ 



'T'^.^iwrf-ijs;?^: 



..ami 






I 



.•M^mumHliemm^ 







Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 7 



JUST as there is a romance of the sunny South in every 
Hne of this Dixie Colonial home, so too, there is comfort 
in every room within its walls. Imagine the feeling of hos- 
pitality which must spread over one when greeted by the 
cozy fireplace nook directly opposite the entrance. The 
more you study this home, the more you will like it. The 
illustration shows the use of wide siding, but the material 
used may be varied to suit the preference of the builder. 




"^ ^^ ^ 








'^' ■'■'i^r^^^s^^S^%'^ jrf^^-^r-,"^" --fp^l 





i-jU__.'Yj. 



=.-,rf^ 






^' ar-.,,... -'feis^ss^ 



Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 8 





TTERE, indeed, is an unusual Modern Amer- 

^ ^ ican home that was truly designed for com- 
fort—from stair hall to sleeping porch— from 
dining porch to living porch. It is plain that 
every detail of this home has received careful 
attention. Note, for instance, the especially 
good wall space with which every room has been 
provided. And the lavatory and phone closet 
at the sides of the entrance is as practical as it is 
unusual. Here is a plan which is filled with many 
pleasant deviations from the ordinary. 



31 



"^. ^ ^ 




"^'^/^''■'^^^^%. 




.^f^M^^^' 



Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 9 



THE square type home shown on this page is always popular, 
because it gives the greatest value for every dollar invested. 
Notice how cleverly the living and dining rooms have been 
separated merely by a built-in buffet and wall space for the piano. 
This Central Western home is unusually well lighted by generous 
window space and the convenience of such a spacious living 
porch needs no comment. All in all, this is a sensible, comforta- 
ble home with no useless frills or fancies. 




^ '' '^^^ 








Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 10 



'T^HIS Modern home will appeal especially to 
^ those who are seeking the unusual. It is truly 
a modern design with a touch of Craftsman em- 
bodying modern conveniences and modern beauty. 
Make a particular note of the terrace which has 
been provided between the artistic fireplace nook 
and the sun room and the open veranda above the 
nook. This is truly a beautiful home anyone would 
be proud to own — and use — and enjoy. 



33 



^ ^^ ^-^^ 



?^:k 



"•«, 



--;? 




^... 





^K~;-->*iLv 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 1 1 



T^ESCRIPTION cannot do jus- 
-L>' tice to this home, which has 
been adapted to the American from 
the Japanese. It is so pretentious 
and so complete that one could fill 
a volume in praise of it. It must 
suffice to merely call your attention 
to the magnificent porches and the 
wonderful windows. This is a ver- 
itable sun home which provides the 
highest type of elegance, comfort 
and beauty. 





^^^ 34 ;^ 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 12 




'T^HIS Mid-Victorian home possesses a com- 
-^ bination of beauty and practicability rarely 
found together. A study of the plan will show 
you that it embodies several unusually attrac- 
tive features. For instance, notice that a com- 
fortable room, which may be used as a den or 
library, adjoins the down-stairs bedroom. 
This will appeal particularly to the man who 
wishes occasionally to seclude himself from 
the rest of the household. Also note the spa- 
cious living room and the sun porch convenient 
to the dining room. This home is well worth 
studying carefully. 




^^ ■^^ ^ 







Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 13 




nPHE more you study this home the more 
^ you will like it. While the basis of the 
design is of English origin it has been 
Americanized and modernized to meet our 
ideas of comfort and beauty. Here, again, 
we find a spacious sun porch adjacent to 
both the living and dining rooms. Also 
note the sensible location of the entrance 
and vestibule in relation to the rest of the 
house. 




^ '' ^ 










:?; 



I', 



■^^^ 








Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 14 




ANOTHER English design is shown here. While 
-^"^ this home would be a credit to any site, it is 
particularly well suited for a small lot. It is shown 
here adapted to stucco or wood, but would be equally 
as economical if built of any other material. 




37 



^ 



^^*^ V^ -*sPV 




i A'*^^^B^^fvf 




-^^* **^,^ 
r^^^,^^^-^ 



Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 15 



TJ^EW homes possess such a quiet, graceful dignity as this Modern 
^ Enghsh design. If you Hke simpUcity, you'll like this home. 
Study it. It may prove to be the home of your dreams. Brick 
veneer has been used in the illustration, but any other standard 
building material would be equally effective. 





^^=^ 38 j,^ 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 16 




WHO would not be proud to own this beautiful home? 
Notice the distinctive treatment of the first floor 
windows and entrance. While this home is primarily of 
Georgian design, it has been modified to meet modern de- 
mands. This home surely is deserving of serious consider- 
ation by everyone who contemplates building. 





39 



^ ^^ ^ 








.iMMiiiilliMllP'^i'M>'^»"»y>^---- - 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 17 



n^HIS stately Late Georgian home is surely an aristocrat 
-^ which will appeal to those who appreciate the exclusive. 
No detail has been overlooked, in the designing of the exterior 
and in the arrangement of the interior, which might add to the 
beauty or completeness of this home. The illustration shows 
it built of brick, but it would be equally attractive in any other 
material. 





40 



=^ ^" ^^^ 




'r^-V"'^' %_ •« i 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 18 



T N RECENT years there has been a marked 
-^ tendency in favor of the Spanish design. 
It is no wonder. Because no other style of 
architecture offers such opportunities for the 
expression of individuahty. The one shown 
on this page contains a wealth of valuable 
suggestions which will appeal to lovers of the 
classical. 



^^ ^^ A^ 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 19 



n^HE effect which the Itahan Renais- 
■^ sance has given to present-day archi- 
tecture is well exemplified in this magnifi- 
cent home. It is indeed a masterpiece 
which could be marred by alteration. 
Notice the unusual arrangement of the 
gallery overlooking a formal loggia at the 
rear and the excellent handling of the 
entire arrangement. 







42 



^^^ ^ 



a#"'' 



r»t 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 20 




THE greatest obstacle to the designing 
of a Duplex home is to keep away from 
the ** Duplex'' appearance. This diffi- 
culty has been artistically overcome in 
the accompanying design. Moreover, the 
semi-detached plan and arrangement are 
all that could be desired in a home of this 
type. 




^^ ^^ ^ 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 21 



^HE California type of bungalow is always worthy 
^ of consideration. We show here a suggestion 
which is a little out of the ordinary from the standpoint 
of beauty and convenience. Study the plan which 
includes three comfortable bedrooms and a cozy 
breakfast nook. It is shown built of long shingles or 
shakes, but can be adapted to other materials as well. 




44 



^^^1^ 




3'» 



istmk 












*-^' ;:'*^ 



^s* •■ 



^^^^ 



.M^'^f^ 




mm. 



Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 22 




n^HIS neat Western Bungalow has met with 
^ unusual favor by those who have studied the 
bungalow subject carefully. It is well lighted, 
well ventilated, and easy to heat. It is seldom 
that so much room and so many conveniences can 
be found under one bungalow roof. Note espe- 
cially the sun room, sleeping porch and spacious 
living room. 




45 



^'' ^ 



..^ ^.l^«.i _.^L. 




If urn 



p| r Qfir rii»K 




*^ 





: "If! r 



riir ppif ir-n Pi 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 23 



AN INEXPENSIVE Modern Bungalow that has 
■^ much in its favor. It is well designed throughout- 
giving the appearance of a much more expensive home, 
and the floor plan, with its large living room and three 
bedrooms, is well arranged. 




^""^ ^ 




Morgan Plan Suggestion No. 24 




AS MUCH thought has been given to the designing 
-^"^ of this artistic Summer Cottage as to the most 
pretentious residence in this book. It certainly would 
be a delightful retreat from the crowded city during the 
sultry months — a perfect haven of rest. 



"^ ^^ ^^ 



Make Home Substantial 



Professional Reminders of Oft-Neglected Precautions 
Concerning Materials and Construction 



'T^HE fascinating romance of home building 
-^ — the pursuit of ideals founded on years 
of delightful delving into the mystic tomes of 
building lore — often distracts the mind from 
the more prosaic, practical consideration of 
materials and construction. 

The average home builder has not had the 
experience to decide technical questions whose 
disposition determines the measure of satis- 
faction his home will yield him. 

He should not, however, ignore the advan- 
tages of being sufficiently informed to discuss 
the important phases of building. So the 
main essentials are here briefly outlined. 

The Plan in Relation to the 
Building Site 

Prospective builders usually start with a 
good general idea of the number and character 
of rooms they require. The floor plan, or 
arrangement of the rooms— whether they are 
ail to be on one floor or divided into several 
stories — depends largely on the building site. 

The location of important rooms should be 
determined by the points of the compass. 
Light and shadow, warmth and air, have 
much to do with the comfort and cheer and 
wholesomeness of the living room, dining 
room, bedroom and kitchen. 

As soon as the plan best suited to one's 
ideals of living and the conditions of the build- 
ing site is chosen, attention should be turned 
to the sizes of the rooms and sufficient wall 
space for furniture, piano, beds, etc. Nothing 
is quite as deceiving to the average man as 
his conception of size conveyed in feet and 
inches. Many an owner, visiting his home 
under construction, finds this or that room 
unexpectedly small. He can avoid such dis- 
appointment by measuring rooms and thus 
establishing in his mind a definite basis for 
comparison. 



Character of the Soil to Build On 

Before starting to build, even before working 
drawings are made, it is advisable to have a 
survey of the site prepared, indicating besides 
the accurate outlines of the property the level 
of the ground in relation to the street or walk, 
the depth of the sewer and the nature of the 
soil. Such preliminary information will insure 
the builder against many unpleasant and costly 
surprises. The ground level naturally deter- 
mines the depth of the foundation. No foun- 
dation should be laid less than two feet below 
this level. In northern localities four feet 
below the finished level is the minimum for 
safety. 

The basement level must be well above 
that of the sewer to permit proper drainage. 
Inquiries regarding the nature of the soil 
may be made of those who have built in the 
vicinity. Where rocks and springs abound 
the soil should be carefully examined. 

The best soil to build on is gravel. Sand is 
also good if confined on all sides and prevented 
from slipping away from under the foundation. 
The greatest care must be exercised with clay 
soils. Moisture causes such soils to ooze 
from under foundations and heave when they 
freeze. It is therefore important to drain 
away all moisture possible and to extend the 
footings; that is, the bottom course of founda- 
tions, well below the point where the clay 
could be affected by frost. 

Dampproofing Foundation Walls 

In all foundations footings should be wid- 
ened and proportioned in accordance with the 
bearing capacity of the ground, in order to 
spread the weight of the building evenly and 
prevent settHng and consequent cracking. 
A good material for footings is concrete. 
The foundation wall, extending from the 



48 



^^Jl^ 



.J 



footings to the finished level of the ground, 
may be of brick, stone, or concrete. Brick 
is suitable for dry soil Rubble stone, solidly 
laid up in cement mortar, makes a good foun- 
dation wall. 

To avoid dampness in the basement, two 
or more coats of asphalt should be applied to 
the outside of the foundation walls and carried 
alLthe way to the bottom of the footings. 
Plastering with cement also is of service. 
A trench alongside of the foundation wall, 
filled with gravel, topped with cement, and 
provided with a drain at the bottom, is usually 
found to be the most efficient way to secure a 
basement free from dampness. 

Fire-Resisting Construction 

Outside walls may be constructed wholly 
of wood, wholly of masonry, or of a combina- 
tion of both. The principal difference between 
wooden frame buildings and others, excepting 
fireproof buildings, is in the material used for 
outside walls. Inside partitions and floors 
are nearly always framed of wood. An im- 
portant precaution in connection with framed 
walls and partitions, one usually not heeded 
because it adds a bit to the cost, is the matter 
of fire stopping. As usually framed, the space 
between vertical supports or studs is left 
entirely open and unobstructed, like chimney 
flues. In case of fire in the basement, sparks 
travel up between studs, carrying the 
flames to the attic. The natural thing to do, 
then, is to stop the spaces between studs 
and floor joists in some manner, preferably 
with brick or tile laid in mortar. The spaces 
between the ends of the first floor joists and 
beams supporting the joists should be filled 
in the same way. Floor joists and studs 
should be kept at least two inches away from 
smoke flues and fireplaces. The space be- 
tween the timbers and flues should be filled 
with mortar or mineral wool. Such construc- 
tion will not only prevent the spread of flame, 
but will also obstruct the passage of mice or 
other vermin. 

The Choice of Materials 

The material for the exterior of a home 
determines its design to a considerable extent. 



It is therefore important to decide early the 
kind of material to be used. Shall it be 
wood, stucco, hollow tile, concrete, brick, or 
stone? Cost, availability and personal taste 
enter here and should govern. 

Wood is the least costly. Stucco on wood 
frame comes next, with brick veneer following. 
Hollow tile and concrete are about as costly 
as brick, while stone is the most expensive, 
though its cost varies greatly according to 
the flnish and the nearness of the quarry. 

Roofing Materials 

The roof is important in determining the 
exterior character of a home. Good taste, 
guided by practical considerations, should 
govern the choice of a rooflng material. 

The formal type of exterior usually requires 
a roof of smooth texture and fairly uniform 
color. Rough-textured, many-hued roofs are 
appropriate to informal designs as long as 
they are kept within the bounds of harmony 
and good taste. 

In a general way the roofing material is 
determined by that of the walls. Wood 
shingles are used with any walls— cedar, 
cypress and redwood being the most common. 
These may be stained in colors to harmonize 
with the walls, or treated with creosote or fire- 
retarding paints. For buildings of other ma- 
terials than wood, stucco and brick, the most 
important roofing consists of slate and clay 
tiles. Slates vary in color from reds to purples 
and greens. Clay tiles may be obtained in 
various shapes and colors. There are the 
flat shingle tiles, or those of the interlocking 
Spanish type in reds or greens and glazed or 
mat finishes. 

In addition to the roofing materials named, 
various makes of asbestos and composition-felt 
shingles have recently come into use and have 
produced a material of attractive appearance. 

Sheet metal, such as copper, lead and tin, 
is also used as roof covering. In certain types 
of exteriors the metallic surfaces with stand- 
ing seams give a desirable effect. Copper is 
the most expensive, but has the advantage 
of never requiring paint. In the average 
type of home, however, the use of metal for 
roofing is ordinarily limited to entrance cano- 
pies, porch roofs, etc. 



^^ "" ^ 



The Pitch or Slope of the Roof 

Each type of roofing material just discussed 
calls for a roof of decided slope. The minimum 
slope which may be safely used varies with 
the material. Many roofs leak because their 
pitch or slope is not right. For each foot in 
the width of the building a minimum slope is 
demanded, varying from eight inches for slate 
and clay tile to two inches for sheet metal. 
Wood shingles require a minimum pitch of six 
inches for each foot of width. 

Roof Construction 

Rusting nails destroy shingle roofs. Experi- 
ence proves that the old cut iron nail is to be 
preferred over the common wire nail in general 
use. Other roofing should be applied in strict 
accordance with the manufacturers' directions 
or specifications. 

The spaces between the ends of the rafters 
should be carefully filled in. In wooden 
buildings boards should be fitted between the 
rafters and all cracks carefully covered with 
building paper. In masonry buildings, the 
walls should be carried to the under side of 
the roof boards and between the rafter ends, 
and all voids carefully filled with mortar. 

Provide proper flashing around places 
where leaks most commonly occur, as around 
chimneys, dormers, etc. Flashings consist of 
pieces of sheet metal, tin, zinc, copper, or lead. 
The angle formed by the roof and the vertical 
surfaces must be securely covered with these 
metal sheets. 

Essential qualities of the home are weather 
and damp-proofness, fire-resistance and endur- 
ance. Let us see how these may be achieved. 

How to Make Frame Buildings 
Wind-Proof and Warm 

A good quality building paper, properly 
placed, makes frame buildings weather-tight 
and affords efficient heat insulation. This 
should be nailed over the sheathing just before 
the facing material is put on, taking special 
care to cover all joints and angles. Let it 
also be remembered that where the outside 
wall is built of wood framing, the timber 



known as the sill, resting directly on the 
masonry foundation wall, should be thoroughly 
bedded in cement mortar. This will stop an 
otherwise open joint, which would admit cold 
air. 

Precautions as to Plastering 
and Flooring 

Plastering often cracks because of uneven 
settling of the building, due to faulty 
foundation. Lath must be nailed right to in- 
sure a good job of plastering. Besides nailing 
the right distance apart for proper clinching of 
the plaster, they must break joints at about 
every seventh lath. Underfiooring should be 
dressed on one side to a uniform thickness. 
It should not be laid to run in the same direc- 
tion as the finished floor. Best of all, let the 
boards be laid diagonally, as it tends to stiffen 
the building. Underfloors should be laid close 
together. 

Care of Interior Woodwork 

Great care must be taken of interior finish. 
First of all, let no doors and trim be brought 
to the premises before the building is thor- 
oughly dry and warm. Immediately upon 
delivery have the painter apply a coat of filler 
or stain to all sides of the woodwork — yes, the 
back of the trim, base and panelling, too. 
This will protect the wood from the effects of 
dampness. It must be remembered that even 
ordinary doors require much precaution and 
care, though a veneered door with a white 
pine core will withstand much more than 
ordinary doors. 

The interior finish applied, the floors may be 
laid. This should be done last to avoid un- 
necessary damage and wear by workmen. 
Painting and wood finishing follow, of course. 
This important branch of the work is thor- 
oughly covered elsewhere in this volume. 

Working Drawings and Specifications 

Every phase of the new home should be 
clearly indicated in a complete set of working 
drawings and specifications. The plans should 
show all dimensions exactly, include details 
and design, indicate the kinds of material, etc. 



^^ 



50 



The specifications should further describe Hon is begun. Later changes prove costly and 

details of construction, the kinds of appliances form the "Extras" so much dreaded by owner 

to be used, as m wiring, heating and plumbing; architect, contractor and material man 
also, the workmanship required, covering fully It is well for the prospective builder to 

every trade to be employed. It is wise to familiarize himself with all matters discussed 

obtain the services of an impartial and prac- in this article. Within these brief limits they 

tical superintendent in order to make sure could hardly be more than touched upon Let 

that plans and specifications are strictly the home builder learn all he can along the 

followed, lines suggested, for he will then be able to co- 

Above all, let everything about the building operate all the more with those who are to make 

be decided before contracts are let and construe- his home a reality 



^^ 



51 



The Wider Front Door 

TATE ALL want our homes to express bigness — not 
in the size as much as in the higher, finer things 
of life — and what cati do this better than a hospitable 
looking front door? 

Narrowness has no place in such a spirit. A wide 
front door will help to convey the fact that our new 
home is not just a place where we reside, but a home 
which is all the word stands for. 

A wide door is appropriate for the bungalow, or 
cottage, Colonial or any other type of home, and we 
know you will agree that it surely does add a certain 
air of spaciousness, attractiveness, and **homeyness" to 
the entrance, which is felt by neighbors and friends, as 
well as by strangers passing by. 

Then, too, it is often a great convenience to the 
owner. Large, bulky pieces of furniture can be moved 
through a wide door without marring the furniture, 
woodwork, or walls. 

This matter may seem only a little detail, but it is 
close attention to the little things that brings perfect 
harmony. 



^^ 



52 




Entrance M-50 



N 



O ENTRANCE could impart a better first impression for a 
home than this beautiful Morgan Standardized Empire design. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Sidelights, 
Glazed Plain Double Strength Glass. Other Glass can be had 
if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Masonry or Stud Wall, 
for a 3' 6" x T 0" door is 6' 3" x T 4\ 

Door M-641 in above design shown on page 232. Sidelights 
M-855 in above design shown on page 270. 



^"^ "-^ ^ 




Entrance M-51 

n^HIS attractive Colonial entrance greets one with a hospitable 



i 



welcome— and that is what the entrance of a home should do. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Sidelight Panels, Door, 
Sidelight Sash and Transom Sash glazed Leaded Double Strength 
as shown. Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 3' 0" x T 0" 
door is 6' 0" x 8' 8". 



54 



^ ^^^ 




^ 



Entrance M-52 

TTERE is another Colonial design which fulfills all that could 
-*--*- be desired in a well-chosen entrance. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Sidelight Panels, Door, 
Sidelight Sash and Elliptical Transom glazed Leaded Double 
Strength as shown. Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 3' 0" x T 0" 
door is 6' 2" x 9' 0", 

Door M-642 in above design shown on page 233. Sidelight 
Sash and Panel M-854 in above design shown on page 270. 



55 



^"V. ^^ >s^ 




Entrance M-53 

T^HE entrance shown here reflects a substantial, well- 
^ appointed home in which a wealth of comfort awaits one. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Sidelights. 
Glazed, genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. Other 
Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0" X 7' 0" door is 5' 10*' x T 4". 

Door M-903 in above design shown on page 280. Side- 
lights M-856 in above design shown on page 271. 



56 



"^ ^^ ^ 




Entrance M-54 



T 



HIS design is as beautiful as it is unusual, 
a desire to look within. 



It promotes 



Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0" X T 0'' door is 6' 0" x T 4". 

Door M-908 in above design shown on page 283. Side- 
lights M-860 in above design shown on page 271. 



57 



^^^"^ ^^ 




Entrance M-55 

TT^HE design shown above has proved a very popular one, 
-^ and we beheve it is justly deserving. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Masonry Wall, for 
a 3' 0" X 7' 0" door is 6' 0" x 7' i\ 

Door M-905 in above design shown on page 281. Side- 
lights M-861 in above design shown on page 271. 



/ 



58 



^^Jl^ 




I 



Entrance M-56 

A QUI ET Craftsman entrance that would prove a credit 
-^^ to any home without incurring a prohibitive expense. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0" X T 0" door is 5' 3" x T 4". 

Door M-625 in above design shown on page 229. Side- 
lights M-859 in above design shown on page 271. 



^Jl^ 




Entrance M-57 

A CONSERVATIVE, inexpensive entrance that is a popular 



l\ 



favorite. The style is Craftsman 



Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stucco Wall, for a 
3' 0" X 7' 0" door is 6' 2" x T 4". 

Door M-625 in above design shown on page 229. Side- 
lights M-852 in above design shown on page 270. 



60 



^^ "^ ^ 




Entrance M-58 

'T^HIS Morgan Standardized Entrance is the same as that 
-^ shown on the preceding page, with the exception of the 
long glass panels in the sidelights. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0'' X 7' 0" door is 6' 2" X 7' 4". 

Door M-625 in above design shown on page 229. Side- 
lights M-853 in above design shown on page 270. 



^^^ ^ 




Entrance M-59 

A PLAIN and artistic Entrance with no ornamentation. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Plain Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0'' X r 0" door is 6' T x T 4". 

Door M-654 in above design shown on page 236. Side- 
lights M-851 in above design shown on page 270. 



^^ 62 ^ 




II 



Entrance M-60 

A GOOD-LOOKING modern design that can be installed 
-^"^ at a nominal cost. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Plain Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0" X T 0'' door is 6' 2" x T V. 

Door M-650 in above design shown on page 234. Side- 
lights M-850 in above design shown in page 270. 



"^'^ ^ 




Entrance M-61 



'T^HE art glass in sidelights adds a touch of distinction to 
-•- this otherwise plain and dignified entrance. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Sidelight Panels, 
Door, Glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate and Sidelight 
Sash glazed Leaded Art Glass. Other Glass can be had 
if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Stud Wall, for a 
3' 0" X T 0" door is 6' 8'' x T 4". , . 

Door M-654 in above design shown on page 236. 



64 



"^"^ ^ 



LIU 




Entrance M-62 

A PLAIN, rich entrance especially good where a maximum 
-^^ of light is needed. 

Complete Entrance includes Franie, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Bevel Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Masonry Wall, for a 
3' 0" X r 0" door is 5' 10" x 7' 4". 

Door M-611 in above design shown on page 223. Side- 
lights M-857 in above design shown on page 271. 



65 



"^ ^^^ 




Entrance M-63 

A GOOD Morgan Standardized design that is neat and 
-^"^ attractive wherever used. 

Complete Entrance includes Frame, Door and Side- 
lights glazed genuine polished Plain Plate as shown. 
Other Glass can be had if desired. 

Size of Entrance Rough Opening, Masonry Wall, for a 
3' 0" X 7' 0" door is 6' 2" x 7' 4". 

Door M -6 19 in above design shown on page 226. Side- 
lights M-858 in above design shown on page 271. 



"^ ^^ >^^ 



1 ' 



Through the Vestibule 



The Entrance 



TN RECENT years there has been a tendency to 
eliminate the vestibule in the home. But the 
vestibule is a convenience of real, practical utility 
which should not be overlooked. One should be 
included if possible. 

A common fault in vestibule designing is the 
use of a too narrow door into the interior. This 
error not only counteracts the pleasing effect of 
the ** wider front door," engendering a feeling of 
being cramped, but also obstructs the passage of 
large furniture. 

Look over the plans in the front of this book 
once more. Most of them provide for a vestibule. 
They will give you a good idea of how the vestibule 
should be arranged. Do not neglect this impor- 
tant subject. 



67 



^^^ ^ 



Beautiful, Easy-Mounting 
Stairways 



IV /rUCH of the beauty and comfort of the home 
^^^ depends upon the stairway. Their effective 
aid to comfort and elegance is recognized by all 
architects, who spare no pains in the placing and 
in the arrangement of this feature of the home. 

Stairway requirements are as numerous and 
varied as floor plans. Each plan demands a 
harmonious stairway. 

Moreover, all upstairs furniture must be taken 
to the second floor by way of the stairway and 
this matter should be carefully considered. 

The Morgan Standardized designs on the 
following pages have been so carefully worked 
out that among them may be found the proper 
stairway for any home. Being constructed of 
Morgan Standardized parts, they may be adapted 
to limitless variations. 

All Morgan stairways are designed with a 
special regard for comfort. There is no ''climb- 
ing" — you mount by easy stages and reach the 
top without fatigue. 



"V. 68 ^^ 





1 Newel M- 200 

2 Baluster . .M-1784 

3 Cornice Cap M-8090 

4 Cornice Cap M-8256 

5 Sprung Cove, 

WxAW M-8029 

6 Band Moulding M-8262 



Colonial Stairs M-200 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

F'or individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 

Page 

7 Picture Moulding .M-8263 J^ 383 

8 Landing Nosing . .M-1702-E 322 

9 Cove Moulding . .M^060 376 

10 Panel Strip M-8281 377 

11 Well-hole Facia, 

11 M" wide M-8424 397 

Page 12 Band Moulding . .M-8141 380 

69 13 Well-hole Trim . .M-8640 391 
326 14 Face String to fit 

378 rise and run . . .M- 200 69 

382 15 Chair Rail M-8636 382 

16 Window Stop M<8541 379 

376 17 Stair Tread to 

383 fit run M-1702-D 322 



Page 

18 Stair Riser to fit 
rise M-1702-C 322 

19 Window Stool . . . M-8267i^ 386 

20 Window Apron . .M.8641 383 

21 Stair Rail M-1767 326 

22 Corner Bead M-8238 383 

23 Base Moulding. . .M^262 383 

24 Base, 5^" wide . .M-8828 397 

25 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

26 Door Stop M-8542 379 

27 Door Jamb, 
53^" wide M-8424 397 

28 Casing M-8711 390 

29 Back Band M-8387 390 



^ "" ^ 




Early Colonial Stairs M-201 



For 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 
individual illustration of parts see pages 



1 Stair String to fit 

rise and run M- 

2 Door Stop M- 

3 Door Jamb,534"wideM- 

4 Casing M- 

5 Newel M- 

6 Cap M- 

7 Cove Mouldnig M- 

8 Top Rail of PanelingM- 

9 Laminated Panel . . . M- 

10 Bottom Rail of Pan- 

eling M- 

11 Base M- 



•1702-B 

■8542 

•8424 

8309 

■1744 

8614 

8060 

556 

556 

556 
8385 



Page 
322 

379 

397 
388 
324 
380 
376 
208 
208 

208 
392 



indicated in last column. 

Page 

12 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

13 Hand Rail M-1768 326 

14 Landing Nosing M-1702-E 322 

15 Well-hole Facia, 
lOM" wide M-8424 397 

16 Stair Tread to fit run M- 1702-D 322 

17 Stair Riser to fit rise M-1702-C 322 



18 Base Moulding M-8036 375 

19 Base M-8828 397 

20 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

21 Base Block M-1798 327 

22 Window Stool M-8267 386 

23 Window Apron M-8641 383 




24 Muntin of Paneling. M- 556 

25 Stair Baluster M-1783 

26 Window Stop M-8541 



Page 

208 
326 
379 



==^'^ ^ 





1 Angle Newel M-1759 

2 Hand Rail M-1767 

3 Cap M-8721 

4 Cove Moulding M-8060 



Page 
325 

326 
395 
376 



Craftsman Stairs M-202 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pa^es 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

5 Head Casing M-8394 393 

6 Neck Moulding. . . .M-8395 393 

7 Stair Tread to fit run M-1702-D 322 

8 Stair Riser to fit rise M-1702-C 322 

9 Stair Newel M-1747 324 

10 Base Block M-1798 327 

11 Face String to fit 

rise and run M- 202 71 

12 Landing Nosing. . . .M-1702-E 322 

13 Well-hole String. . . .M-8424 397 



Page 

14 Well-hole Trim M-8308 388 

15 Casing M-8308 388 

16 Stair Baluster M-1781 326 

17 Wall String to fit 

rise and run M-1702-B 322 

18 Stool, %"xlH" M-8599 385 

19 Window Apron M-8641 383 

20 Base Moulding M-8036 375 

21 Base, 5}4" wide. . . .M-8424 397 

22 Base Shoe M-8422 397 



^ '' ^^ 




Modern Stairs M-203 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 Baluster Stock M-1782 326 

2 Stair String to fit 

rise and run M-1702-B 322 

3 Hand Rail M-1765 326 

4 Base Block M-1798 327 

5 Shoe M-8657 384 

6 Face String to fit 

rise and run M- 203 72 

7 String M-8424 397 

8 Stair Tread to fit run M- 1702-D 322 

9 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

10 Stair Riser to fit rise M-1702-C 322 

1 1 Picture Moulding. . . M-8265 383 



Page 

12 Stool. %"xl%" M-8599 385 

13 Window Apron M-8641 383 

14 Cap M-8721 395 

15 Fillet M-8620 381 

16 Head Casing M-8394 393 

17 Neck Moulding M-8395 393 

18 Base and Scribe 

Moulding M-8036 375 

19 Base M-8828 397 

20 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

21 Angle Newel M-1758 325 

22 Starting Newel M-1741 323 

23 Casing M-8308 388 




24 Door Jamb, 

53^" wide. , 

25 Door Stop . . 



.M-8424 
.M-8542 



Page 

397 
379 



^ ^^ ^ 





Mission Stairs M-204 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pa^es 
indicated in last column. 



C^^'C^^'i' 



Page 

1 Wall String to fit 

rise and nin M-1702-B 322 

2 Picture Moulding. . .M-8265 383 



Page 

'3 Paneled Post, 

7H"x7}^" M-204 73 

4 Stair Tread to fit run M-1702-D 322 

5 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

6 Stair Riser to fit rise M-1702-C 322 

7 Cornice Cap, 

iy%'x2}i" M-8721 395 

8 Moulding M-8532 376 

9 Cornice Frieze M-8424 397 

10 Opening Jamb, 

534" wide M-8424 397 

11 Door Stop M-8542 379 



Page 

12 Door Jamb, 

5)^" wide M-8424 397 

13 Caang M-8309 391 

14 Back Band M-8378 391 

15 Base Moulding M-8036 375 

16 Base, 534" wide. . . .M-8828 397 

17 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

18 Wall Pilaster, 

2M'x7i4" M- 204 73 

19 Balusters M-1785 326 

20 Rail M-1768 326 

21 Shoe M-1768 326 

22 Fillet M-1776 326 



"^^ 73 ^^^ 




Dutch Colonial Stairs M-205 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Cornice Moulding M-8614 

2 Cove Moulding: M-8060 

3 Cornice Frieze M-8397 

4 Beam Soffit M-8397 

5 Rail Buttress M-8394 

6 Stair Tread to fit run . . M-1702< 

7 Cove Moulding M-8059 

8 Stair Riser to fit rise. . .M-1702- 

9 Newel . .M-1748 

10 Base Moulding M-8262 

11 Base M-8828 

12 Base Shoe M-8422 

13 Stool, H'xlM" M-8599 

14 Window Apron M-8641 



380 
376 
384 
384 
384 

D 322 
376 

C 322 
324 
383 
397 
397 
385 
383 



Page 

15 Landing Nosing M-1702-E 322 

16 Well-hole String M-8424 397 

17 Cove Moulding M-8061 376 

18 Face String to fit rise 

and run M-205 74 

19 Wall String to fit rise 

rise and run M-1702-B 322 

20 Stair Rail M-1767 326 

21 Fillet M-1776 326 

22 Cap Moulding M-8721 395 

23 Head Casing M-8394 393 

24 Fillet M-8395 393 

25 Casing M-8308 388 

26 Stair Balusters M-1781 326 




=^ ^^ ^ 




Mission Stairs M-206 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 




Page 

1 Picture Moulding M-8263 383 

2 Wall String to fit rise 

and run M-1702-B 322 

3 Stair Tread to fit run. .M-1702-D 322 

4 Stair Riser to fit rise. . .M-1702-C 322 

5 Stair Balusters M-1781 326 

6 Stair Rail. . . .Modified, M-1765 326 

7 Bead M-8570 379 

8 Fillet M-1776 326 

9 Landing Nosing M-1702-E 322 

10 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

11 Top Rail of Paneling. . .M- 555 208 



Page 

12 Laminated Panel M- 555 208 

13 Stool, l}i"xl^' M-8267 386 

14 Window Apron M-8641 383 

15 Post, 63^"x63^" M- 206 75 

16 Muntin of Paneling. . . . M- 555 208 

17 Back Band M-8378 391 

18 Casing M-8309 391 

19 Door Jamb, bV/ wide M-8424 397 

20 Door Stop M-8542 379 

21 Base Moulding M-8036 375 

22 Base, 5}4' wide M-8828 397 

23 Base Sho'e M-8422 397 



"^^^ ^^ 



ib 




Modern Stairs M-207 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 Newel M-1740 323 

2 Cap Moulding M-8396 393 

3 Head Casing M-8394 393 

4 Neck Moulding M-8395 393 

5 Tread to fit run M- 1702-D 322 

6 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

7 Stair Riser to fit rise , . .M-1702-C 322 

8 Stair Rail M-1767 326 

9 Stair Rail Fillet M-1774 326 

10 Angle Newel M-1756 325 

11 Frieze Board M-8394 393 

12 Picture Moulding M«82633^ 383 

13 Baluster M-1781 326 

14 Shoe M-1772 326 

15 Fillet M-1775 326 



Page 

16 Stair Nosing M-1702-E 322 

17 Frieze M-8424 397 

18 Bed Mould M-8064 378 

19 Top Rail of Panel M- 555 208 

20 Laminated Panel M- 555 208 

21 Panel Muntin M- 555 208 

22 Casing .M-8309 388 

23 Base Block M-1798 327 

24 Wall String to fit 

rise and run M-1702-B 322 

25 Face String to fit 

rise and run M- 207 76 

26 Base Mould M-8740 396 

27 Base M-8741 396 

28 Base Shoe M-8422 396 




76 



"^ ^"^ 




> 



Composite Stairs M-208 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 




Page 

1 Angle Newel M-1758 325 

2 Stair Tread to fit run. . . M- 1702-D 322 

3 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

4 Stair Riser to fit rise . . .M-1702-C 322 

5 Threshold .M-8278 387 

6 Landing Tread M-1702-E 322 

7 Stair String to fit 

rise and run M-1702-B 322 

8 Stile of Paneling M- 555 208 

9 Laminated Panel M- 555 208 

10 Starting Newel M-1745 324 

11 Dust Cap M-8282 377 

12 Cap Mould M-8623 381 

13 Head Casing M-8424 397 

14 Panel Moulding M-8140 380 

15 Neck Moulding M-8403 394 

16 Balustrade Cap M-8667 382 

17 Fillet M-8625 382 

18 Top Rail of Paneling . . . M- 555 208 



Page 

19 Panel Moulding M-8571 379 

20 Fillet M-1776 326 

21 Shoe M-8610 380 

22 Stile M-8394 384 

23 Panel Moulding M-8610 380 

24 String to fit rise and 

run. .M-208 77 

25 Face String M-8424 397 

26 Well-hole Trim M-8667 382 

27 Picture Moulding M-82633^ 383 

28 Base Moulding : .M-8740 396 

29 Base M-8415 396 

30 Base Shoe M-8422 396 

31 Hand Rail M-1766 326 

32 Door Jamb, 

5K'' wide .M-8424 397 

33 Casing M-8309 388 

34 Door Stop M-8542 379 

35 Turned Baluster M-1780 326 



^ ^^ ^ 




Craftsman Stairs M-209 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 StartingNewel,ModifiedM-1759 325 

2 Picture Moulding M-8265 383 

3 Stair Tread to fit run. .M-1702-D 322 

4 Cove Moulding M-8059 376 

5 Stair Riser to fit rise. . .M-1702-C 322 

6 Angle Newel M-1759 325 

7 Base Block M-1798 327 

8 Face String to fit rise 

and run M- 209 78 

9 Stair Rail M-1767 326 

10 Cap M-8721 395 

11 Head Casing M-8394 393 

12 Neck Moulding M-8395 393 



Page 

13 Landing Nosing M-1702-E 322 

14 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

15 Well-hole Frieze M-8424 397 

16 Well-hole Trim M-8308 388 

17 Balusters . .M-1785 326 

18 Wall String to fit rise 

and run M-1702-B 322 

19 Door Stop M-8542 379 

20 Door Jamb, 53^" wide M-8424 397 

21 Casing ". M-8308 388 

22 Base Moulding M-8036 375 

23 Base, 5^ wide M-8828 397 

24 Base Shoe M-8422 397 




78 



"^ ^ 



The Reception Hall's Relation 

to Home 



THE outstanding function of the entrance hall 
or reception room is to make your guests feel 
at home. 

It should impress them with a dignified cordi- 
ality, fulfilling the promise of '*the wider front 
door." 

The stairway being the central theme, it is 
incumbent on all other woodwork and furnishings 
to provide an appropriate setting. 

On the following pages are two much admired 
photographs which may suggest ideas that will 
start you in the right direction, while most of the 
home plans shown in the front of the book show 
the appropriate location for the reception room. 



^''^ 



Ill 




Reception Hall M-248 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Cornice Moulding M-8374 

2 Cornice Frieze M-8359 

3 Paneled Soffit M- 248 

4 Band Moulding M-8036 

5 Base Block M- 248 

6 Base Moulding. ... M-8262 



Page 
390 

390 
80 

375 
80 

383 



7 Base M-8705 

8 Base Shoe M-8422 

9 Back Band M- 248 

10 Casing M-8091 

11 Door Jamb, 5^" wide M-8424 

12 Door Stop M-8542 



Page 

389 
396 
80 
378 
397 
379 



The pair of French Doors are Morgan design M-686 
shown on page 249 




^il^ 




Reception Hall M-249 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 




Page 

81 
390 
390 
381 

81 
381 
383 



1 Stair Newels M- 249 

2 Back Band M-8387 

3 Casing M-8711 

4 Cornice Moulding... M-8624 

5 Dentil Moulding... .M- 249 

6 Band Moulding. . . .M-8619 

7 Picture Moulding. . .M-8263 

8 Stair Tread to fit run M- 1702-D 322 

9 Stair Moulding. . . . .M-8060 376 

10 Stair Riser to fit rise M-1702-C 322 

11 Stair Rail M-1767 326 

12 Fillet M-1774 326 

13 Balusters M-1780 326 

14 Wall String to fit 

rise and run M-1702-B 322 

15 Bracket M-1718 322 



Page 

16 Face String to fit 

rise and run M- 249 81 

17 Stile of Paneling. . . . M- 557 209 

18 Panel M-249 81 

19 Stair Nosing. M-1702-E 322 

20 Frieze. . .Rabetted, M-8397 384 

21 Stile of Paneling 

Rabetted, M-8394 384 

22 Casing M-8712 390 

23 Cased Opening Jamb, 

73^''wide M-8424 397 

24 Band Moulding over 

Chair Rail M-8387 390 

25 Chair Rail M-8711 390 

26 Base M-8426 397 

27 Base Shoe M-8422 397 



The Accordion French Doors are Morgan design M-403 
shown on page 158 



=^^' /^ 



A Little Big Helper 
in Every Room 



TITE ALL derive a great deal of comfort and 
pride from the consciousness that every- 
thing in our new home is just as *' modern" as it 
can be. 

The news about helpful improvements travels 
fast. No wonder, then, that we see in so many 
of the modern houses of today that inconspicuous 
little attachment which supplies power for all the 
tedious, wearing household duties. 

The drudgery of hand-work is banished— 
there's power to run the home machinery as well 
as that of the factory. No more rough, red, 
work-scarred hands— they're old-fashioned now. 

Electricity is the liberator, and little brass 
sockets, conveniently placed on the walls of 
rooms and hallways, the medium. What a con- 
venience! 

With an electric socket in every room you 
have both power and light at the same time— no 
need of climbing chairs or stepladder to unscrew 
the light bulb and screw in the plug every time 
the vacuum cleaner, or sewing machine, or 
washer, or percolator, or phonograph, or player 
piano, is pressed into service. Could anything 
be handier? 

The time to install these sockets is when you 
build — it will cost much less than tearing your 
walls to pieces afterwards, to say nothing of the 
bother and dirt it avoids. 



^'' ^ 



The Living Room's Relation 
to Contentment 



TJNDENIABLY, the living room is the heart 
of the home. From it are generated all of 
those rich affections which make life beautiful. 
And it is the living room which should be a sym- 
pathetic retreat from the more sordid affairs 
of life. 

These are the considerations which dominate 
the several living room suggestions on the suc- 
ceeding pages. You will observe that each design 
bears the unmistakable stamp of artistry, which 
can only be accomplished by master craftsmen. 
If you would make your house a home in which 
weary body and nerves may find complete re- 
juvenation, look well to the living room! 



^^ii^ 




Living Room M-250 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 Cornice Moulding M-8623 381 

2 Cornice Frieze. . .M-8641 383 

3 Cornice Frieze. . .M-8635 382 

4 Cap Moulding. . .M-8410 395 

5 Fillet M-8404 394 

6 Head Casing, 

6M"wide M-8424 397 

7 Corner Trim for 

Fireplace M- 250 84 

8 Mantelshelf. . . .M- 250 84 



Page 

9 Casing M-8309 391 

10 Door Jamb, 

53^" wide M-8424 397 

11 Laminated Panel.M- 250 84 

12 Stile of Paneling. M- 556 208 

13 Door Stop M-8085 378 

14 Base M-8426 397 

15 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

16 Window Seat. . . .M- 250 84 

17 Stile of Paneling.M- 556 208 



The pair of French Doors are Morgan design M-686 
shown on page 249 



1<^ 

2 ^ 



14 



hi5 



n 



5 

6 

10 



11 



IS"- 



Q. 



[/ 



12 



16 



-^ 11 ^^ 

\ !_! ^ 



84 



-^ 




Living Room M-251 




n 


, ^//q 


L 




"^ 




) 




y ■ 


X 

16 






11 


"1 


>' r 


^ 


-^ 


-f 




13 




13 






/ 


,J12 , 


14 




17 




L 


_ 








L 


"~^15 


J 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last colun^n. 



Page 

1 Laminated PanelM- 251 85 9 Cornice MouldingM-801 3 

2 Panel Moulding.. M-8619 381 10 Cornice Apron M-8712 

3 Stile of Paneling. M- 555 208 11 Base M-8426 

4 Stile of Paneling. M- 555 208 12 Base Shoe 'M-84'>'^ 

5 Muntin of 13 Casing [.[ M-8705 

Paneling M- 555 208 14 Door Jamb, 

6 Cornice MouldingM-8008 373 5}4" wide M-8424 

7 Cornice Frieze . . . M-8615 380 15 Door Stop ....;:; M-8085 

8 Cornice Soffit, 16 Window Seat. . . .M- 251 

3M' M-8394 384 17 Corner Blocks. . .M- 251 

The Door shown is a 3 panel Special 

Morgan Standardized 1 panel or 2 panel 
can be substituted 



Page 
373 

390 
397 
397 
389 

397 

378 

85 

85 



"^^^ ^5 ^ 




Living Room M-252 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 Back Band M-8378 391 

2 Chair Rail M-8358 390 

3 Cornice Facia 

Plowed, M-8615 380 

4 Cornice Soffit 

With tongue, M-8615 380 

5 Crown Moulding. . .M-8012 373 

6 Mantel Shelf M-252 86 

7 Cove Moulding M-8061 376 

8 Mantel Shelf Facia. M- 252 86 

9 Mantel Shelf Soffit. M- 252 86 

10 Mantel Shelf Apron M-8394 384 

11 Mantel Shelf Back 

Band M-8368 390 



Page 

12 Mantel Shelf Casing M-8397 384 

13 Mantel Shelf Band 

Moulding... M-8221 382 

14 Window Stop M-8541 379 

15 Picture Moulding. . .M-8263 383 

16 Window Apron M-8641 383 

17 Window Stool M-8267 386 

18 Base M-8426 397 

19 Base Shoe M-8712 390 

20 Back Band M-8378 391 

21 Casing. .M-8309 391 

22 Door Jamb, 

53^" wide M-8424 397 

23 Door Stop M-8542 379 



The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-711 
shown on page 260 






1 3 

4 r , 



114 



15 



h 



•56 



12 



18 ^°n 



19 



13^ 



R 



17 



Un_ 



! 10 



2d'- 



12 



86 



^^ °° ^ 




Living Room M-253 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pa^es 
indicated in last column. 



I ^ 



h' 



2 5 



•^ 




1 Face Pilasters M-8397 

2 Door Jamb M-8424 

3 Door Stop M-8542 

4 Door Casing M-8309 

5 Wall Pilasters M- 253 

6 Base Moulding M-8059 



Page 

384 
397 
379 
391 
87 
376 



7 Base ....M-8828 

8 Base Shoe M-8422 

9 Head Trim M-8394 

10 Picture Moulding M-8263 

11 Corner Moulding M- 253 

12 Threshold.-.. M-8278 



The Panel Door in illustration is Morgan design M-710 
shown on page 259 

The Sash Door in illustration is Morgan design M-626, 

glazed with Leaded Art Glass, 

shown on page 229 



Page 

397 

397 
384 
383 
87 
387 



87 



"S .^ 




Living Room M-254 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Cove Moulding M-8061 

2 Wainscot Cap \ ^ ^o;-^ 

3 Cove Moulding/- •••^"^^^^ 

4 Top Rail of Paneling M- 555 

5 Panel Moulding M-8619 

6 Laminated Panel . . . M- 254 

7 Base M-8790 

8 Base Shoe M-8422 

9 Cap Moulding M-8712 

10 Fillet, %'xr M-8614 

11 Fillet M-8621 



Page Page 

376 12 Back Band M-8713 391 

ooo 13 Moulding M-8619 381 

*^°^ 14 Casing M-8711 390 

208 15 Door Jamb, 

381 53^" wide M-8424 397 

88 16 Crown Moulding, 

397 33^" ....M-8533 376 

397 17 Crown Moulding. . .M-8032 375 

390 18 Bed Moulding. ..... M-8133 380 

380 19 Frieze Board M-8711 390 

381 20 Neck Moulding .... M-8564 379 



The Doors shown in illustration are Morgan design M-686 
on page 249 




88 



^^Jl^ 




Living Room M-255 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 




Page 

1 Crown Moulding. . .M-8014 373 

2 Cornice Soffit M-8643 383 

3 Cove Moulding M-8060 376 

4 Dentil Block, 

2"x2''xl3^" M- 255 89 

5 Neck Moulding .... M-8535 375 

6 Top Rail of Paneling M- 555 208 

7 Laminated Panel. . .M- 255 89 

8 Window Stool, 

M"xl%'\ M-8599 385 

9 Bottom Rail of 

Paneling M- 555 208 



Page 

10 Muntin M- 555 208 

11 Muntin M- 555 208 

12 Muntin Ornaments. M- 255 89 

13 Stile of Paneling M- 555 208 

14 Dentil Blocks M-255 89 

15 Dentil Blocks M-255 89 

16 Door Jamb M-8424 397 

17 Door Stop M-8095 379 

18 Base Moulding M-8740 396 

19 Base M-8828 397 

20 Base Shoe M-8422 397 



The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-712 
shown on page 260 



^ ^^^ 




Living Room M-256 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 Crown Moulding M-8533 376 

2 Cornice Soffit M-8394 384 

3 CorniceiMoulding M-8012 373 

4 Cornice Frieze M-8712 390 

5 Corner Trim M-8656 384 

6 Corner Trim M-8655 384 

7 Window Seat M-256 90 



Page 

8 Picture Moulding M-8262 383 

9 Base M-8426 397 

10 Base Shoe M-8535 375 

11 Back Band . .M-8368 390 

12 Casing M-8712 390 

13 Door Jamb, 5y/ wide.M-8424 397 

14 Door Stop M-8119 378 



The French Doors shown are Morgan design M-685 
shown on page 248 



df' 



rO 



8 



12 

KIO 



7^ 



1 

r 



I?'' 



12 



13 



14'- 



90 



^^ 




Living Room M-257 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 




U 



e^ ' 



F^ 



/] 



10 



i^dJ 



Page 

1 Cornice Soffit M-8711 390 

2 Cornice Moulding M-8014 373 

3 Cornice Frieze M-8711 390 

4 Corner Trim M-8712 390 

5 Corner Trim M-8712 390 

6 Window Stool M-8267 386 

7 Window Apron M-8641 383 



Page 

8 Picture Moulding M-8263 383 

9 Back Band M-8378 391 

10 Casing M-8306 391 

11 Door Jamb, 53^" wide.M-8424 397 

12 Door Stop .M-8542 379 

13 Base M-8386 392 

14 Base Shoe M-8422 397 



The French Doors in illustration are Morgan design M-730, 
glazed with Plain Sheet glass, shown on page 265 



"^ "^ ^ 



Hints Concerning Interior Decorations 

and Floor Covering 



From the Department of Interior Decorations 
Marshall Field & Company, Chicago 



The Drapery Desirable 

In planning the drapery for the windows 
of any rooms there are certain important 
factors to be considered. 

The Window Setting 

The relation of the window to the room 
should be the same as that of the picture 
frame to the picture; the window should 
furnish the proper setting: a strong feature 
of life and interest to the room it frames, but 
never to be over-emphasized so as to distract 
attention from its surroundings. 

The Lure of Light 

The first vital reason for the existence of 
a window is for light and air: the moment a 
drapery defeats this object, except in the 
degree to soften or mellow the light, the result 
is not satisfactory. 

The effect of sunlight and the open vista 
from a properly draped window cannot be 
over-estimated in the general atmosphere of 
a room. In country houses or where windows 
have a pleasing outlook into gardens, etc., 
special care should be taken to keep the space 
clear and free with simple glass curtains and 
side drapery. 

In the small city apartment also is this 
true where the effect to be desired is that of 
added space and light. 

The Casement Curtain 

Mullioned and leaded windows and also 
arched casements, have in themselves so 
much of decorative value that they should be 
kept free, without ornament: a light glass 
curtain and plain valance, with soft, straight, 
side hangings, which can be drawn across 
the entire window. 



Color Harmony 

The proper note of color may be supplied 
by the side hangings which should* be in 
harmony with the prevailing tones of rugs, 
walls, etc. Proper choice of color in drapery 
will hold and intensify light in a dull or somber 
room to a marked degree. Where the rugs 
and walls are plain and neutral, strong color 
and design may be used safely; whereas a 
soft, plain fabric in drapery will balance and 
tone highly-colored and figured covering and 
walls. 

Period Furnishing 

Copies of fine work from abroad are now 
obtainable in many lovely fabrics; and the 
popularity of Period Furniture in this country 
in recent years must be considered in drapery 
also. 

For instance, one would not use a delicate 
French hanging in a heavy Tudor or Eliza- 
bethan room. It is most important that the 
character of the individual room should be 
considered. What is very good taste in a 
public building or office is often unsuited for 
the home. 

Formal Drapery 

A formal air is insured in a room where 
the proper valances and lambrequins are 
used in rich and elegant material. Here 
again the shape, size, and style of the window 
in its relation to the room must determine 
the nature and material of the drapery. 

Trimming Taste 

Another important item is the trimming. 
The entire effect of an otherwise beautiful 
drapery may be completely spoiled by the 
wrong use of fringe, guimpe, etc. 

Piping and banding or plain linen in con- 
trasting color is more simple than fringe and 
adds greatly to figured drapery. 



=^^^ ^ 



Psychology of Color 

An important factor in choosing summer 
drapery is to keep in mind that cool greens, 
soft grays and all neutral colors are restful 
and fresh; while warm rich color combinations 
add greatly to the charm of the cozy winter 
home. 

Chamber Windows 

In chamber windows and rooms where 
windows are almost constantly open to the 
sun and air the draw curtains of casement 
cloth, sun fast, or soft silk or printed linen are 
both' decorative and practical. 

Where a single curtain is desired a soft linen 
or neutral for the exterior, with a colored 
lining in harmony with the color scheme of 
the room on the interior is very good. 

Panel Curtains 

For a formal room panel curtains add dis- 
tinction and elegance if properly worked out 
in relation to space, size, and the general style 
of the room. 

Brussels net is the preferred material for 
glass curtains and tempers the light when that 
is desirable. The trend of recent years is 
toward beauty of design and color harmony, 
while draperies as a whole are of more simple 
construction with less of the over decorated 
window trimming. 

Rug Reasoning 

Of all the furnishing which goes toward the 
creating of that elusive thing called '* charm'* 
in a home, perhaps there is no single detail so 
all-important as the floor-covering. 

The rug in any room should be the one 
dominant note which holds together the color, 
harmony and suitability of all the points of 
interest in the room as a whole. 

Romance of the Rug 

The rug weavers of the Orient have always 
known the importance and value of the floor- 
covering and therefore spent years of their 
lives weaving with infinite care and patience 
those masterpieces of color and line which 
gain in beauty with the passing of the years. 

The durability of the Oriental rug which is 
so unquestioned, is undoubtedly the product 
of excellent material which they use. 



Persia and Turkey, from whence come our 
most beautiful rugs, feed from their fertile 
fields the lambs and sheep whose wool is 
unsurpassed in quality. 

There are no chemicals used in coloring 
and the rare delicate color harmony which 
they produce is secured only through herbs, 
flowers, and bark. 

Even our domestic rugs which are made in 
large quantity draw their inspiration in design 
and color tones from these rugs of the Orient. 

The plain rug or carpet has grown in popu- 
larity in recent years, owing to the fact that 
it forms an excellent background for all types 
of furniture. 

When used in rich or neutral tones with 
occasional spots of color, supplied by the use 
of smaller and well selected Oriental rugs, it 
creates an atmosphere of beauty and charm. 

The Successful Sun-Room 

The sun-room or breakfast room is made 
both practical and attractive with the pleasing 
floors, or the lovely grass rugs which come 
now in a number of interesting designs and 
colors. 

The Charming Chamber 

In the bedroom there has been an increasing 
desire for the interesting old-fashioned braided 
or pulled rug of Colonial days. On a soft, 
rich background these well chosen rugs lend 
an air of distinction to the modern chamber. 

In the country house morning room or 
bedroom ingrain carpets of good color and 
the quaint hook rugs placed here and there 
become very cozy. 

Too much stress cannot be placed on the 
importance of the floor covering in relation to 
the size, shape and style in furnishing the 
room. 

A dark or poorly lighted room may gain 
in a remarkable degree, life and light from an 
Oriental rug which holds a glowing color in 
its depths, and that is why so many people 
add steadily to their collection of Orientals. 

They do not fade with the years, but give 
increasing beauty and comfort to the purchaser. 

The modern floor-covering unites all of the 
best features of service, beauty and comfort, 
and well merits the important position it 
occupies in interior furnishing. 



^^^L^ 



The Colonnade 

A Classical Heritage 



HTHE love of the colonnade or column effect 
in architecture is legendary. It has come 
down to us from the days of the Grecian amphi- 
theatre and temple. Yes, the use of the column 
extends back to the more obscure pages of history 
when primitive man was compelled to seek shelter 
under boughed roof supported by crude rustic 
columns. Indeed, the colonnade is an imitation 
of nature itself. No wonder then that in the 
modern home the colonnade lends such a pleasing 
suggestion of largeness, naturalness and comfort. 
The designs which follow are the results of com- 
prehensive experience — each one a modern inter- 
pretation of the classical — useful as well as 
ornamental. 



94 



^ "" ^ 




Colonnade M-300 

A BEAUTIFUL Colonial design which would enrich the 
-^"^ interior of any home. 

Opening 9' 10" between pilasters, 1' 0" high from finished 
floor to bottom of head jamb. Passageway 1' 0" between 
columns. 

Pilasters 12" face, 11" deep, 1' 0" long, made to fit an 
%%" jamb. Pilasters fluted on three sides. 

Columns 10" base, 1' 0" long. Fluted shaft. 

Head trim is a four member cabinet head with dentil 
blocks. 



95 



^^^ ^ 



w 




Colonnade M-301 



A 



STANDARD design which has been popular for many 

years. 



Opening between jambs 7' 6" wide, 7' 0" high from finished 
floor to bottom of head jamb. Passageway 3' 6" between 
pedestals. 

Pedestals 2' 6" wide, 2' 0" high, 8" deep. Made to fit 
a 534" jamb. 

Columns 6"x6"— 5' 0" long. 



96 



^^° y^=^ 




Colonnade M-302 



A USEFUL as well as an ornamental design. Notice 
that a drawer is provided beneath the leaded glass 
bookcases. 

Opening 9' 6' between jambs in width, height 7' 0" from 
finished floor to bottom of head jamb. Passageway 4' 2*'. 

Pedestals 3' 0^ wide, 4'0" high, ir deep, 9 H'' deep inside, 
doors glazed with Leaded Double Strength glass. Held 
in place with wood glass beads. 

Columns T x 7*^—3' 0" long. 

Suggest that a 73^" jamb be used for this colonnade. 



^ "" ^ 




Colonnade M-303 



TTERE is another attractive colonnade with an unusually 
J- ■■- large amount of book room. 



Opening 10' 0" between jambs. Passageway 4' 0". 
Height 7' 0" from finished floor to bottom of head jamb. 

Pedestals 3' 0'' wide, 4' 6" high, W2 deep, 7" deep inside, 
glazed with Plain glass. 

Columns 7" x 7"— tapered to 5" x 5"— 2' 0* long. 

Pilasters 7" x 3^"— tapered to 5" x 23^*'~2' 0" long. 

Beams 63^" deep, 6" high, 10' 0" long. 

Jambs required for this colonnade should be 1 1 3^" wide. 



98 



^. ^^ J^ 



I ' t ^^ 




Colonnade M-304 

T^HIS Morgan Standardized design offers a fine opportunity 
^ for tasty decoration with jardinieres, statuary, bric-a- 
brac, etc. 

Opening 10' 8" wide between jambs, 7' 0' high from 
finished floor to bottom of head jamb. Passageway 
3' 4" wide. 

Pedestals 3' 8" wide, 4' 0" high, llj^^ deep, 10" deep 
inside. 

Pilasters 53^" wide, 33^" deep, 2' 0" long. 

Base for Pilasters 1' 10" projection, 5" high, 5>^" wide. 

Beam 10' 8" long, 7" high, 53^" wide. 

Jamb 73^" wide should be used with this colonnade. 



^^^ ^ 




Cased Opening M-305 

TTERE is another variation of the Colonial pattern. Like 
-^ -^ all Colonials, this one is most effective when finished 
in white or ivory enamel. 

Opening 5' 0' wide between jambs, height from finished 
floor to bottom of head jamb 7' 0". 

Width of pilasters 6'. Height of head trim 12*. 

Unless otherwise ordered, will furnish only two pedestals 
and trim for one side of opening. 



^^«. 100^ 



' mam 




Cased Opening M-306 

^HIS one, as are all others shown in this book, is built 
•^ of Morgan Standardized parts. 

Opening 6' 0" x 7' 0". 

Pilasters 7" x 7"— 7' 0" long, made to fit a S^" wall. 



101 



^"^ ^ 




Colonnade M-307 

AS YOU will readily notice, the desk section is the feature 
' of this design. This desk section can be suppHed for 
several of the foregoing colonnades also. 

Opening 10' 0" between jambs, 7' 0" from finished floor 
to bottom of head jamb. 

Pedestals are 3' 0" wide, 4' 0" high, 113^" wide, 10" deep 
inside. 

Columns are 8"x8^ tapered to 6"x6'— 3' 0" high. 

Specify on which side the writing desk is wanted whan 
facing desk. 



^«.102 j^ 




Colonnade M-308 

A PLAIN but artistic and substantial colonnade showing 
-^^ china cases instead of bookcases in the pedestals. 

Opening 10' 2" between jambs. Passageway 4' 11*'. 
Height 7' 0" from finished floor to bottom of head jamb. 
Pedestals 3' 0" wide, 4' 6" high, 15" deep, 133^" deep 
inside, doors glazed with Leaded Double Strength glass. 
Pedestals made to fit a 73^" jamb. 
Columns 73^" x 7}^" x 2' 6" high. 



=^'^ ^ 




Colonnade M-309 



npHE arrangement of the columns in this design gives a 
^ strictly Colonial effect, with the advantages of two 
generous sized bookcases. 

Opening IT 8" wide between jambs, 7' 0" high from 
finished floor to bottom of head jamb. 

Pedestals 3' 4" wide, 4' 0" high, 123^" deep, 11" deep 
inside. 

Doors glazed Leaded Double Strength. 

Columns 8" x 8" at base, 6' 9" long over-all. 

Jamb 73^* wide should be used with this colonnade. 



104 



-^ 




Colonnade M-310 



A MISSION pattern with ample book room. 
-^"^ of Morgan Standardized parts. 



Built entirely 



Opening 9' 10" between jambs, 1' 0'^ high from floor to 
bottom of head jamb. Passageway 3' 6" wide. 
Pedestals 3' 2" wide, 4' 0" high, W2 deep inside. 
Posts 6" X 6"— 3' 0". Paneled four sides. 
ly^ jamb required for this colonnade. 



"^ ^"^^ 




Colonnade M-311 

TIT HERE the more open type of colonnade is not desirable, 
^^ this one will make a more distinct separation between 
the rooms. 

Opening 10' 0* wide between jambs, 7' 0* high from 
finished floor to bottom of head jamb, passageway 4' 0". 
Pedestals 3' 4" wide, 5' 6" high. 914" deep inside. 
Posts 6W X 6Ji" at bottom, 1' 0'' high. 
Pilasters 63^*^ x 4W at bottom, V 0" high. 
Beam 10' 0' long, 6' high, 4W thick. 



^^^^^Q^ ^ 




Colonnade M-312 



A 



VERY pleasing effect could be obtained by using 
statuette on the top of the pedestals of this design. 



Opening 10' 0" wide between jamb» 7' 0" high from floor 
to bottom of head jamb. Passageway 4' 0" wide. 

Pedestals 3' 4" wide, 4' 8" high, 4' 0'' from floor to top 
of counter, 8'' deep inade. 

Arch 10' 0" long, 1' 2" drop, 3" thick. 

Brackets 3'^" projection, 8" drop, 3" thick. 



^ ^"^^ 




Colonnade M-313 



AS WILL be seen from the foregoing pages, Morgan 
^^^ Standardized parts offer almost limitless combinations 
for attractive colonnade effects. 

Opening 8' 0" wide between jambs, 7' 0" high from 
finished floor to bottom of head jamb. 
Pedestals 2' 0" wide, 2' 0'^ high. 
Columns 6" x 6"~5' 0" long. Plain shaft. 



=^^""^ 



An. 





346 



347 



Hall-Marks of Good Taste 



A MONG heirlooms, few are more highly prized than *' grandfather's clock''— 
-^^ that tall, dignified, venerable sentinel of time. 

Long and eagerly have the old homes been ransacked for these sturdy 
representatives of early America, and fortunate indeed are the homes which 
are graced by their presence. 

Scarcely less favored are the possessors of worthy descendants of this 
time honored custom. Faithful modern interpretations reflect the inspiration 
of their classic forbears. Three examples appropriate for various types of 
interiors are shown here. 



^^22!^ 



Refuse to Be the Victim 
of Substitution 



COMETIMES regard for the quality of wood- 
work and the reputation of the maker thereof 
is overlooked, thereby endangering safety and 
satisfaction. 

Such errors frequently go on without dis- 
covery until all the woodwork has been fitted and 
installed. It then may be too late to correct. 

Replacement involves the expenditure of time 
and money. And, even if the cash expense might 
in some instances not be large, the lost time could 
never be recovered, and the marks of mutilation 
might be apparent to remind you of what could 
have been, had our advice been followed^ 

"Look for the 'Morgan' brand on every door 
and all woodwork before accepting." 
This is your safeguard. 




^^^^^^^^ 



Look Well to the Planning of the 

Dining Room 



JF ANY room of the home deserves careful 
planning, it is the dining room. For it is 
here that all members of the family must assemble 
daily whether or not there is time for the enjoy- 
ment of the rest of the house. And it is in the 
dining room where the guests receive their deepest 
impressions of the home. It is the throne room 
of the hostess. Is there a woman who does not 
take the greatest pride in her dining room? 
But as in all things of the home, the charm of 
the dining room is more dependent upon the 
proper selection than upon the cost of its appoint- 
ments—taste is more important than expenditure. 
We show on the succeeding pages a number 
of artistic dining room designs which include a 
wealth of suggestions for built-in buffets, wall 
paneling, etc. 



-s"^^ 




Dining Room M-350 



T^E SEE from the illustration above what attractive possi- 
^ ▼ bilities there are in the use of wall paneling for the dining 
room. Here the paneling is an attractive feature of the room 
and imparts a richness which could not be given by any other 
wall finish. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Wainscot Cap M-8256 

2 Cove Moulding M-8060 

3 Top Rail of Paneling... M- 555 

4 Panel Moulding M-8620 

5 Laminated Panel M- 350 



Page 




382 


6 


376 


7 


208 


8 


381 


9 


112 


10 



Base Moulding M-8740 

Base, 53^" wide M-8415 

Base Shoe M-8422 

Door Jamb, 53^" wide.M-8424 
10 Door Stop. M-8542 



Page 
396 
396 
396 
397 
379 



It 



Ih 



=-^''' ^ 




Dining Room M-351 



m 



^' T 




]4 



1? 



TX7E SHOW on this page another unusually attractive dining 
^ ' room in which the pattern of the wall paneling has been 
carried out in the door and in the beautiful built-in buffet. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pa^es 
indicated in last column. 



i 



X^^ 



5 16 

5 I 17 U 



Page 

1 Wainscot Cap M-8660 384 

2 Bed Moulding M-8019 374 

3 Top Rail of Paneling. . . M- 556 208 

4 Neck Moulding M-8611 380 

5 Laminated Panel M-351 113 

6 Muntins M- 556 208 

7 Dust Cap M-8282 377 

8 Crown Moulding M-8011 373 

9 Fillet M-8614 380 



Page 

10 Cove M-8060 376 

11 Head Casing, 53^" wideM-8424 397 

12 Ceiling Cove M-8016 375 

13 Cedling Moulding M-8614 380 

14 Bottom Rail of Paneling M- 556 208 

15 Base M-8828 397 

16 Stiles of Paneling M- 556 208 

17 Door Jamb, 5}4' wide.M-8424 397 



113 



^^ill^ 



i\iA 




H^. rhm v^ -im^^mw^-^ -^^^--s-' 



Dining Room M-352 

TTERE is a dining room which has been made attractive on 
^ ^ a nominal expenditure. The home plans on preceding 
pages show several in which a sun porch adjoins the dining 
room, as in this illustration. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 

Page Page 

1 Base M-8828 397 4 Casing M-8309 391 

2 Base Shoe M-8422 397 5 Door Jamb, 5}4" wide . . . M-8424 397 

3 Panel Strips M-8281 377 

The Door shown in illustration is Morgan design M-900 
on page 276 



U^2 c 



114 



^"^ ^ 




Dining Porch M-353 



n^HINK of the pleasure of dining on a sun porch Uke this. 
^ It would soon become a favorite spot in the home because 
it would be a cheerful one. Moreover, it would save much 
work in keeping up the home during the hot months. 



^D 



Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last colunnn. 



7 



1 Door Stop M-8542 

2 Door Jamb, 53^" wide . . . M-8424 

3 Casing M-8308 

4 Window Stop M-8541 



Page 

379 
397 
388 
379 



5 Base .M-8828 

6 Base Shoe .M-8422 

7 Window Stool M-8599 

8 Mullion Casing M-8625 



Page 
397 

397 
385 
382 



115 



^^''^ ^ 




Dining Room M-354 



HERE again is an interesting example of what can be accom- 
plished by using Morgan Standardized Woodwork. The 
mantel, with wall recess above, and the large sideboard are 
useful as well as ornamental additions to this room. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



1 Built-up Mantel Shelf.. M- 354 

2 Fillet M-8432 

3 Bed Moulding M-8115 

4 Mantel Shelf Apron.,. .M-8424 

5 Neck Moulding M-8610 

6 Ceiling Moulding M-8018 

7 Door Jamb, 53^" wide. M-8424 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

116 
398 
378 
384 
380 
374 
397 



8 Door Stop M-8542 

9 Casing M-8309 

10 Base M-8828 

11 Base Shoe M-8422 

12 Stile of Mantel Shelf.. .M- 354 

13 Casing M- 354 



Page 

379 
388 
397 
397 
116 
116 



Both Doors in illustration are Morgan design M-711, 
shown on page 260 



r 



:i5 



13 



'^ 



IZ] 



10 



: iidJ 



^ne^^ 




Dining Room M-355 



6 



TTERE indeed is a dining room wFiich bears the unmistakable 
^ ^ stamp of good taste in every detail of its appointments— 
from the artistic buffet, china closet and table, to the well-chosen 
Morgan French Doors and Trim. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Picture Moulding M-8263 

2 Door Stop M-8542 

3 Door Jamb, 53^" wide M-8424 

4 Casing M-8308 

5 Back Band .M-8374 

6 Window Stool M-8267 



Page 

383 
379 
397 
391 
390 
386 



7 Window Apron M-864 1 

8 Thresholds M-8278 

9 Base, ^" x 53^" M-8828 

10 Base Shoe M^422 

11 Chair Rail M-8626 



Page 
383 
387 
397 
397 
382 



_2llo 



The Panel Door in illustration is Morgan design M-800, with No. 1 

White Pine Stiles and Rails and Unselected 

Gum Panels, shown on page 266. 



117 



^^ill^ 





Dining Room M-356 



n^HIS is a neat, plain and artistic room, showing that Morgan 
J- Standardized Woodwork finished in white enamel makes 
even the plainest dining room attractive. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Cap Moulding, 2' M-8717 

2 Head Casing M-8359 

3 Plate Rail Shelf M-356 

4 Plate Rail Apron M- 356 

5 Base M-8426 



Page 




392 


6 


390 


7 


118 


8 


118 


9 


397 


10 



Base Shoe M-8422 

Casing M-8290 

Door Jamb. 53^" wide.M-8424 

Door Stop M-8542 

10 Picttire Moulding M-8265 



Page 

397 
388 
397 
379 
383 



The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-707, 
shown on page 257 



(?. 



:f 



6^ 



/ 



"^"« ^ 




Buffet M-365 



COMPLETE buffet includes one adjustable shelf in compartments 
back of each door. Genuine Polished Plain Plate mirrors above 
counter. 

Over-all size 6' 6" long by 3' 8" high. Depth inside 1' 4". Height 
from floor to top of counter 3' 2\ 
Built in all woods. 



^^U9^ 




Buffet M-366 



COMPLETE buffet includes one adjustable shelf in compartments 
back of paneled and sash doors. Genuine Bevel Plate mirrors 
above counter and Leaded Art glass in sash doors. 

Over-all size of buffet 7' 0" wide by 4' 8" high. Inside depth 1' 5". 
Height from floor to counter shelf 3' 0". 
Built in all woods. 



=^ I^Qa^ 




Sideboard M-367 

COMPLETE sideboard includes six adjustable shelves for compart- 
ment back of doors. Genuine Bevel Plate mirrors at back and 
sides of space above counter shelf and Leaded Art glass in sash doors. 
Over-all size of sideboard (not including trim) 6' IJ^" wide, 7' 0^'' 
high. Inside depth 1' 3". Height from floor to top of counter shelf 
3' 2". Space above counter shelf T 2" high. 

Rough opening required 6' 2)4" wide by 7' \%" high, 1' 5" deep. 
Built in all woods. 



"V. 121,^ 



M 




Sideboard M-368 



COMPLETE sideboard includes two adjustable shelves in upper 
section, two adjustable shelves in lower section, plain Double 
Strength for sash doors and Genuine Bevel Plate mirror above counter. 
Over-all size, including trim, 6' 6" wide by 7' A^" high. Inside 
depth of bottom section V 9\ Inside depth of top section 1' 3''. Height 
from floor to top of counter 3' 2". Space above counter 1' 2" high. 
Rough opening required 6' 1" wide by 7' 23^" high, 1' 5" deep. 
Built in all woods. 



=^^^^ ^ 




Sideboard M-369 



COMPLETE sideboard includes one adjustable shelf in compartment 
back of each paneled door, two adjustable shelves for upper section, 
Art glass in doors of top section and Genuine Bevel Plate mirror in back 
of space above counter. 

Over-all measure of case (not including trim) 5' Xyi' wide by 7' 0^" 
high. Inside depth 1' 3". 

Height from floor to top of counter 3' 2". Space above counter 
1' T high. 

Rough opening required 5' 23^" wide by 7' 1^" high, V A}4" deep 

Built in all woods. 



^123 ^^^= 






I 




'.^■^-j--^^s>i^^>^:^ 



Buffet M-370 

COMPLETE buffet includes Leaded Double Strength glass for sash 
doors in lower section, one adjustable shelf in compartment back 
of each sash door, Genuine Beveled Polished Plate mirror above counter 
10'' high, paneled soffit and paneled sides and trim for triple frame. 

Over-all size (not including back band trim) 6' SW wide by 6' 8^" 
high. Inside depth 1' 3\ 

Rough opening required, 6' 6}4" wide by 6' 9^' high, 1' 4}4" deep. 
Built in all woods. 



^^ifL^ 




Buffet M-371 

COMPLETE buffet includes two adjustable shelves for lower section, 
Genuine Polished Bevel Plate mirror 12'' high above counter, 
Leaded Double Strength glass for sash doors, paneled back, soffit and 
sides. 

Over-all size (not including trim) 6' 73^" wide by 6' 8^" high. Inside 
depth r 3". 

Height from floor to top of counter 3' 0". 

Rough opening required 6' 8}i" wide by 6' 9%' high, V 5" deep. 

Built in all woods. 



^^i!i^ 




Sideboard M-372 

COMPLETE sideboard includes Plain Double Strength glass in sash 
doors, one adjustable shelf in compartment back of each panel 
door, Genuine Polished Bevel Plate mirror above counter, cap trim and 
baseboard. 

Over-all size of sideboard 6' 0" wide, 7' V/g" high. Inside depth of 
lower section 1' IT'. Inside depth of upper section 11". 

Height from floor to top of counter 3' 4". Space above counter 
V 8" high. 

Rough opening required 5' 8" wide by 6' 9%" high, V V deep. 

Built in all woods. 



126 



^J±^ 




Sideboard M-373 

COMPLETE sideboard includes Plain Double Strength glass in 
upper doors. Genuine Polished Bevel Plate mirror above counter. 
One adjustable shelf back of each door in lower section. 

Over-all size 5' 6" wide by 7' 6' high. Bottom section 1' 4" deep. 
Top section 12'' deep. Open counter shelf 12" high. Bottom 3' 0" 
to top of counter shelf. 

Note sliding pass door above counter. Can also be set in recess 
if desired. Built in all woods. 



127 



^^^' ^ 



ir 




Sideboard M-374 






COMPLETE sideboard includes one adjustable shelf in each china 
compartment and Genuine Polished Plain Plate mirror, Leaded 
Double Strength glass in sash doors in upper section. 

Over-all size 6' 6" long by 5' 10'' high. Inside depth of lower section 
r 5", inside depth of upper section 11". 
Height from floor to top of counter 3' 0". 
Built in all woods. 



Hii 



128 



^^^°^ 




China Case M-375 

COMPLETE china case includes three adjustable shelves in upper 
section, one adjustable shelf in lower section, Leaded Double 
Strength glass m sash doors and Genuine Polished Plain Plate mirrors 
above counter. 

Over-all size (not including trim) 3' U// wide by 7' OM' high. Inside 
depth at center 9^ 

Height from floor to counter 3' 0". Space above counter 1' 0" high. 
Built in all woods. 



129 



^ ''"-^ 




Buffet M-376 

COMPLETE buffet includes Leaded Art glass in sash doors and 
Genuine Polished Plate mirror above counter, one adjustable 
shelf back of each door. 

Over-all size 5' 6" wide by 4' 8" high, 1' 6" deep, 3' 0" high from 
floor to top of counter. 
Built in all woods. 




Buffet M-377 

COMPLETE buffet includes one adjustable shelf in compartment 
back of each door. 
Over-all size 5' 6" wide by 3' 8" high, 1' 6" deep, 3' 0" from floor 
to top of counter. 

Built in all woods. 

Note the furniture effect of this buffet. 



/ 



^^ "-^^^ 




Buffet M-378 

COMPLETE buffet includes Leaded Art glass in sash doors and 
one adjustable shelf in compartment back of eaclh door 

to?^ ofcotter' '" "'"' ^' '' '" ''''''' '' ^' ''^^' ^' ^' ^^^ «-r 
Built in all woods. 




Buffet M-379 

pOMPLETE buffet includes Double Strength glass in doors 

!:5reaXfbr^tf^d'o?rr' ^^^^^ ™^ above^counk twS afe 

of?ounter 3^r. ^' ^' *'"'" ^^ ^' ^' ^'«^' 1' «' deep, height to top 

Can also be made to fit in recess if desired. Built in all woods. 



Have a Breakfast Nook 
in Your Home if Possible 



\7^0U will never regret including a breakfast nook 
in your plans. And be sure that it is bright, 
sunny and cheerful, made according to the sizes 
we show for the several designs, to obtain the 
greatest amount of comfort and service. 

Think of the work a breakfast nook saves. It 
is usually an alcove near the kitchen. Those 
tiresome trips to the dining room are avoided 
in the morning, at least. Tablecloths may be 
dispensed with if desired; it is so delightfully in- 
formal. Early and late risers can be accommodated 
without especial inconvenience. Several attractive 
styles are shown on the following pages. 



=^'-''^ 




Breakfast Nook M-390 

/^AN you imagine how much a cheerful nook like this would be 
^^-^ used— not alone for breakfast but for other purposes as well? 

In planning this breakfast nook, care should be taken 
that the following sizes apply. 

Alcove 6' 0'' wide. Window at least 3' 7" from floor. 

Table top 2' 6" wide x 4' 10" long, 2' 6" high. Seats 
over-all measure 1' 6" wide, 5' 0" long, 3' 8" high. 



^"■^ ^ 






fe«lMira:;::;;»j:,»j;rM.:H^ 



^^fe. 



'^"^m^^^^^mm^rwr^^x^m^^^m^' 



'^^^'w^^ mm F^i 



Breakfast Nook M-391 



TTERE is one done in immaculate white enamel which is 
^ A always appropriate, sanitary and easy to keep clean. 

The following sizes should be followed to get the best 
results. 

Alcove 6' 0" wide. Window at least 3' 6" from floor. 

Table top 2' 6" wide by 4' 6" long, 2' 6" high. Seat 
over-all measures 1' 6" wide, 5' 0" long, 3' 6" high. 



^^^^^ 




Breakfast Nook M-392 



TN PLANNING a breakfast nook, be sure to place it on 
^ the sunny side of the house so that it will be cheerful as 
well as useful. 

The alcove for this breakfast nook should be made not 
over 6' 0" wide, window at least 4' 2" from floor. Table 
top 2' 6" wide by 4' 6" long, 2' 6'' high. Seat over-all 
measure 1' 6" wide by 4' 8" long, 4' 0" high. 



135 



^^ ^^^ ^ 




Breakfast Nook M-393 



n^HIS one is done in plain lines to harmonize with a home 
■^ of this t3^pe. 

Alcove not to exceed 6' 0" in width ; window to be at least 
3' 6" above floor. Table top 2' 6" wide by 4' 6" long, 
2' 6" high. Seats over-all measure 1' 6" wide by 4' 8" 
long, 2' 8" high. 



==\.'''^ 




Breakfast Nook M-394 

TT WOULD be hard to find a more artistic nook than the 
^ one shown above. Notice that the seats may be uphol- 
stered to harmonize with the adjoining room. The china 
case under the window will not come amiss. 

Best results obtained by following these sizes: 
Alcove 6' 0" wide ; window at least 3' 6" from floor. Table 
top 2' 6'^ wide by 5' 0'^ long, 2' 6" high. Seat over-all 
measure 1' 6" wide by 5' 0" long, 3' 6" high. China case 
6' 0" wide by 1' 0" deep, 1' 0" high. 



137 



^^■^^^ 




Sun Porch M-398 



i^r: 



[/. 



40 



n 



u 



n^HE value of a sun porch is too apparent to need comment. 
-*" We show this one merely to call your attention to the fact 
that Morgan Standardized Woodwork can be adapted to any 
style or size of porch. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Cove M-8061 

2 Cornice Moulding M-8091 

3 Cornice Apron M-8712 



Page 
376 

378 
390 



4 Window Stop. . 

5 Casing 

6 Mullion Casing. 



Page 

.M-8540 379 
.M-8308 388 
.M-8309 388 



^^^^^^ 




THE well-known, authentic, interior color har- 
monies, produced by the publishers of Good 
Furniture Magazine, are used in this work, so 
that Assurance in Building may be extended to 
assurance in furnishing the home. 

We have reproduced four typical color har- 
monies from their portfolio "How to Select Fur- 
nishings for the Home" to be a guide to home 
makers in selecting furnishings that harmonize 
in color and design. 



These Furniture Designs 

Contributed By 

Berkey & Gay Furniture Company 



139 



^ 



The A B C of 
Furniture Selection 



Appropriateness, Beauty and Comfort 



'T^HE average home owner contemplates 
-1- with consternation the furnishing of a 
home. It is no small task to select the many 
articles of furniture, especially for one un- 
trained in the subject, and usually requires no 
end of study and consultation with recognized 
authorities. Nevertheless, a few simple rules 
on the subject will help anyone undertaking 
the delightful task of furnishing a home. 

The A B C of furniture selection may well 
be expressed in three words— ^Appropriateness, 
Beauty and Comfort. If each piece of furni- 
ture chosen for the home is selected with these 
three attributes in mind, the result should be 
entirely pleasing. 

The effect of very attractive and worthy 
furniture may be destroyed by its lack of 
appropriateness for the setting in which it is 
used. The association of a sturdy Mission 
chair and a graceful Adam table, for instance, 
can result only in a lack of harmony and a 
comparison obviously to the disadvantage of 
both pieces. This does not mean that all of 
the furniture entering into one room should be 
en suite or even of similar design. Such a 



selection produces an uninteresting and char- 
acterless effect. For real individuality there 
should be a selection of varied designs with 
a care to their harmony when associated to- 
gether in the same room. 

Such selection should also take into con- 
sideration the architectural features of the 
room, the design and color of the rugs, draper- 
ies, pictures and various accessories which 
enter into the ensemble. 

To carry the matter to its logical conclusion, 
furniture to be appropriate should suit the 
personality of the owner. 

Several years ago a newly-made millionaire 
purchased for his four-year-old daughter a bed 
room suite of heavy design in Circassian wal- 
nut with profuse metal trimmings! It is not 
difficult to understand that the child's sur- 
roundings in her own room did not contribute 
favorably to her attitude of mind. 

It is sometimes difficult to analyze the beauty 
of a piece of furniture. Frequently, beauty is 
such a fine adjustment of many elements enter- 
ing into the design and construction that it 
seems to be an abstract and elusive thing. 



r ll f llifiift M 




Living Rcom Furniture 



=^''^ ^ 








/ / 




Living Room Furniture 



141 



^ '^'^- 



However, it is always possible to consider 
several broad requirements of beautiful furni- 
ture which are a safe guide for the home 
furnisher. 

Perhaps of greatest importance is the matter 
of proportion. It has been said that ''propor- 
tion is the good breeding of architecture/' It 
is equally true of furniture. Much furniture 
depends solely on its proportions for its attrac- 
tiveness. 

Ornament, judiciously applied, will enhance 
the beauty o,i furniture, but no amount of 
ornament can effectually conceal the ill pro- 
portions of an unfortunate design. 

Color applied to furniture by means of 
enamels and stains is an effective means of 
obtaining individuality in the home. It has 
the added virtue of contributing a light- 
hearted, informal atmosphere. Such an envi- 
ronment is especially desirable in children's 
rooms. By means of color, especially in furni- 
ture, we are getting still farther away from 
the sepulchral chill of our grandmother's ''par- 
lor." More than anything else, a carefully 
selected color scheme (such as those found on 
pages 148-149, 152-153) will aid in the fur- 
nishing of a cheerful, happy, livable room, 
designed to enhance the attractiveness of the 
entire home. 

If a selection of period furniture is desired, 
it is well to make sure that the particular style 
chosen is sympathetically and correctly inter- 



preted. There is much Iperiod furniture, so 
called, which is unworthy of the name. But 
authentic reproductions and original designs 
inspired by the master cabinet-makers of the 
past can be obtained from a few well-known 
manufacturers. 

The third requirement of furniture selection 
— comfort — is no less important than the other 
two. A piece of furniture can be neither 
appropriate nor beautiful, in the strict sense 
of the word, if it lacks in practical utility. 
Obviously, the first consideration should be 
utility. For instance, it is often possible in 
selecting a table to make a gate-leg serve two 





Library Furniture 



^^'^ ^ 



purposes where another design could serve 
but one. Common sense should dictate here 
very largely in the general type of furniture 
chosen. 

Seating furniture, chairs, settees, davenports 
and benches, should be suited to the physical 
requirements of the people for whom they are 
selected. Tradition designates father's chair 
as a large overstuffed piece and mother's chair 
as a small rocker. Perhaps in your individual 
case the very opposite would be more appro- 
priate. 

These three factors — appropriateness, beauty 
and comfort — may be applied to the selection 
of furniture for each room in the home. In 
this connection there are various outstanding 
features to be considered for each room. 

It is important that the entrance hall, inas- 
much as the room is somewhat formal in char- 
acter, be correctly furnished, for here it is that 
your guests gain the first impressions of your 
home. If you have no clothes closet, other 
provision may be made for your guests' wraps 



in suitable furniture. A chair or two will be 
found convenient, and a console with drawer 
and cupboard space and a mirror to harmonize 
are a necessity. 

The living room, as its name implies, 
should be the most livable room in the house. 
Comfort for every member of the family and 
attractiveness are the two prime requisites in 
a living room. Here a combination of various 
harmonious styles tends to make the room 
more livable by engendering an informal en- 
vironment. Easy chairs, a davenport with 
shaded lights close by, musical instruments, a 
fireplace properly equipped for the winter 
evenings — these are indicative of the character 
of the furnishings to be selected for a real 
living room. 

The library is a workshop and should be 
furnished accordingly. Although it is a man's 
office at home, care should be taken that it 
does not suggest a business office. Provision 
must be made for writing and study. Lighting 
fixtures should be chosen for their adherence 






Dining Room Furniture 



144 



^^J21^ 



to the principles of scientific light distribution. 
Easy chairs, book shelves, a desk, and even 
filing devices, all may be selected with the 
thought of their use paramount, but with a 
vigilance not to allow them to destroy the 
home atmosphere. 

A formal hospitality should be expressed in 
the dining room. The requirements of the room 
are favorable for this. The furniture is best 
selected en suite unless unusual conditions make 
a diversified selection of value. In addition to 
the regulation dining suite, consisting of a 
table, six chairs, bufi*et, serving table and silver 
cabinet, there are other pieces which have a 
practical and attractive value, such as the tea 
wagon, fernery, corner cupboard and a leather 
screen before the service door. 

The bed room is capable of a varied treat- 
ment. As the private domain of a member 
of the household, it is the most individual and 
distinctive room in the home. Here the 
owner's personality has free reign and the 
furnishings should be in keeping with that 
personality. It is possible to obtain furniture 



decorated with Mother Goose characters which 
will delight the heart of a child. The young 
lady is equally pleased with a dainty suite in 
enamel, while the grown son of the family can 
rightly demand something sturdy and mascu- 
line in character. A man's room should have 
plenty of drawer room for his various articles 
of clothing. Milady will appreciate such 
pieces as the vanity dresser with its conven- 
ient mirrors, a writing desk and the small but 
convenient slipper chair. 

If the bed room is to be a guest room, there 
should be no striking individuality to the 
room except as it reflects the character of the 
home itself. Emphasis should be laid on 
providing every comfort for the guest, not 
only in the selection of the furniture, but in 
the choice of the many small accessories which 
bespeak the thoughtfulness of the hosts. 
The guest room should be expressive of the 
hospitality and welcome accorded the guest 
and should be furnished so that the guest will 
haye the maximum of independence in his 
own room. 





A-A 



B-B 



Bed Room Furniture 



146 



"^^ ^ 



Blue and Old Gold for the Living Room 





Color Scheme No. 1 — For description see page 150 



148 




Mulberry and Tan; Blue and Gray for Hall and Adjoining Rooms 




Color Scheme No. 19 — For description see page 150 



149 



Color Harmony 

Four color schemes selected from the portfolio 
"How to Select Furnishings for the Home'* 

In planning the decoration of a room, the color harmony is a first consideration. The most beautiful furniture 
will lose half its charm if placed against a background of ugly wall paper or ill chosen rugs. Even a kalsomined wall 
and a modest rug, selected with understanding, will produce a more harmonious result than costly but inartistic paper 
and Oriental carpet which violates the rules of harmony. While it is a mistake to carry a color scheme to the point of 
monotony, it is quite as bad to have no color scheme at all. 



Color Scheme No. 1 

Blue and Old Gold for the Living Room 

The blue and old gold scheme illustrated 
on page 148 is cool in effect. It is most 
pleasing when applied to a living room of 
southern or western exposure. The floor should 
match the woodwork, which should be stained 
in a rich dark shade. The plain taupe Wilton 
rug should cover the floor within 18 inches of 
the baseboard, to make a telling background 
for the furniture. 

The wall covering is planned to be a blue 
and old gold grasscloth, with a plain taupe 
ceiling, either papered or kalsomined. If the 
room has few windows it may be greatly 
lightened by using pongee taupe paper on the 
walls instead of the grasscloth. In this case, 
the ceiling should be a little lighter than the 
walls and the woodwork painted the same tone 
as the ceiling. 

For casement curtains, plain cream scrim, 
cream voile or pongee silk may be used, accord- 
ing to the taste and pocketbook. For over- 
draperies there is a choice of blue silk rep or 
plain velour, the latter being used also for 
portieres, edged with gold cord. 

The figured velour chosen for the upholstery 
introduces a pleasing design and may be used 
by itself or in combination with the plain 
velour. Should tapestry be preferred, select 
a pattern in dull blues and greens on a black 
ground. 

A lamp-shade of figured silk, lined with 
**cloth of gold" and finished with heavy blue 
fringe, always makes a striking note of color 
in a living room. Gold silk may appear else- 
where, but should be used sparingly, as in 
lining a table scarf. 

Lighting fixtures and fireset should be of 
dull brass, mantel tiles greenish blue in matt 
finish. 

The quality of drapery and upholstery 
materials selected call for a corresponding 
quality in the furniture, which should be, pref- 



erably, brown mahoganized or walnut finish 
in Jacobean, William and Mary or Queen 
Anne style. Black lacquer could also be used 
effectively with this color scheme. 

KEY TO MATERIALS 

1. Figured silk in blue and old gold, with touches of pink, for lamp 
shade, table scarf or sofa cushion. 

Plain, old gold silk for light window curtains or lamp-shade lining. 
Three-eighths inch dull gold cord for drapery and upholstery 
trimmings- 

Blue and old gold, cut -pile velour, for furniture coverings. 
Dark blue silk for window draperies or portieres. 
Old blue velour for portieres or furniture coverings. 
Walnut stain or brown mahogany for door and window trimmings 
and floor. 

8. Grasscloth or paper for walls. 

9. Plain, domestic Wilton rug. 

Color Scheme No. 19 

Mulberry and Tan; Blue and Gray 
for Hall and Adjoining Rooms 

As the first impressi6n is received from the 
hall, it is important that the latter should 
have an air at once dignified yet delightfully 
hospitable. A hall may be made attractive 
through the use of foliage, scenic or tapestry 
paper, which will impart character and at the 
same time lead the eye pleasingly to the adjoin- 
ing rooms. On page 149 is suggested the 
transitional decorative treatment of a hall with 
rooms opening on either side. 

For the hall itself, has been selected a foliage 
paper, rather light in effect, in which gray and 
tan are blended with soft blue and mulberry. 
In the hall, either the gray or the tan in this 
paper could be emphasized by means of a 
plain ceiling in gray or tan and a runner of 
Wilton carpet. If tan be chosen for the ceiling 
it should be relieved with mulberry in the 
rug; if gray be chosen, with blue in the rug.* 
The woodwork should be enameled the same 
color as the ceiling. 

If the adjoining rooms are separated from 
the hall by French doors, Austrian draw cur- 
tains of natural or gray pongee silk could be 
used. Otherwise, use double-faced portieres, 
the hall-side being blue or mulberry, according 
to the color selected for the hall scheme. 

For the hall, furniture distinctly different in 
design from that in the adjoining rooms should 



150 



==^ ^^^^ 



be selected; hall tables or consoles should be 
long and narrow, with separate mirrors of 
similar design; chairs high-backed, formal in 
style, used singly or in pairs and matching the 
console or not. If space permits, a bench, 
chest, or stately grandfather clock may be 
added. 

For the room on the north side of the hall 
the color scheme embraces warm tones, mul- 
berry and tan. Materials for hangings, uphol- 
stery and floor covering are suggested in the 
velour, damask and tan carpet. 

In the room on the opposite side of the hall 
the color scheme in blue and gray could be 
carried out. To effect a sense of unity through- 
out, there should be in each room just a sug- 
gestion of the color used in the other room. 



KEY TO MATERIALS 



Velour for upholstery in north room. 
Damask for draperies and portieres in north room. 
Blue window silk for draperies in south ro®m. 
Blue velour for upholstery in south room. 
Tan wall paper for north room. 
Figured paper for hall. 
. . Gray wall paper for south room. 

8. Tan Wilton rug for north room. 

9. Gray Wilton rug for south room. 



Color Scheme No. 12 

Mulberry and Gray for the Dining Room 

On page 152 is illustrated a mulberry and 
gray scheme which may be applied to a dining 
room of almost any exposure, as it combines 
both cool and warm tones. It is a delightful 
color scheme which lends itself readily to inex- 
pensive treatment. 

For floor covering a deep gray Wilton or 
linen rug could be used, its choice depending 
upon the style of the furniture selected. Should 
one have a good-sized Oriental rug, in which 
mulberry tones predominate, this would enter 
harmoniously into the scheme. 

The two-toned fine striped gray paper would 
give a pleasing background for the furniture 
and draperies. The woodwork should be 
either slightly lighter or slightly darker than 
the general tone of the walls, but the ceiling 
must be lighter. 

The window curtains should be of fine white 
voile or net, with over-draperies of richly col- 
ored cretonne. The deep tones of mulberry in 
the latter could be effectively emphazied by 
lambrequins and broad, loose tie-backs of 
mulberry rep. The rep could also be used 
for portieres and for covering the chair seats. 
Another interesting and durable material for 
dining room upholstery is haircloth, lately 
brought out in many beautiful colors and de- 



signs. The piece illustrated is dark mulberry 
with a small woven pattern. 

Dull Holland blue is the contrasting note 
to be brought out in this scheme and it may 
appear in lamp-shades of the changeable mul- 
berry and blue silk, shirred and edged with 
plain blue chenille fringe. A piece of dull blue 
pottery would help to bring out the needed 
color note. Fireplace bricks showing dull 
purplish tones, a fireset of wrought iron and 
lighting fixtures of French gray would all add 
to the effectiveness of the scheme. 

Because of the mulberry tones in this scheme, 
only mahogany, preferably red, should be 
used. As to style, there is a wide range among 
the Georgian and Colonial suites or Chippen- 
dale, Hepplewhite, Sheraton and American 
Empire lines. William and Mary or Queen 
Anne furniture could also be used. 

KEY TO MATERIALS 

1. Patterned haircloth for chair seats. 

2. Silk for shade covering. 

3. Velour for covering chair seats. 

4. Cretonne, printed rep, for over-draperies. 

5. Plain rep for curtain tie-backs and lambrequins or for portieres 
and chair seats. 

6. Eggshell finish for woodwork. 

7. Two-toned striped wall paper. 

8. Plain domestic Wilton rug. 

9. Plain domestic linen rug. 

Color Scheme No. 4 

Corn Yellow for the Bed Room 

The decorative treatment of a poorly lighted 
room, or one of northern exposure, presents a 
special problem. With such a room in view 
a cheerful scheme in corn yellow has been 
planned. The materials to carry out the 
scheme are illustrated on page 153. 

A large rug, either linen or Wilton, according 
to the amount to be expended, in golden brown 
would look best on a birch floor finished natural 
color and waxed. If preferred, three smaller 
rugs, selected according to floor space, could 
be used. 

The fine, satin-stripe paper in two tones of 
soft yellow and a plain ceiling paper just a 
little lighter will give the effect of sunshine in 
the room. Either flat paint or kalsomine in 
the same tints could be used instead of paper. 
The woodwork should be enameled satin finish, 
the same tint as the ceiling. 

Cream marquisette or scrim makes pretty 
window curtains and over these should be hung 
curtains of cretonne showing yellow flowers 
and touches of green and pale turquoise blue. 
The finishing braid, in which these colors 
appear, gives a pleasing touch to the over- 
draperies. The same cretonne could be used 
for a couch cover or for cushions in a wicker 



"^^151 ,^ 



m 



Mulberry and Gray for the Dining Room 







Color Scheme No. 12 — For description see page 151 



152 



Corn Yellow for the Bed Room 




Color Scheme No, 4 — For description see page 151 



153 



chair. To avoid the mistake of using too much 
cretonne, the duplex damask of plain yellow 
should be brought into the scheme, as covering 
for an easy chair. This would also make a 
good cushion for a cretonne-covered couch, 
together with one of dull turquoise blue. Blue 
is, in this case, the contrasting note needed in 
every decorative scheme to prevent monotony. 

The ivory enameled lighting fixtures are 
recommended and should include one or two 
dainty bed room lamps fitted with exquisite 
little shades in yellow and blue. 

As this scheme has been planned with the 
prime object of producing the effect of light 



and cheerfulness, the furniture also should be 
selected with the same idea in mind. Louis 
XVI of very simple design in ivory enamel, or 
painted furniture decorated with little nose- 
gays would be charming. If one prefers the 
natural finished wood, a walnut finish suite of 
rather light design would be in harmony. 

KEY TO MATERIALS 

1. Taffeta silk for lamp-shades. 

2. Velour for cushion or couch cover. 

3. Finishing braid for over-draperies. 

4. Three-tone figured cretonne for over-draperies and couch cover or 
cushions. 

5. Duplex damask covering for an easy chair. 

6. Satin enamel finish for woodwork. 

7. Satin-stripe wall paper in two tones. 

8. Domestic Wilton rug in standard sizes. 

9. Plain-tone linen rug in standard sizes. 



The Development of Furniture Design 



GOING back to the beginning of modern 
art, history tells that art was expressed 
through two main styles. The East was 
Byzantine and the West Romanesque. The 
Romanesque style of art eventually developed 
into Gothic. This Gothic style was naturally 
modified in each country by national influences, 
as, for instance, by the .Vloorish element in 
Spain. Italy clung to the Romanesque art, 
because the overmastering influence of the 
great classic productions and the national 
characteristics and tastes prevented the Gothic 
from being generally accepted. 

In Italy, about the year 1400, began the 
**Revival of Learning,'' a Renaissance of the 
classic spirit, an awakened interest in the liter- 
ature and art of the glory that was Greece and 
the grandeur that was Rome. This revival 
swept over all the civilized world excepting 
the most northern and eastern parts of Europe. 
This new-old art, however, did not entirely 
displace the styles in vogue in the different 
countries; it was, rather, accepted and grafted 
on to the basic designs in use. In France this 
blending of teachings became the Styles of 
Francois Premier and Henry II; in England it 
produced what we call the Elizabethan or 
Tudor. 

So we see that Elizabethan furniture and 
that of Renaissance France, Flanders, Italy, 
Spain and Portugal are all products of the 
same school — the result of the same spirit in 
design. Such a momentous impulse as that 
of the Renaissance does not soon exhaust 
itself. Indeed, the impulse has never sub- 
sided and is exceedingly active today. It has 
been partly obscured at times in some coun- 



tries, as in England in the reign of Queen Anne, 
when the Baroque influence became paramount. 
The architecture of England, both exterior and 
interior, never lost its classic feeling; however, 
it was in furniture design only that the classic 
was blended with the Jacobean and finally lost 
under the Baroque influence. 

The adaptability of Renaissance furnishings 
to our uses today may be gathered from its 
main characteristics. Perhaps its more out- 
standing qualities are spaciousness, dignity, for- 
mality and richness. Its earlier manifestations 
were marked by more simplicity and later by 
increasing magnificence. That its qualities are 
not inconsistent with home feeling today is 
shown by its use in American homes. 

The next infiuence we have to consider is the 
Romantic, which, as its name suggests, is emo- 
tional, free, and frets at restraint, and naturally 
employs an abundance of color. This Baroque 
movement arose in Southern Europe and, like 
the preceding one, swept over the continent and 
England. Impatience at the restrictions of the 
Renaissance doubtless aided the spreading of 
the Baroque influence. Rococo, Art Nouveau 
and the '*Newer Decoration" are all outbursts 
of the Romantic spirit. The Baroque retained 
the heaviness and impressiveness of the Re-- 
naissance. Its influence continued in France 
until the time of Louis XIV, when classicism 
was again introduced into furniture design, al- 
though in a manner called pompous. 

There are many minor periods of influence 
on furniture design which would need much 
explanation and illustration, hence only the 
broad and general history of design has been 
touched upon.— Goorf Furniture Magazine. . 



^^^^ ^ 




French Doors M-400 

Tl^HILE French Doors are intended primarily for outside use— for porches, 
^ ' sun rooms, etc.— this illustration shows that they are now employed to 
good advantage for inter-rcom use where lighting or heating is a reason for 
separating two rcoms. 



Illustration shows White Enamel finish, glazed Plain Double Strength 
Glass. 

Layout-— Stiles and Top Rail S^^'^ face, 33^'' over-all; Bottom Rail 
8%'' face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes, glazed as shown or 
Genume Polished Plate— Plain or Beveled. 



Plain Red Oak 



Each 
Each 
Each 
Each 
Each 
Each 
Each 



Door 
Door 
Door 
Door 
Door 
Door 
Door 



2-0x6-8 opening 
2-6x6-8 opening 
2-8x6-8 opening 
2-0x7-0 opening 
2-6x7-0 opening 
2-8x7-0 opening 
3-0x7-0 opening 



in pairs 
in pairs 
in pairs 
in pairs 
in pairs 
in pairs 
in pairs 



4-0x6-8, IW 
5-0x6-8, IM" 
5-4x6-8, IM' 
4-0x7-0, l^A' 
5-0x7-0, IM' 
5-4x7-0, IH" 
6-0x7-0, IM" 



Birch 

Each Door 2-0x6-8 opening in pairs 4-0x6-8, 1^'' 
Each Door 2-6x6-8 opening in pairs 5-0x6-8, 1^" 
Each Door 2-8x6-8 opening in pairs 5-4x6-8, 1%'' 
Each Door 2-0x7-0 opening in pairs 4-0x7-0, 1 %" 
Each Door 2-6x7-0 opening in pairs 5-0x7-0 ,1^" 
Each Door 2-8x7-0 opening in pairs 5-4x7-0, 1%" 
Each Door 3-0x7-0 opening in pairs 6-0x7-0, m" 



For similar design for exterior, see M-685, page 248 

This Morgan Design can be built in ot her woods and sizes 



=^''' ^ 



Ill III 



1 ill III 



';^l^::::::~-.r-feai 



^M^M. 






French Doors M-401 



T F WE have given thought to the finishing and furnishing of our rooms, why 
-■' should we hide them from view, when French Doors can be used to such 
good advantage? 

Illustration shows Plain Red Oak finish, glazed Plain Double Strength 
Glass. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 514" face, 5y^/ over-all; Bottom Rail liyg" 
face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes, glazed as shown or 
Genuine Polished Plate— Plain or Beveled. 



Plain Red Oak 

Each Door 2-6x6-8 opening in pairs 5-0x6-8, l'j4" 
Each Door 2-8x6-8 opening in pairs 5-4x6-8, IM'^ 
Each Door 2-6x7-0 opening in pairs 5-0x7-0, 1 ^" 
Each Door 2-8x7-0 opening in pairs 5-4x7-0, 1%" 
Each Door 3-0x7-0 opening in pairs 6-0x7-0, 1 -^i" 



Birch 

Each Door 2-6x6-8 opening in pairs 5-0x6-8, 1 J^" 
Each Door 2-8x6-8 opening in pairs 5-4x6-8, 1 ^" 
Each Door 2-6x7-0 opening in pairs 5-0x7-0, 1 %" 
Each Door 2-8x7-0 opening in pairs 5-4x7-0, 1^" 
Each Door 3-0x7-0 opening in pairs 6-0x7-0, 1%" 



For corresponding design for exterior see M-729, page 265 

This Morgan Design can be built in other woods and sizes 



"^^^^^ 




French Doors M-402 



TTERE again artistic Morgan French Doors have been put to inter-room 
^ ^ use. This is an attractive design that would enhance the appearance of 
any home interior. 

Illustration shows Unselected Birch finished Mahogany, glazed Plain • - 

Double Strength Glass. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 53^'' face, 5y/ over-all; Bottom Rail 11^" - - ■ 
face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woock and sizes, glazed as shown or 
Genuine Polished Plate — Plain or Beveled. 



Plain Red Oak 

Each Door 2-6x6-8 opening in pairs 5-0x6-8, 1^" 
Each Door 2-8x6-8 opening in pairs 5-4x6-8, 1^" 
Each Door 2-6x7-0 opening in pairs 5-0x7-0, m" 
Each Door 2-8x7-0 opening in pairs 5-4x7-0, lf4" 
Each Door 3-0x7-0 opening in pairs 6-0x7-0, IM" 



Birch 



Each Door 2-6x6-8 opening in pairs 5-0x6-8, 
Each Door 2-8x6-8 opening in pairs 5-4x6-8, 
Each Door 2-6x7-0 opening in pairs 5-0x7-0, 
Each Door 2-8x7-0 opening in pairs 5-4x7-0, 
Each Door 3-0x7-0 opening in pairs 6-0x7-0, 






This Morgan Design can be built in other woods and sizes 



=^V. 157,,^ 




Accordion French Doors M-403 

ALL of the disadvantages of the large opening between rooms can be over- 
^^"^ come by the use of Accordion French Doors shown above. The rooms 
can be thrown together or separated at will. 

Illustration shows Plain Red Oak finish, glazed Plain Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 3}^" face, 33^" over-all; Bottom Rail 8^^" 
face, 9" over-all. 
Half Doors at sides made to order. 
For Center Doors, see page 262, Design M-725. 

This Morgan Design can be built in other woods and sizes 



158 



=S"°.K 



The Modern Kitchen 

1IVING in the new home in imagination — performing 
-/ in fancy the daily routine of duties— will suggest 
countless little conveniences and refinements for lessen- 
ing labor and eliminating monotony. 

Shut out drudgery before you build— in your plans. 
Make a business of housekeeping. Plan for system 
as thorough as that of office and workshop. 

Compare your kitchen with a desk or workbench— 
your closets with files or toolchest. 

In business everything is at hand, ready for instant 
use— no aimless running around. Is home less deserving 
than business? 

The well-planned built-in kitchen cabinet should 
not be overlooked. In many of the smaller homes it 
is cupboard and pantry combined. Properly placed in 
its relationship to sink and range it saves countless 
steps in the course of a day's work. Where servants 
are employed, constancy is assured. Various designs 
are pictured on the succeeding pages. 

Extra leisure is afforded by the sideboard built with 
an opening through to the kitchen. Instead of carrying 
the meals to the table through doors or pantry in the 
usual round-about way, they are passed directly through 
a sliding door in the sideboard. 

The ideal arrangement is to place a kitchen cabinet 
and sideboard, back to back, with wall opening between. 
This saves time by hours and steps by miles. 



^^^^'^^ 




Kitchen M-425 

AS WE write about this kitchen we see in it more than 
-^^ the several convenient cabinets, etc. We see a kitchen 
so complete and so handy that its owner will have many 
extra leisure hours to be spent in the enjoyment of things 
outside of her home duties. 

Over-all size of case at left of sink 3' 6" wide by 3' 0" 
high, r 6" deep. 

Over-all size of case at right of sink 3' 6" wide by 3' 10" . 
high, V 6" deep. 

Over-all size of large kitchen cupboard 4' 6" wide by 
7' 0" high, bottom section V 6" deep, top section 1' 0" deep. 

Height from floor to top of counter 2' 8". Space above 
counter 1' 0" high. 

Sash doors glazed with Plain Double Strength glass. 
Flour bin in lower section. 



y 



^^i!!^^ 




Kitchen M-426 

\T7E HEAR much about efficiency and system these days. 
V V How could the affairs of the kitchen be arranged more 
systematically than in this modern design? 

Sets between walls 9 ' 2" wide. Lower section 2 ' 8" high. 
2' 0" wide. 

Cupboards 2 ' 2" wide by 3 ' 10" high, 1' 0" deep. Doors 
glazed Double Strength. 
Open counter shelf 1 ' 0" high. 



161 



^JZ^ 



"I 



\ 




N 



Kitchen M-427 

O KITCHEN ever had too much cupboard room, but 
the woman who has a kitchen like this will have enough. 

Over-all size, 7' 6" wide by 8' 8" high. 

Lower section 1' 8'' deep with flour bin. Upper section 
r 2" deep. Open counter shelf 1' 2" high. Doors glazed 
Double Strength. 

Can be used in wall recess if desired. 



162 



^i2L^ 




Kitchen M-428 



/^OOKING and baking would cease to be drudgery in a 
^^ kitchen like this, with such splendid step-saving arrange- 
ment. 

..^3^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^' ^" ^i^^ by 7' 0" high. Lower section 
1 4 deep. Upper section 1' 0" deep. Height to top 
of counter 2' 8^ Open counter shelf 10" high. 

Left hand case 6' 0" wide by 2' 8" high, 1' 4" deep with 
flour bin. 




Kitchen Cabinet M-429 

Size over-all 5' 0" x 8' 6". Lower section T 4" deep. Upper section 
1' 0" deep. Height of counter 2' 8". Doors glazed Double Strength. 
Can be built in wall recess if desired. 




Kitchen Cabinet M-430 

Size over-all 4' 6" x 7' 0". 

Lower section 1' 4" deep. Upper section 11 M" deep. 
2' 8" to counter shelf. Open counter shelf l2" high. 
Doors glazed Double Strength. 

Can also be set in wall recess if desired. 



/ 



164 



^^JZ^ 




Kitchen Cabinet M-431 

odS shXil^^ Lu ""^l^'V^'^ ^f P- ^,f Sh^ '^ t^P of counter 2' 8" 
open siieU l^ high. Can also be set m wall recess if desired. 




Broom Case M-440 

Size over-all 2' 6" wide x 7' 6" high from floor to 
top of case, llj/^" deep, 10" deep inside. Made to 
set in corner of room. This case can be made to 
fit in wall recess if desired. 




Ironing Board Case M-445 

Inside measurement of case, 1' 5" wide x 6' 6" 
high, 3H" deep. Door r 53^" x 6' 8", l>i" thick 
Ironing board V 2" wide x 4' 8" long, 13-16" thick 



"\^ 165 .^^^ 



The Restful Bedroom 



pERHAPS the greatest mistake that may be 
made in the finishing and furnishing of the 
bedroom is to over-decorate and over-color it. The 
bedroom is intended to be a place where one can 
relax completely, and great care should be taken 
that no part or parts of it are too noticeable. The 
hangings, the walls, the rugs, the furniture, and 
the woodwork should all be in perfect harmony^ 
subdued and restful. We show a number of such 
designs on the following pages. You will find in 
them many interesting suggestions which will help 
you to keep your bedrooms well within the bounds 
of good taste and good sense. 

Wherever possible bedrooms should be located 
on the sunny side of the house and generous 
provisions made for natural light and good ven- 
tilation. The coloring of the bedroom should be 
carefully studied. 



166 



^^"°^^^ 




Bedroom M-450 

T^OTICE how unobtrusively and delicately these walls have been 
^^ paneled by a small, neat yet inexpensive Morgan moulding. 
We wish also to call your attention to the mirror door and to state 
again that every bedroom should have one. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



p2 



3^^V^ 



c=^ 



bJ 



Lh 



10 




10 


11 


12 


11 


[ 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



Page 

1 Ceiling Moulding M-8623 381 

2 Band Moulding M-8620 381 

3 Panel Moulding M-8168 381 

4 Window Apron. M-8641 383 

5 Window Stool M>8267 386 

6 Window Stop M-8541 379 

7 Base Moulding M-8042 375 



8 Base M-8705 

9 Base Shoe M-8422 

10 Back Band M-8378 

11 Casing M-8308 

12 Door Jamb, SJ^" wide.M-8424 

13 Door Stop M-8542 



13L 



The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-888, Mirror Door, 
shown on page 273. 



Page 
389 
397 
391 
391 
397 
379 



^167 ^ 




Bedroom M-451 

n^HIS is a quiet, restful room. There has been no attempt toward 
•*- elaboration or ornamentation. It fulfills all the requirements of 
a carefully planned sleeping room. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 

Page Page 

1 Ceiling Moulding M-8012 373 5 Door Jamb. 5W wide...M-8424 397 

2 Base M-8828 397 a nr^r.^ Qfnn \/f k^A9 "^IQ 

3 Back Band M>8387 390 ^ Door Stop M.8542 379 

4 Casing M-8358 390 7 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-700, 
shown on page_252. 



4 

-J-, 



^dJ 



168 



=^'^^ 




Bedroom M-452 



TX^E SEE in this illustration a well-planned and well-arranged 
^ ' bedroom. Notice that no rugs extend under the dainty twin 
beds. This is sensible. It makes it easier to move the beds about 
for making, or for cleaning the floor. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



C^ 



LJ^8 






9 

10 10 

11 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Window Apron M-8641 

2 Cove Moulding M-8059 

3 Window Stool M-8267 

4 Picture Moulding M-8263 

5 Window Stop M-8541 

6 Base Moulding M-8535 



Page 
383 

376 
386 
383 
379 
375 



7 Base M-8705 389 

8 Base Shoe M-8422 397 

9 Back Band. M-8378 391 

10 Casing M-8359 390 

11 Door Jamb, 53^" wide.M-8424 397 

12 Door Stop M-8542 379 



J|2 



The Door in illustration is Morgan Colonial design M-712, 
shown on page 260. 



=^''' ^ 




Bedroom M-453 

ALTHOUGH this is a luxurious chamber you will observe that no 
^ detail is glaring. All is subdued and quiet— from the simple, 
delicate moulding which forms the wall paneling to the 'dainty hang- 
ings which grace the cheerful French Doors. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last colunnn. 



1 Panel Moulding M-8168 

2 Back Band M-8378 

3 Casing M-8309 

4 Base Moulding .M-8740 



381 
391 
391 
396 



Page 

5 Base M-8741 396 

6 Base Shoe M-8422 396 

7 Threshold M-8278 387 



t" 



■Q, 



The Door illustrated is special. Any of Morgan Standardized French 
Doors could be substituted. 



LD6 



/ 



^^illi^ 




Bedroom M-454 



"V^OU cannot make a mistake by doing the entire walls, ceiling 
^ and woodwork of your bedroom in white enamel, as in the room 
shown above. Here again a Morgan moulding forms the paneling 
of the walls. 

Woodwork Parts Detailed Below 

For Individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



V 

9 


4 .XX.5 
10 


9 


^—^11 


L^ 



1 Cornice Cap M- 454 

2 Cornice Facia M-8394 

3 Band Moulding M-454 

4 Small Panel Moulding . M-8075 

5 Large Panel Moulding. M-8140 

6 Base M>8426 



Page 
171 
384 
171 
376 
380 
397 



7 Base Shoe M-8422 

8 Back Band M-454 

9 Casing M-8712 

10 Door Jamb, 53^" wide.M-8424 

11 Door Stop M-8095 



The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-727, 
shown on page 264. 



Page 

397 
171 
390 
397 
379 



171 



^"^ ^ 




Bedroom M-455 

n^HE wall effect shown here is in good taste only when the room 
■^ is fairly large and when it has a high ceiling; otherwise, it is apt 
to make the room appear smaller. 

Wookwork Parts Detailed Eelow 



For individual illustration of parts see pages 
indicated in last column. 



1 Ceiling Moulding M-8031 

2 Window Stop M-8541 

3 Window Stool M-8267 

4 Cove Moulding M-8060 

5 Window Apron M-8641 

6 Picture Moulding M-8263 



Page 

375 

379 
386 
376 
383 
383 



7 Base M-8426 

8 Base Shoe M-8422 

9 Sub-casing M- 455 

10 Casing M-455 

11 Door Jamb, 53^" wide.M-8424 

12 Door Stop M-8542 



The Door in illustration is Morgan design M-705, 
shown on page 256, 



Page 

397 
397 
172 
172 
397 
379 



(P' ^D ' 




=^ '" ^ 



The Sanitary Bathroom 

gEFORE planning the bathroom for the home 
of your dreams, it would be well to refer again 
to that subject in the article "A Woman's Thoughts 
About a Home." It contains much valuable advice 
for making and keeping the bathroom sanitary. In 
addition to the usual considerations of the immacu- 
late finishing of walls and woodwork, and proper 
lighting and ventilating facilities, ample drawer 
room for bathroom linen and a linen chute should 
be included. Also, many find the bathroom to be 
a practical place for a mirror door. After studying 
the suggestions on the pages which immediately 
follow, be sure to read carefully the valuable article 
on pages 182, 183 and 184. 



173 



=^^^-^ A^ 





Bathroom M-475 

TJERE is a bathroom that will save time and we venture 
J- -I it will save tempers, too. When the fresh towel or 
wash cloth is needed, it will be found neatly folded away in 
one of the handy cabinets. And the bottom compartment 
of the medicine cabinet may be reserved exclusively for **his'* 
shaving utensils. 

Size over-all of cases at right and left of lavatory is 
r 6" wide, 3' 10" high, 8'^ deep. Can be set in wall 
recess if desired. 

Size over-all of medicine cabinet is V 10" wide, 2' 10" 
high, inside depth 33^". Rough opening in wall 1' 8" 
X 2' 4". Size of mirror 14"xl8". 



^^^^^ 




Bathroom M-476 



'T^HE bathroom shown above, with its large mirror and 
-*- handy dressing cabinet, will appeal especially to **Milady/' 
Note how the tub is built into a recess. This is a practical 
arrangement. 

Size over-all of dressing table is 5' 0" wide, 2' 6" high, 

r 4" deep, opening under table 1' 8" wide. 
Size of mirror above dressing table is 32" wide x 40" high. ' 
Size over-all of medicine case is 2' 1" wide, 2' 8" high, 

inside depth 33^". Rough opening in wall 1' 8" x 2' 3" 

X 4?^^ Size of mirror 14"x20". 



I 



175 



^""^ 





fi^; 





i 



Bathroom M-477 

n^HIS shows another Morgan Standardized 
^ the bathroom. Note also the mirror door, 
room should have one. 



Cabinet for 
Every bath- 



Case made in two sections. Size over-all of linen case 
at bottom is 1' 10'^ wide, 3' 6" high, 10" deep. 

Size over-all of medicine case at top is V 10" wide, 3' 2" 
high, inside depth 3}4"- Rough opening for medicine case 
r 8" wide X 2' IV high x 4?^" deeo. Size of mirror 
14"x28". 



176 



^=^ ^" ^ 



% 




Bathroom M-478 



I 



T^O BATHROOM is complete without a linen case or 
^ ^ closet of some sort. The one shown above is unusually 
roomy. 

Size over-all of linen case set in corner is 2' 6" wide, 
8' 2" high, 10" deep. Can also be set in wall recess if 
desired. 

Size over-all of medicine case is 2' 0" wide, 3' 0" high, 
iI)^V^J? ^^P^^ ^^"- I^ough opening in wall 1' 10" wide, 
2 10" high, 4^" deep. Size of mirror 14"x20". Size 
of clothes chute door 12^ wide x 14" high. 



''^^^^^^ ^ 



"^ 



^^^^^Pl 



^ ii4^M!e:-4i 




Bathroom M-479 

IN ADDITION to the Morgan mirror and cases we show 
here a Morgan clothes chute, through which soiled Unen 
is dropped to the laundry below. 

Size over-all of linen cases at right and left of lavatory 
is V S" wide. 3' 6" high, 10" deep. 

Size of mirror above lavatory 60"xl2". Size of clothes 
chute door V 2" wide x V 6" high. Size of seat T 6" 
wide, r 0" deep, 1' 6" high. 



^^^7«^ 




Medicine Cabinet M-490 

^ Size over-all of medicine cabinet is 2' 0" wide, 2' 6" hitrh 
inside depth 3J^", ^ ' 

Size of rough opening 1' 10" wide, 2' 4" high. 4 3^" deeo 
Size of mirror 14"xl4". ^ ^^ '*/8 ueep. 




Medicine Cabinet M-491 

Size over-all of medicine cabinet is 2' 0" wide 2' 10" 
high, inside depth 3)i". 

Size of rough opening 1' 10" wide, 2' 4" high, W^' deeo 
Size of mirror 14"x20". ^ ^* 

Size of shelf under case 2' 0" long, 334" wide brackets 
33^"x4"xM" thick. ^ ' oracKets 



^^^^ ^ 




Medicine Cabinet M-492 

Size over-all of Medicine Cabinet is 2' 0" wide, 2' 10" 
high, inside depth 3M". 

Size of rough opening 1' 10" wide, 2' 6" high, 4%" deep. 
Size of mirror 12"xl8". 




Medicine Cabinet M-493 

Size over-all of Medicine Case is 2' 0" wide, 2' 8" high, 
inside depth 3M". 

Size of rough opening V 10" wide, 2' 2" high, 4%" deep. 
Size of mirror 14"xl8". 



^s. 



180 




Medicine Cabinet M-494 

Size over-all of Medicine Cabinet is 1' 10" wide, 2' 5" 
high, inside depth 334". 

Size of rough opening 1' 6" wide, 2' 1" high, 4 3^" deep. 
Size of mirror 12"xl8". 




Clothes Chute Door M-497 

Size of Clothes Chute Doors is optional. 

We suggest making them not less than 12" wide. 



^^"^ ^ 



The Comfortable, Sanitary Bathroom 

Written for '^Building With Assurance" 

By The Standard Sanitary Manufacturing Company 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



T^HE Bathroom of the Modern Home rep- 
A resents durabihty, attractiveness and econ- 
omy—economy in price and economy in the 
time required to keep it in immaculate con- 
dition. 

Money cannot be invested to better ad- 
vantage than in a sure source of health and 
convenience to the entire household. The 
bathroom equipment should be given the 
same careful thought and attention as anv 
other home furnishing, and it is well to visit 
showrooms maintained by manufacturers in 
all of the larger cities, or write to them for 
information and literature that you may be 
guided in a judicious selection of fixtures. 

No other part of the house possesses the 
charm peculiar to the ideally equipped bath- 
room. The progress in the manufacture of 
modern sanitary plumbing fixtures—the im- 
provements in design— and the beauty of the 
ware, with its lustrous surface in combination 
with the tile floor and walls, makes the room 
of Home Health and Comfort one of the most 
attractive rooms in the house. 

Built-in Bath 

The bathroom with built-in recess bath 
represents the highest sanitary efficiency. A 
few years ago when the enameled all over 
built-in bath was new, it was looked upon 
as more or less of a novelty, but 
it has so well established itself, 
that it is now a part of every 
bathroom of the thoroughly 
modern type. 

The built-in bath tubs are 
five inches lower than the old 
pattern tubs on feet, conse- ^ 
quently much easier to get into 
a.nd out of. If the bathroom is to be 
tiled, there is a considerable saving made in 
tile and labor, as the new style tub is built into 
the wall and floor, making it an integral part 
of the house. A built-in tub eliminates the 
accumulation of water and dirt under the back 
of the tub, which is so difficult to keep clean 
where the old pattern tub on feet is installed. 



The additional cost of the built-in bath tub is 
more than offset by attractive and cleanly 
appearance, and by the assurance of long 
years of service. 

The built-in bath is made in several designs 
and sizes and is furnished to be built into a 
recess or at right or left hand corner. Wher- 
ever possible, the bathroom should be arranged 
so that the supply and waste fittings for the 
tub can be concealed in the side of the partition. 

Shower Bath 

The exhilarating pleasure and convenience 
derived from a shower bath has made it a 
necessary part of the equipment of a complete 
bathroom. Shower bath units are constructed 
in a great variety of designs and sizes. The 
mixing valve, controlling the temperature of 
the water with a lever, enables the user im- 
mediately to obtain any temperature desired. 

In many homes where it was once considered 
sufficient to have only a bath tub, shower 
baths are now being installed with the bath tub. 
The shower head is adjustable, so that the 
spray of water is directed as desired, and can 
be prevented from wetting the hair. The 
built-in shower has a shampoo, so that women 
need no longer consider washing their hair an 
ordeal, when this fixture can be so readily and 




182 



^ ^"^^ 



inexpensively installed over the side of a built- 
in bath tub. 

The ordinary house range boiler will supply 
only a limited' amount of hot water, and its 
temperature soon declines to a minimum. 
For this reason, and for the best service, an 
instantaneous gas heater is recommended with 
as direct a connection to the shower as possible. 
In this way, a sufficient quantity of hot water 
is ^supplied and it has the added advantage of 
being constant and even in temperature. 

Lavatories 

The manufacturers are producing a wide 
variety of dCvSigns and sizes of lavatories, or 
washstands, to suit every individual taste and 
requirement. The pedestal lavatories of enam- 
eled iron or vitreous china are considerably 
in demand for the better class of residence 
work, and this type, with plain straight lines 
and simple design, is most popular. A feature 
being adopted quite generally is the Combina- 
tion Water Supply fitting, which consists of 
two china handle controls for the hot and cold 
water, supplying the mixed tempered water 
through one spout, permitting the user to 
wash in running water. Recently the manu- 
facturers have made this spout an integral 
part of the top slab of the washstand, elimi- 
nating practically all exposed nickel work. 
In selecting the lavatory, the type and design 
of the bath tub should be considered, so that 
the fixtures will harmonize properly. The 
size of the bathroom itself is quite a factor in 
the selection of fixtures 
of the proper size. 





Where lack of space will not permit the use of 
a pedestal lavatory, lavatories of the wall hang- 
ing type, with integral back, can be procured. 

The Toilet 

Of all the plumbing fixtures, there is none 
which should be more carefully selected than 
the toilet, one reason being that its principal 
operating mechanism is permanently immersed 
in water and should therefore be of the very 
best quality heavy brass, successfully to with- 
stand the corrosive action of the water in 
many localities. Another reason is the impor- 
tant sanitary function the toilet must perform. 
The tank and bowl 
should be constructed 
of hard-fired vitreous 
china, and substantial in 
design. The extended 
front lip with open 
extended front seat is 
now being recognized 
for its many sanitary 
advantages and is being 
adopted quite generally. 
Closet seats are now 
being furnished with a 
guaranteed white finish, 
which will not discolor 
or chip. 

The average purchaser is expected to know 
or understand little of the operation or mech- 
anism of water closets and unwittingly errs 
in the selection of a toilet more often than in 
that of any other plumbing fixture. The 
error is discovered only after the installation 
of a toilet which proves entirely unsatisfac- 
tory and continues to be a source of trouble 
and expense. 

Accessories 

A medicine cabinet or wall mirror adds to 
the attractiveness and convenience of the 
bathroom. Glass shelves, towel bars, 
tumbler holders, soap holders, etc., are now 
made of vitreous china and white finished cast 
brass and iron, and the arrangement of these 
trimmings over the various fixtures should be 
made with a view of harmonizing with the 
general appearance of each fixture. If you 
have tile walls in your bathroom, it is possible 
to get towel bars and soap dishes which fit 
directly into the wall. 

Kitchen Sink 

The sink now in universal demand is a 
* 'one-piece" sink; the basin, drainboard and 



183 



^''' ^- 



back are made in one piece. The 
old style sinks, with loose back and 
drainboards (generally of wood), 
with consequent crevices and joints, 
were unsanitary and difficult to 
keep clean. The *'one-piece'' sink 
overcomes these objections and 
safeguards the health of your fam- 
ily, when the food is prepared. IT 
CAN BE ADJUSTED TO ANY 
DESIRED HEIGHT. The ordi- 
nary kitchen sink is set too low. 
integral drainboards can be furnished on right 
or left side, or on both sides. A rubber mat can 
be placed on the drainboard, minimizing the 
breakage of dishes. A supply fitting for kitch- 
en sinks is now being furnished, by which the 
hot and cold mixed water is drawn through 
one spout, of the swing type, which can be 



# 4| 



The 





swung to the side and out of the way, while 
working in the sink. 

Culinary Table 

A snow white durable table without legs. 
This table is not a plumbing fixture, but a 
piece of kitchen furniture. It is made of 
porcelain enameled iron (the same material 
used in the kitchen sinks and built-in bath- 
tubs), made all in one piece without a crack 
or crevice. One side is made perfectly level^ — 
the other side has a slight depression, so that 
this part makes an ideal mixing place. The 
table is fastened to the wall by strong invisible 
hangers, by means of which the table can be 
set at any desired height. 

Laundry Trays 

The proper plumbing equipment for the 
basement or laundry room consists of a battery 



of trays^two, preferably three tubs— made of 
white enameled iron or vitreous china, with 
wringer bases. Trays made of this material 
retain their color and finish and are the most 
sanitary. Cheaper trays of composition ma- 
terial (stone, slate, etc.) do not 
present as attractive an appear- 
ance, nor do they combine the 
same sanitary and durable quali- 
ties. As these fixtures are used 
daily for years, a quality fixture 
should be selected. 

CARE OF PLUMBING FIX- 
^ TURES will repay you many 
times in lengthened service. Vit- 
reous china and porcelain enam- 
eled fixtures have a beautiful white glossy 
surface, free from stains and blemishes, and 
are easily kept immaculately white and clean. 
Simple precautions, however, must be exer- 
cised not to destroy this surface by the use of 
gritty powders, etc. With ordinary care, it 
will last a lifetime. 

Installation 

Plumbing fixtures should always be in- 
stalled by a competent plumber. It is often 
dangerous to the health of your family to 
have unqualified persons do the necessary 
roughing in and connecting of the fixtures. 
Complete specifications and description of 
the work and the fixtures should be included 
in your plumbing contract. 

Any manufacturer of plumbing fixtures will 
gladly prepare, without cost, complete speci- 
fications of fixtures for you, including pictures 
of the fixtures suggested. In this way, you will 
obtain the benefit of their knowledge and ex- 
perience, which in the past has solved many 
problems difficult for persons less familiar 
with plumbing. 



=^^^^- 



Fireplaces, Bookcases, Window 

Seats, Cozy Corners and 

Radiator Covers 



J\JATURALLY it is the smaller items, such as 
Fireplaces, Bookcases, Window Seats, Cozy 
Corners, Radiator Covers, etc., which complete the 
coziness and comfort of our home. In fact, the 
fireplace and mantel can be made a very interest- 
ing feature in the home. Likewise, the built-in 
bookcase is a worthy and useful addition to the 
plan. Then, too, comfortably upholstered window 
seats and attractive cozy corners can be very 
effectively placed in the more barren spots. The 
uncovered Radiator always mars the appearance 
of a room. The artistic Radiator Cover overcomes 
this disagreeable item. 

We have designed all of liiese articles with 
great care and we show a fine line on the suc- 
ceeding pages. They contain many suggestions 
for making your home cozier and more attractive 
at only a slight additional expenditure. 



==^'^^^ 




Fireplace M-500 



A FIREPLACE nook like this fairly radiates comfort. 
-^^ We can easily imagine it one of the popular and most 
used spots in the home^ — ^especially on wintry nights when the 
crackle and glow of a log fire would make one content to 
stay inside. If you will turn to the home plans in the front 
of this book, you will find a number which provide space 
where such a nook would be very effective. 



"^^«^^ 




Fireplace and Bookcase M-501 

nPHIS design will appeal to those who like to have their 
^ favorite books close at hand. Notice especially the 
unusual amount of book room and the drawers which are 
provided under each section of shelves. The casement win- 
dows above swing in— permitting ample light and ventilation. 



^^ 157 ^ 




Fireplace, Bookcase and Seats M-502 



TX7E THINK this is one of the most attractive fireplace 
▼ » and seat designs we have. Particularly note the 
artistic paneling throughout this design. By this arrange- 
ment the fireplace is made to harmonize with the rest of the 
room. This design contains another good suggestion also — 
that is, making use of the space under seats for books, maga- 
zines, etc. 



^^»" ^ 




^BSgR 



mm 






Fireplace and Bookcase M-503 



T^HIS illustration shows more clearly than some the im- 
-^ portance of woodwork in a room. The whole beauty of 
this room can be credited to the woodwork. The artistic 
paneling above the mantel, with its neat candelabra, makes 
a wonderful background for the favorite painting. The 
ceiling beams, the casement windows, the bookcases, the 
mantel shelf and the seat, all harmonize and combine to make 
this an unusually attractive, as well as a practical and useful 
design. 



189 



^^iZ^ 




Fireplace and Bookcase M-509 

'T^HIS is not a large or an expensive design. But it would 
■^ be hard to find a more artistic or useful one. Perhaps 
this is exactly the fireplace which would harmonize with 
your home. 




Fireplace M-512 

n^HIS neat Colonial pattern— plain but 
^ artistic — is especially appropriate for a 
Colonial bedroom. 



=^V1^ A^ 




M-517 




M-518 



M-519 




M-520 




3BBggSWSgil W l ft M H l l | M '*'^ 



M-521 



Mantel Shelves 

TTERE are several additional mantel shelves of very latest designs which we 
^ ^ can furnish in any wood and which can be finished to match any woodwork. 



-^'^'^ 




Bookcase M-525 



TTERE is an attractive Morgan Standardized design that 
^ ^ will appeal to those who possess a large library or 
who realize the necessity of ample book room. Every home 
should have a desk of some sort. The desk section shown 
here provides a good place for keeping papers and corre- 
spondence. 

Notice also how the case beneath the window seat has 
been made to match the bookcase. 



^^192 .^^ 




Bookcase M-526 

TDOOKCASES to match the woodwork of the room are 
-L' becoming more and more popular. This one can be 
furnished in any size and in any wood. 




Bookcase M-527 

TTERE is another Morgan Standardized Bookcase, which 
^ ^ can be suppUed in any size and to match any interior 



trim. 



193 



^ 




Seat M-535 

n^HIS seat and fireplace is designed especially for rooms 
^ of Craftsman or Mission styles. 




W^indow Seat M-536 

TTERE we see that an offset or jog in the wall can be trans- 
^ -*" formed into an attractive and useful nook by the use 
of a seat like this. 



^^I!L^ 




Cozy Corner Seat M-537 

OO OFTEN there is a rather barren looking corner which 
^ can be made a cozy one by instalUng a comfortable, invit- 
ing seat, like the one shown above. 







Cozy Corner Seat M-538 

l^OTICE the three drawers under the seat and the useful 
^ ^ corner compartment in this artistic design. 



195 



^^ 




Window Seat M-539 

CTIVE windc 
match the wall paneling. 



AN ATTRACTIVE window seat and three drawers to 




Radiator Cover M-543 

T^HIS shows how a radiator may be made a 
■^ thing of beauty by the use of a Morgan 
radiator cover. 



"V. ^^^A^ 




Radiator Cover M-544 
:ITIST] 

high type. 



AN ARTISTIC cover for a radiator of the 




W 



Radiator Cover M-545 

HO would guess that this beautiful '* chest' 
is really a radiator cover? 



197 



=v- "'^ 



A 




Radiator Cover M-546 

ANOTHER Morgan Standardized design that 
^ can be furnished in any wood and size. 




Radiator Cover M-547 

WHY mar your room by the presence of an 
imsightly radiator when these covers are 
so easily available? 



198 



^ 



Development of Home Heating 

Prepared Especially for ^'Building With Assurance" 
By Crane Company, Chicago 



MAN made his first efforts to improve the 
comforts of heating the home when he 
put in a chimney to draw off the smoke which 
previously was allowed to spread through the 
home. 

One of the first types of heating stoves was 
made by Benjamin Franklin in 1744. This 
stove, constructed after the design of the fire- 
place, was made of iron and stood out from 
the wall. Wood was the fuel used. 

This stove by its arrangement gave direct 
heat from the flame through the iron of the 
frame. The next improvement was the in- 
stallation of a front incasing the fire, so that 
the room was heated entirely through the iron 
walls of the stove. This change gave us the 
modern stove which has been developed in 
innumerable ways until at present we have 
the modern heating and cooking ranges. Man 




The Franklin Stove 




Sectional View of the Franklin Stove 



next sought to improve the ventilation of his 
home and decided to put the stove in the 
basement, circulating the air from the outside 
through what we call a furnace. The air cir- 
culating around this confined stove rose through 
ducts and registers to the floors above. You 
can readily see by the illustrations on page 200 
the improvements in seventy-two years. 

The average home builder has only a general 
knowledge of home heating. He should secure 
the advice of a competent architect and en- 
gineer, and should also carefully read the 
recommendations of the various manufacturers 
of heating equipment, to guide him in the 
selection of equipment best adaptable to his 
requirements. 

We will endeavor to acquaint the home 
builder with a few rules so that he may satisfy 
himself that he is obtaining the proper heating 
equipment. 

Furnace 

The selection of a furnace should be made 
with a view of having the air which is circu- 
lated to the rooms above come in contact 



^^^^^^^ 



with the greatest amount of heating surface 
of the furnace in its travel to the floors above. 
The furnace should have the least lodgment 
space on the inside for dirt and soot to collect. 
The conservation of coal in the present day- 
is important and it is advisable to have a 
furnace which takes its cold air from the first 
floor, with an auxiliary cold air pipe taken 
from the outside air. The area of the cold 
air duct from the first floor should be at least 
twenty per cent greater than the combined 
area of the supply ducts to the floor above. 
See to it that you have a chimney of ample 
size and height; also, that it is air-tight and 
free from air leakages and well above the roof. 
Keep out the infiltration of cold air through 
chimney and joints in furnace; also, see that 
furnace doors can be closed tight. The infil- 
tration of air is the cause of fuel waste. A 
furnace should be easily accessible for cleaning. 

For furnace work estimate the heat losses 
through walls, windows, contents, etc., (see 
tables for constants) on the B. T. U. basis 
and provide the size of ducts based on the 
following per square inch of duct area. 

For 1st floor rooms divide the total B. T. U. by 120. 
For 2nd floor rooms divide the total B. T. U. by 150. 
For 3rd floor rooms divide the total B. T. U. by 180. 



Steam Heating 

The first practicable application of steam 
for heating purposes was made by James Watt 



in the winter of 1784 and 1785. He used 
steam for warming his study. The earliest 
systems of steam heating were of the single 
pipe type, many of which are now in operation. 
The two pipe system with supply and return 
line obviated the necessity of returning the 
condensation through the same line. In the 
original systems the air in the radiators was 
relieved by a small hand operated valve, 
located part way up from the bottom of the 
radiator on the end section. These were very^ 
often neglected, causing the radiator to become 
air bound, thereby reducing its efficiency. 
These valves have gone through a long series 
of development until at present we have the 
automatic vent. There are quite a few different 
types of these valves on the market, more 
or less successful, but there is always a liabil- 
ity of some of these flooding the floors and 
ruining the finish of the rooms. On page 201 
are three illustrations showing the latest types 
of these air valves. 

There are many different types of heating 
systems on the market today with their various 
valves and apparatus. They are all intended 
to obtain the greatest efficiency of the radiating 
surface, by successfully removing the air and 
condensation from the radiator. 

The lack of thorough knowledge of the 
simple methods of removing air and water 
from the radiator has caused an erroneous 
impression by numerous home builders regard- 
ing the success and value of steam and hot 
water heating systems. A little investigation 





Carton Furnace of 1847 



Carton Furnace of 1920 



200 



^^ 




by the prospective owner will save him this 

trouble. 
Steam systems for house heating (see layout 
page 202) have in general a 
pressure range from zero pres- 
sure to five and ten pounds. 
The present heating boilers are 
built to carry fifteen pounds 
pressure. This, you see, will 
give a pressure working range 
from to 15 pounds, which 
gives a very responsive range to 
meet the changes in outdoor 
weather conditions. 

We are showing 
on page 204 cuts of 
single and double 
pipe connections to radiators. 

Hot Water Heating 

In 1777 Bonnemain invented a method or 
system of heating by means of hot water 
which was, perhaps, the beginning of the hot 
water heating era. There are records of a 
conservatory in Brompton, England, which 
was successfully heated by hot water in 1816. 
Hot water heating systems for residence work 
are of two types: the open system, with the 
expansion tank at the highest point, and the 
pressure system. In 1910 some engineers con- 
ceived the idea that water could be raised 
to higher temperature than 212° by confining 
the water in a closed system and raising the 
pressure, thereby raising the working tem- 
perature up to 220° without boiling. 

This gives the home owner a certain amount 
of satisfaction and insurance that he can meet 
the temperature of an unusually cold day. 
This system has a temperature range from 
100° to 220°, which gives a wide range of 
operation. See illustration on page 203. 

This system has a closed expansion tank in 
the basement, which is connected to a dia- 
phragm valve which controls 
the damper and check, and can 
be set to the proper notches 
on the damper chain to give 
the desired temperature of wa- 
ter to maintain the required 
temperature of the rooms 
above, depending upon the out- 
side weather conditions. 

With this system, you have 
considerably smaller 
sized radiator con- 
nections and feed 
mains than on the 





open tank system, thereby cutting down the 
cost and radiation losses in the larger mains 
in the basement. 

We have endeavored to give a brief general 
line of the three modern methods now in 
vogue so that the home builder can make his 
selection in accordance with his means, etc. 

Look well to the design of your chimney. 
Its area should be slightly greater than the 
area of the smoke pipe called for in the heater 
catalogues. See that it is of good, tight con- 
struction of the right size all the way to the 
top, and that it has no inside abrading sur- 
faces to cause undue friction of the gases in 
their passage to the top; also, that chimney 
extends well above the roof (see illustration, 
page 204). Provide a 
cleanout door for remov- 
ing soot at the base. 
The ideal arrangement 
is to have a sep- 
arate chimney 
for the heating 
system and not 
have any other 
openings into it, 
as the other open- 
ings tend to check the fur- 
nace or boiler draft. 

Estimating Radiation 

The home builder will find the following 
rule, which is universally used to estimate 
steam radiation, very helpful. This rule was 
first published by the late J. H. Mills in 1890 
in his work entitled **Heat." It is for low 
pressure steam heating and presumes that the 
radiation will be at a temperature of 220 
degrees and the rooms at 70 degrees. 

1 sq. ft. of radiation to 200 cu. ft. of air, 
1 sq. ft. of radiation to 20 sq. ft. of wall, 
1 sq. ft. of radiation to 2 sq. ft. of glass. 

When water heat is to be considered, figure 
on a basis of 170 degrees water and add 60 per 
cent to the amount figured by the above rule. 

The home builder should pay particular 
attention to windows and doors. If windows 
are loosely fitted or wide cracks appear around 
edges of doors, much cold air will be admitted 
and the problem of heating will be a difficult 
one. New buildings, as well as old, may be 
fitted with loosely constructed windows, and 
it is well to take all these things into con- 
sideration. Heat is lost through all material 
when the temperature on one side is lower 
than on the other side. 



^^"^^ 



The loss of heat in this manner is known 
as heat transmission. The following constants 
from reliable authorities indicate the heat loss 
through different materials per square foot 
of surface per hour per degree difference. The 
heat loss is expressed in B. T. U. or fractions 
thereof. 

Walls 

8" brick 45 

12" brick 33 

16*' brick 27 

20" brick 23 

8" reinforced concrete 55 

12" reinforced concrete 40 

12" sandstone 44 

18" sandstone 31 

8" cement or concrete 70 

Lath partition plastered both sides 35 

12" cement or concrete 50 

16" cement or concrete 41 

Corrugated iron 85 

Frame 

Ordinary overlapped clapboard 

7/16" thick .50 

Same with paper lining 38 

Same with W sheathing 35 

Same with M" sheathing and paper ... .32 
Poor loose construction 60 to .80 



Exposed Roofs 

Slate on 1" boards .50 

Composition 35 

Reinforced concrete 55 

Sheet iron 1 .30 

Corrugiated iron 1 . 50 

4" concrete, cinder fill 65 

Ceilings 

Fireproof, floor above .18 

Fireproof, no floor above 52 

Cement or tile, floor above 11 

Cement or tile, no floor above .42 

Lath and plaster, floor above 26 

Lath and plaster, no floor above 52 

Steel, floor above 35 

Opening in Walls 

Single windows 1 . 09 

Double windows 56 

Single windows, wire glass 1 . 35 

Single skylights 1.11 

Wood doors 45 

Floors 

Fireproof construction 12 

Cement 31 

%" wood, plaster below 21 

%" wood, no plaster below 42 

Wood joist, 1" flooring, air space and 
concrete under. 07 



RADIATORS OFTHE 
HOT WATER TYPE 
ARE GENERALLY 
USED 



STEAM RADIATORS 

MAY BE USED WITH 

r^ AT I Ti FACTO R Y R E3 U LT? 



Mod l-^JFPMAN 
VAL.VE 




HOFFMAN VAPOR SPECIALTIES 

THE NO. 8 HOFFMAN RETURN LINE VALVE 

THE NO. 10 HOFFMAN VAPOR VALVE 

THE HOFFMAN EQUALIZING LOOP 

THE HOFFMAN AIR SEPARATOR 

THEIR USE MAKES VAPOR HEATING SAFE, EFFICIENT AND E 



The picture above shows a typical layout of a system for a home. 



=^^°^^ 



B. T. U. Required for Heating Air 



ixternal 


Inside Temperature 


Temp. 


40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 


—40 


1.802 2.027 2.252 2.479 2.703 2.928 3.154 3.379 


—30 1.540 1.760 1.980 2.200 2.420 2.640 2.860 3.080 


—20 


1.290 1.505 1.720 1.935 2.150 2.365 2.580 2.795 


—10 


1.051 1.262 1.473 1.684 1.892 2.102 2.311 2.522 





.822 1.028 1.234 1.439 1.645 1.851 2.056 2.262 


10 


.604 .805 1.007 1.208 1.409 1.611 1.812 2.013 


20 


.393 .590 .787 .984 1.181 1.378 1.575 1.771 


30 


.192 .383 .578 .770 .963 1.155 1.345 1.540 


40 


188 .376 .564 .752 .940 1.128 1.316 


50 


.184 .365 .551 .735 .918 1.102 


60 


179 .359 .538 .718 .897 


70 


175 .350 .525 .700 



Approximate Radiator Co-efficients 

Single column 1 . 65 

Two column 1 . 55 

Three column 1 . 45 

Four column 1 . 35 

Window radiation 1 . 45 

Example showing the use of tables: It is 
desired to heat a room to 70 degrees temper- 
ature with outside temperature ten degrees 
below zero, steam at 220 degrees. For con- 
venience, we will assume that room has as 
follows: Building, frame construction; use 
two column radiators. 



1800 cu. ft. of space in it, 
200 sq. ft. of exposed wall, 
70 sq. ft. of exposed single glass, 
180 sq. ft. of ceiling (floor above). 

—10° to +700 = 80° difference. 

Temp, steam 220° —70° temp, room 

= 150° X 1.55 = 232 B. T. U. per sq. ft. of 

heating surface per hr. 

Referring to the constants for 80° temper- 
ature difference, we have the following losses 
through the various materials: 

1800 cu. ft. X 1.684 =3031 B. T. U. 

200 sq. ft. wall x (80° diff. x 35) =5600 B. T. U. 

70 sq. ft. glass x (80° x 1.09) =6104 B. T. U. 

180 sq. ft. ceiling x (80° x .26) =3744 B. T. U. 

18479 B. T. U. 
18479 -=- 232 = 79 sq. ft. of 2 column radiation. 

Ten per cent should be added for northern 
exposures and where the winds are to be 
counted on as an important factor. The above 
room would then have 86.9 sq. ft. of 2 column 
radiation or 87 sq. ft. 

Radiators 

Radiators should be located along the out- 
side walls, preferably under the windows, and 
should be of the single- or double-column type 




^^^^ ^ 



and of low height, as they are more efficient 
than the higher radiators. The single-column 
makes for a neater appearance and does not 
occupy as much room as the three and four 
column type. They are better heat emitters 
and you thereby require a slightly less amount 
of radiation to do the work. See that radiators 
are kept clean, provide yourself with a narrow 
bristle brush made especially for that purpose 
or preferably a vacuum cleaner. 

Boiler 

In estimating the size of the boiler required 
for the home, the square feet of surface on all 
mains and risers used on the job should be 
considered in connection with the radiators 
to be installed. This additional surface should 
be carefully figured out and considered with 
reference to the amount of steam it condenses, 
or its cooling effect on water. 

If radiation other than the direct form is 
used, the boiler capacity must be increased 
in proportion as those surfaces may condense 
steam or cool the water more rapidly than 
direct radiation. Boiler should have a deep 
firepot, with long travel of gases to the chimney. 
All joints and doors should be tight to prevent 
the infiltration of unnecessary air to the fire. 

Heating surface of boiler should be easily 
accessible for cleaning. These surfaces should 
be thoroughly cleaned quite often during the 
heating season. The general practice in the 
Chicago district is to have the boiler of a 
capacity equivalent to fifty per cent greater 
than the estimated amount of radiation to be 
installed. 

Coal Consumption 

It will be of interest to the home builder 
to estimate approximately what his coal con- 
sumption is to be. The chart on page 205 gives 
the average monthly outdoor temperatures 
compiled by the United States Government. 



DRAFT ^ 



M\ GiOOD 
DRAFT 





The chart below shows 
the coal consumption for 
radiation from 500 to 2000 
square feet. 

In different sections of 
the country the hours of 
operating system vary 
considerably. 

To find what this heat- 
ing demand is in percent, 
the average temperature 
for the season under con- 
sideration is subtracted 
from the indoor tempera- 
ture and the result is divi- 
ded by the maximum tem- 
perature difference used in proportioning the 
radiation. For example, in Chicago the aver- 
age is 35.7°; then 70° indoor minus 35.7° equals 
34.3°, and this divided by 80° (temperature 
difference figured minus 10° outside to 70° 
inside) gives an average of 42.9%, or 17 tons 
of hard and 16 tons of soft coal based on 5000 
hours per season for a steam plant with 500 
sq. ft. of radiation. Hot water heating requires 
about 25 percent less. 

Approximate Coal Consumption 
per Season 

Per cent of demand based on average tem- 
perature against the temperature difference 
between the outside and inside temperature. 





SQUARE FEET OF RADIATION 






Per Cent 














Hours 


De- 500 


1000 


1500 


2000 


operated mand Hard 


Soft 


Hard Soft 


Hard 


Soft 


Hard 


Soft 


5000 


75 30 


27 


60 58 


88 


85 


115 


110 




65 25 


25 


52 50 


81 


78 


102 


100 




55 23 


22 


45 43 


70 


65 


95 


87 




45 18 


17.5 


35 34 


55 


52 


90 


83 




35 14 


13 


27.5 26 


42 


40 


55 


52 




25 10 


9.5 


20 19 


30 


26 


40 


37.5 




20 8,5 


8 


16 15 


24 


23 


32.5 30 


4000 


75 28 


26 


47.5 45 


75 


70 


98 


90 




65 21 


20 


42 40 


65 


63 


87 


8t 




55 18 


17 


35 33 


54 


50 


72 


68 




45 15.5 


15 


28 25 


45 


42 


56 


55 




35 11 


11 


22.5 -21 


35 


33 


45 


42 




25 8.5 


8 


16 15 


25 


23 


33 


31 




20 7 


6.5 


12.5 12 


20 


19 


26 


25 


3000 


75 18 


17 


35 32.5 


53 


50 


75 


70 - 




65.17 


16 


30 30 


48 


46 


65 


60 




55 14 


13 


26 25 


40 


39 


54 


50 




45 11 


10.5 


22.5 21 


33 


31 


45 


43 




35 9 


8.5 


17 16 


26 


25 


34 


32 




25 6.5 


6 


12 11 


18 


17 


24 


23 




20 5 


4.75 


9.5 9 


15 


14 


19.£ 


> 18,5 


1500 


75 9.25 9 


18 17 


27 


26 


35 


33 




65 8.25 8 


16 15 


24 


23 


32 


30 




55 7 


6.5 


13.5 13 


20 


19 


26 


25 



45 5.75 5.25 11 10, 

35 4.5 4.25 9 8. 

25 3.25 3 6.5 6 

20 2.75 2.5 5 4. 



5 16.5 15.5 22.5 21 

5 13 12 17 16 

9.5 9 12 11.25 

75 7.75 7,25 10 9.75 



-v.^Q^.v^^ 




Steam Valve 



Average Monthly Outdoor Temperatures 
for 33 Year Period 



Locality 

Albany, N. Y. . . . 

Amarillo, Tex . . . 

Atlanta, Ga 

Bismark, N. Dak. 

Boise, Idaho 

Boston, Mass.. . . 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio. . 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Green Bay, Wis. . 
Harrisburg, Pa... 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Knoxville, Tenn . . 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Louisville, Ky . . . 
New Orleans, La, 
New York, N.Y. 

Oswego, N. Y 

Port Huron, Mich 
Portland, Ore.... 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Washington, D. C. . . 



Lowest 
Observed 

-24 
-16 



-44 
-28 
-13 
-23 
-17 
-30 
-36 
-14 
-25 
-22 
-16 
-12 
-20 
7 

- 6 
-23 
-25 

- 2 
-41 
-20 
-15 



MONTHLY Average 

TEMPERATURES of Sea- 
Oct, Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. son 

50 38 28 22 24 32 46 34.3 

56 44 36 34 37 45 55 43.9 

62 52 45 42 45 52 61 51.3 
44 26 15 7 8 22 43 23.6 

50 40 32 29 34 42 50 39.6 

52 41 32 27 28 35 45 37.1 

53 39 29 24 25 34 46 35.7 

53 40 31 26 27 34 46 36.7 

52 37 26 20 24 36 51 35.1 

47 32 21 15 17 27 41 28.6 

54 42 33 29 30 38 51 39.6 

55 42 33 28 31 40 52 40.1 

56 42 32 26 30 41 54 40.1 
58 47 40 38 41 48 57 47.0 

63 52 44 41 44 53 63 51.4 
58 46 38 34 37 45 56 44.8 
70 61 54 53 56 62 68 60.5 

56 44 34 30 31 38 48 40.1 

51 39 29 24 24 31 43 34.4 
50 37 27 22 22 30 42 32.9 

53 46 41 39 41 46 51 45.3 

48 31 19 12 15 28 46 28,4 

52 40 32 29 33 41 50 39.6 

57 45 36 33 34 42 53 42.9 





Hot Water Fitting 

Valves 

The home builder should look well to the 
selection of valves for his heating system: A 
leaky valve is a source of a great deal of 
annoyance caused by the escape of steam and 
water, soiling the trimmings of the valves, 
also the rugs, walls and ceilings, and necessi- 
tating the annoyance of repairs during the 
winter. 

These valves should be of the self packing 
type. A small compression spring under the 
stuffing nut keeps the packing in position and 
fully compensates for the wear on packing. 
(See the section below). 

In hot water heating jobs the valves should 
have a brass plate with an arrow fitted at the 
top of the handwheel, which indicates whether 
the valve is open or closed. This type valve 
opens or closes in a quarter of a turn. Discs 
of hot water valves should always have a 
small 3/^" diameter hole through them to allow 
water to flow through the radiator to prevent 
the possibility of freezing. 



Hot Water Valve 




Section of Valve 



205 



^ 



Lumber and Its Uses 



AS ALL millwork is made from lumber, it might be well to give a brief description 
^^^ and comparison of the different woods most commonly used. 

Woods are divided into two general classes: Softwood, which withstands the ef- 
fects of weather and is adaptable to paint finish, is used to best advantage for the 
exterior of buildings, sash and doors, boxes and crates, toys and other minor articles; 
Hardwood, which takes varnish and stains of all kinds and as the term implies is 
hard of texture, is used for interior trimming of buildings, such as doors, stairwork, 
paneling, etc. ; flooring, furniture, car construction, automobiles, agricultural imple- 
ments and numerous other items. 

The most common softwoods are cedar, cypress, fir, poplar, redwood, yellow pine, 
spruce, hemlock, tamarack, larch, white pine and western pine. 

Hardwoods include butternut, buckeye, basswood, calico ash, brown ash, cherry, 
ehn, beech, hickory, maple, locust, unselected birch, red birch, curly birch, unselected 
gimi, red gum, quartered and figured red gum, plain red oak, plain white oak, quar- 
tered red oak, quartered white oak, sycamore, plain mahogany, figured mahogany, 
chestnut, walnut, and Circassian walnut. Of the hardwoods oak of all kinds, birch 
both unselected and red, gum of all kinds, mahogany and walnut are the most pop- 
ular for interior trimming and doors. Oak, maple and beech are the woods generally 
used for flooring. For furniture manufacture oak, gum, birch, mahogany and walnut 
are used more than the other woods, although there are many beautiful pieces of 
furniture made from ash, cherry and butternut. 

Below we are giving a table showing the annual wood consumption for various 
special purposes in the United States. 



1 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 



Million 
Purpose Board Feet 

General Building and Construction 19,000 

Planing Mill Products 15,000 

Boxes and Crates 4,600 

Furniture and Fixtures 1,400 

Car Construction 1,260 

Vehicles 740 

Woodenware, Novelties, etc.... 400 

Agricultural Implements 320 

Handles 280 

Musical Instruments 260 

Tanks and Silos 225 

Ship and Boat Building 200 

Caskets and Coffins 150 

Refrigerators and Kitchen Cabinets 140 

Excelsior 100 



Matches and Toothpicks.. 

Laundry Appliances 

Shade and Map Rollers 

Paving Materials and Conduits.. 

Trunks and Valises 

Machine Construction 

Boot and Shoe Findings 

Picture Frames and Moldings.... 

Shuttles, Spools and Bobbins 

Tobacco Boxes 

Sewing Machines 

Pumps and Wood Pipe 



85 
80 
79 
76 
75 
69 
66 
65 
65 
63 
60 
56 



28 


Purpose 

Automobiles 


Million 
Board Feet 

37 


29 


Pulleys and Conveyors 


36 


30 


Professional and Scientific Instruments. 
Toys 


35 


31 


29 


32 


Sporting and Athletic Goods 


25 


33 


Patterns and Flasks 


.. . 24 


34 


Bungs and Faucets 


21 


35 
36 


Plumbers' Woodwork 

Electrical Machinery and Apparatus 


20 

18 


37 


Brushes 


13 


38 


Dowels : 


12 


39 


Elevators 


10 


40 


Saddles and Harness 


9 


41 


Playground Equipment 


9 


42 


Insular Pins and Brackets 


.. .. 9 


43 


Butcher Blocks and Skewers 


8 


44 


Clocks 


8 


45 
46 


Signs and Supplies 

Printing Materials 


7 

. .. 5 


47 


Weighing Apparatus 


5 


48 


Whips, Canes, and Umbrella Sticks 


5 


49 


Brooms and Carpet-Sweepers 


2 


50 


Firearms 


2 


51 


Other and Minor Uses 


37 




Total 






45.300 



=^^"^ ^ 



Modern Wall Paneling 



"IITHILE the first cost of wall paneling is a 
little more than that of wall paper, it will 
save many times its cost in a few years and at 
the same time give you a much richer effect. 
Wall paneling is especially attractive in the dining 
room, where it should extend about two-thirds 
of the wall height. When capped by a plate 
rail, it will serve as an appropriate setting for 
rare pieces of china, etc. Other rooms that may 
be appropriately paneled are the Library and the 
Den. 

Paneling is easy to clean and to keep clean. 
We show here several designs which we can furnish 
in any wood and which can be finished in any 
color. Most of the patterns can be made appro- 
priate for other rooms than the dining room by 
merely substituting a suitable cap moulding 
for the plate rail. Do not decide to forego the 
pleasure of paneled walls without first considering 
their eventual economy. 



207 



^ 




W^all Paneling M-555 

ATTRACTIVE Dining Room paneling which may be 
. used for a Library or Den by omitting plate rail. 




Wall Paneling M-556 

ANOTHER pattern suitable for Dining Room or for 
, Library or Den by omitting plate rail. 



208 



"V. -^^^ j^ 




W^all Paneling M-557 

A REGULAR cap moulding may be substituted for 
the plate rail shown in this design and made most 
appropriate for the Living Room or Hall. 




W^all Paneling M-558 

THIS design is suitable for Living Room, Library, 
Hall or Den, by omitting the plate rail. 



209 



^£. 



^ 




W^all Paneling M-559 

AVERY rich effect for the Dining Room 
or Den. 




W^all Paneling M-560 

THE plate rail may be omitted and this design used 
in any room where paneling is desired. 



210 



,^ 



Linen Cabinets, Wardrobes and 

Pantry Cases 



AFTER all the thought which has been given to 
the planning of their home, many move into 
that home to find they have neglected to provide 
sufficient room for linen, clothing, kitchen utensils, 
etc. You know well that there is never too much 
room for these items and while you are planning, 
it will be advisable to picture in your mind just 
how much room you will need for them. Itemize 
the many articles you now have tucked away, 
out of sight. Will there be sufficient room in your 
new home for all of these things? This is a question 
you should consider well. If you find you will not 
have enough cabinet and closet space, look over 
the following pages and see if there is not some 
place in your home where one of these patterns 
will exactly fit. 



211 



"^ ^^^^ 




W^ardrobe M-570 

Inside measure 3' 6" wide x 7' 0" high, 18" deep. 

Part of case sets in recess and part sets out into room . 
Can also be made to fit in wall recess or set entirely out 
in room. 




Wardrobe M-571 

To set in wall recess 3' 6" wide, 8' 0" high. 
18" deep. 
Can also be set out in room if desired. 



^ ^^^^ 




Linen Case M-5 75 

To set in wall recess 4' 0" wide, T 0" long, 14" deep 
(inside measure). 
Rough opening 4' 3" wide, 1' 2" high,* 15" deep. 
Can also be set out in room if desired. 





i 
1 






% 





Linen Case M-576 

To set in wall recess 3' 6" wide, 7' 0" high, 12" deep 
(inside measure). 
Rough opening 3' 9" wide, 7' 2" high, 13" deep. 
Can also be set out in room if desired. 



213 



^ '''^ 



' 





^^1 


■ 




1 




I 






■ 






1 


^v^y ^ 


.,„.„.„,,...:. . . ^_ '^m 




■■■■■iii:^ 



Cupboard M-580 

To set between walls over-all 4' 6" wide, 6' 8" high. 
Lower section 1' 4" deep. Upper section V 0" deep. 
Open counter shelf 1' 0" high. Lower section 2' 8" high. 

Can be set out in room if desired. 



i ' 



Pantry Case M-585 

To set between walls 3' 0" wide, 2' 8" high, 1' 6" deep. 
Can be set in corner or out in room if desired. 



"^^^^ ^ 




Pantry Case M-586 



5' 0" wide, 2' 8" high, 1' 6" deep. 
Can be set in recess if desired. 




Pantry Case M-587 

To set between walls 3' 6" wide, 2' 8" high, 1' 6" deep. 
Can be set in corner or out in room if desired. 




Pantry Case M-588 

To set between walls 3' 0" wide, 2' 8" high, 1' 6" deep. 
Can be set in comer or out in room if desired. 



^^i^i^ 



Door Differences 



DOORS are not all alike, any more than are 
pianos, cameras, or jewelry. Or how 
could there be a Stein way, or Kodak, or 
Tiffany, or— **Morgan?^' 

Without a good and sufficient reason Morgan 
Doors never could have reached the position 
of prominence which they occupy in the esti- 
mation of architects, dealers and experienced 
builders generally. 

There's satisfaction in the possession of 
doors and woodwork of good repute. They 
classify homes in the established valuation 
group — they protect building investments by 
insuring top prices in the event of future sale. 

But there's even more satisfaction in knowing 
in just what particular respects one's doors 
excel — why they hold their shape and retain 
their finish long after ordinary doors have 
outlived their usefulness. 

Here then, briefly are some facts about 
Morgan construction, touching only upon 
features which characterize them as different 
from ordinary doors. 

Firm Foundation. As the core is, so is the 
door. The cores for Morgan Hardwood Doors 
are built up of glued sections of white pine, 
which experience has proved to be the best 
core material. 



^^ 




Several pages could be written about intricate 
machines especially designed to translate Mor- 
gan ideals into serviceable, economical practice 



— so fast and accurate as to amaze even ex- 
perienced operators; or about successive gen- 
erations of skilled craftsmen applying their 
ever-increasing dexterity to the constant better- 
ment of Morgan products; or about the large 
proportion of Morgan designs universally 
approved as standard and accorded a place in 
the hall of the "classics." 

As concerns appearance, the veneer is the 
whole door — that's all that can be seen. The 
Morgan method gives Doors that perfect, 
smooth finish which differentiates between 
doors built up to a merit standard and those 
that are built down to a price. Reason: 
Smooth finish depends on even contact with 
the core, and this contact is possible only with 
proper core and veneer treatment as used by 
Morgan— one-quarter inch thick for exterior 
doors and one-eighth inch thick for interior 
doors. 

One-quarter Inch Veneer for Exterior Doors 
is a distinctive Morgan feature. The thick 
veneer, combined with the All- White-Pine Core, 
makes a combinaticm that will withstand the 
ravages of the imeven temperatures of the 
inside of the house and outdoors. 

The ''Wedge Dower' (Patented) insures the 
Morgan Door from coming apart on account 
of abundance of rivets in the frame. The 
skeletons, or frames, of Morgan Doors are glued 
and riveted together with many hardwood 
"wedge dowels" — not the ordinary dowels in 
common use, but specially constructed rivets, 
split at the ends to form wedges which expajid 
in the sockets when driven home in powerful 
presses. This method is similar in effect to 
upsetting the end of a metal rivet to form a 
head; but it is internal instead of external. 
The glue, penetrating the pores, "welds" all 
the parts into a perfect unit. These dowels 
are manufactured under U. S. Patent No. 
1060543. 

Morgan Doors, built as they are with 
Morgan All White Pine Cores, riveted together 
with the Morgan Wedge Dowel, and covered 
with one-quarter inch veneers for exterior doors, 
and one-eighth inch veneers for interior doors, 
are the highest that can be obtained in Door- 
craft. 



216 



^ 





This superior Wedge Dowel construction 
applies to our White Pine Doors as well. 

When properly treated after they leave our 
warehouses, Morgan Doors are not only use- 
ful, but beautiful as well, showing all the 
graining that Nature alone can produce. 

We therefore suggest that when selecting or 
specifying woodwork to be used, either in the 
home or other buildings, nothing but the very 
best be chosen. After careful analysis has 
been made we are certain our product will be 
used. 



r 



Morgan Standard Door Stickings 




Cove and Bead 
"C.asB." 




I 







Flush Moulding 

Two Sides 

"F. M. 2S." 



Raised Moulding One Side 

Flush Moulding and Bead One Side 

"R. M. 1 S.. F. M. 66 B. IS." 



^ilL^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





M-600 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers M inch thick. 
Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6W over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18'^ face, 183^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %" 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %' 



M-601 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 34 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing- — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6'' face, 63^*^ over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 183^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 



3-0x6-8, IM" 3- 0x6- 8, H^" • 3-0x6-8,134' 3- x 6- 8, 1 M' 

2-10 x 6-10, 1 H" 2-10 X 6-10, 1 W 2-10 x 6-10, 1 W 2-10 x 6-10, 1 H' 

2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H' 2-10 X 7- 0, 1 %' 2-10 x 7- 0, 1 H" 2-10 x 7- 0, 1 H' 

3- 0x7- 0, 1 H" 3- X 7- 0, 1 %" 3- x 7- 0, 1 H' 3- x 7- 0, 1 H' 

3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 3- 6 X 7- 0, lli" 3- 6 x 7- 0, 1 H' 3- 6 x 7- 0, 1 ^' 
For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-650, page 234. 
For French Door to correspond, see M-687, page 250. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^^^ 218,,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




'^"Oft^ 



t 




WUfMKBKttP"^ ^ ^"' 


— 


1 '^9B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


" 


^^^^^^^^^^^ 


e 


-i — 


i"" ■"" I 



M-602 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
_ Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 18" face, 183^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2-8x6 -8, IH' 2-8x6- 8, IM' 



3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IW 
2-10 x 7- 0, 1 H" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H" 



3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 



M-603 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }i inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated.- 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6}4" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 18^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 



2- 8x6- 
3-0x6- 
2-10 X 6-10, 
2-10 X 7- 0, 

3- 0x7- 0, 






3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %" 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %* 
3-0x6 -8, 1 M' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10x7- 0, IH' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 M' 
3- 6x7- 0. 1 3^' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^''^^ 



I 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





M-604 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers H inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6}i" over-all; 

Bottom Fail 18" face, 18^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 M" 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 M* 



3- X 6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10x6-10, IH" 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 U" 
3-0x7- 0, 1^' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 ^' 



3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H" 
2-10x7- 0, la- 
s' X 7- 0, 1 3 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 3 



M-605 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 34 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — ^Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 18^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8. 1 W 

3- 0x6- 8, IH' 
2-10x6-10, IH" 
2-10 X 7- 0. 1 H' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 3^' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8. 1 H' 
2-10x6-10. IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, IH" 
3-0x7- 0. 1%' 
3- 6x7- 0. 1 ^' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



=^ 220 ,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 



*> 2-*^^'!*JVs««i:.;3!&o^''*- -Xi'. fft, *.jjk< kv-A V ^r* 




MBM' 

.■'sSZmS *wip^% ^*1^^*^ 



'2BSH5 





M-606 

P/ai'n Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 1834" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^ 

3- X 6- 8, 1 % 
2-10x6-10, IH 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H 
3- X 7- 0, 1 ^ 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8. 1 H' 
3-0x6- 8, lU' 
2-10x6-10. IH' 
2-10x7- 0, IH' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



M-607 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 1834" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 3^' 3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 



For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-652, page 235. 



2-10x7- 0, IH' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



2-10x7- 0, IH 
3- X 7- 0, 1 ^ 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H 



For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-653, page 235. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^ '''^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





iSBSS 



M-608 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 34 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Heavy Raised Egg and Dart Moulding. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 7^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 19>^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^" 
2-10 x6- 8, IH" 
3-0x6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10x6-10, 1%" 
2-8x7- 0, 1%" 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1%" 
3-0x7- 0, IM" 



Plain Red Oak 



6x7- 
0x7- 
0x7- 
2x7- 

4x7^ 
6x7- 



0, IH" 
6, 1 H" 
0,234" 
0, 23^" 
0.2^" 
0. 2M" 



Birch 
2- 8x6- 8, IW 
3-0x6- 8, IW 

2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 H" 
2-10 X 7- 0, IW 

3- X 7- 0, 1 W 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



M-609 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 18J^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 M' 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 W 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %" 3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 %" 2-10 X 6-10, 1 H" 



2-10x7- 0, 1%" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 %" 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H" 



2-10 X 7- 0, IH" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 W 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 3^' 



For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-655, page 236. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



=^''' ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





Roff?rrsi 



M-610 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 
Veneers M inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 18'^ face, 18 J^" over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 W 

3- X 6- 8, 1 s^" 
2-10 X 6-10. 1 %" 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 %' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 %' 



3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 a 



Birch 

2- 8x6- 8, 1 3^" 

3- X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 %' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1%" 
3-0x7- 0, 1 %" 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %" 



M-611 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated, r 

Veneers M inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Heavy Plain Raised Moulding. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 714" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 18" face, 19 J^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in!l:he following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %" 
2-10x6- 8. 1%" 

3- 0x6- 8. 1%" 
2-10x6-10, 1%" 

2- 8x7- 0, \W 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1%" 

3- 0x7- 0, 1%" 



Plain Red Oak 



3- 

3- 

3- 

3- 

3-4x7- 0, 21^" 

3-6x7- 0, 234" 



6x7- 
0x7- 
0x7- 
2x7- 



0, IM" 
6. 1%" 
0, 2M" 
0. 2^" 



Birch 

2- 8x6- 8, 1%" 

3- 0x6- 8, 1^" 
2-8x7- 0, 1%" 
2-10 x 7- 0, 13 
3- 0x7- 0, 1 3 
3-6x7- 0, 1 3 



IK" 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^L 



223 



V^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




^i' I 



W^ 




''^ 



M-612 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers Ji inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18'^ face, 183^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes; 



M-613 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers J^ inch thick. 
Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 63^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 1814" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10. 1 H' 
2-10 X 7- 0. IH' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 U' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, IH' 
2-10x7- 0, 1%' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10 X 7- 0, IH' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 W 



Birch 

2- 8x6- 8, 1^' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IW 
2-10 X 7- 0, IH' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 W 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



"^ ^^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





I 



^"^^^0^ 



I 



M-614 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated 

Veneers M inch thick. 
Core— ^'Morgan'* All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6}4" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 12" face, 12^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 !<;; 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 



M-618 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6W over-all: 

Bottom Rail 12" face, 123^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



3- X 6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 %" 
2-10 X 7- 0. 1 H" 
3-0x7- 0, IH" 
3-6x7- 0, IM' 



3-0x6- 8. I'H' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10x7- 0, 1%' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8x6- 8, 1 3^' 

3- 0x6- 8. IH' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 %' 
2-10x7- 0, IM' 
3- 0x7- 0, 1 3^' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 W 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H 
2-10 X 7- 0. 1% 
3- X 7- 0, 1 ^ 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %• 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and i 



=K 225 /_ 



il 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 



J L_ 





M-619 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers M inch thick. 
Core — ''Morgan'* All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Heavy Plain Raised Moulding. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6' face, 7}4" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 12" face, 133^" over-all, 33^" to top of 

Lock Rail. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 

3- 0x6- 8, IH' 
2-10x6-10, IH" 
2-10x7- 0, IM" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H" 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H" 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10 X6-10, 1%' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1%" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 W 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H" 



These Morgan Designs can be 



M-620 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers M in^h thick. 
Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Heavy Raised Egg and Dart Moulding. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout—Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 73^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 12" face, 133^" over-all, 333^" to top of 

Lock Rail. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



page 238. 



Plain Red Oak 


Birch 


2- 8x6- 8, l^i" 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 %" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H" 


2-8x6- 8, IW 
3-0x6- 8, IH' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 
2-10x7- 0, IH' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 W 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 


For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-658 


built in other woods and sizes. 





226 



^Jfl^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





il 



M-621 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 
Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim—Heavy Raised Egg and Dart Moulding. 
Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 73^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 12" face, 133^" over-all, 333^^" to top of Lock 
Rail. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8x6- 8, IW 

3- 0x6- 8, IW 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 W 
2-10 X 7- 0. 1 H' 



0x7- 
6x7- 



0, 13 
0, 13 



Birch 

2- 8x6- 8. 

3- 0x6- 8. 
2-10 X 6-10, 
2-10 X 7- 0, 
3- X 7- 0, 
3- 6x7-0, 



M-622 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers ^ inch thick. 
Core— **Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Heavy Raised Egg and Dart Moulding. 
Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 7W' over-all* 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 193^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



1^' 
IM' 

IK" 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 M' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 %" 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 %" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 %" 
3-6x7- 0, IM" 



Birch 

2-8x6- 8, 13^' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 

2-10 X 6-10, 1 ^' 

2-10 X 7- 0, 1%' 

3- 0x7- 0, 134' 

3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and 



sizes. 



227 



=^''' Y^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





1 




'9K^ 



M-623 


M-624 


Plain Red Oak Illustrated . 


Red Birch Illustrated. 


Veneers M inch thick. 


Veneers— Special, 


Core— *'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 


Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 


Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 


Glazing^Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 


The Design of this Door is adaptable to certain styles of architecture 
and makes a very pleasing appearance when used with the proper sur- 
roundings. 


This Door is shown to give an idea of the special designs that can 
be made. 


These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods and sizes. 


1 V. 2?.8 


y<. 1 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




yORGAJj 




M-625 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 
Veneers 34 inch thick. 
Core— **Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Square. Wood Bars. 
Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 53^" face, 5}4" over-all: 
Bottom Rail 12'' face, 12'' over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2-8x6- 8. 1 %" 
3- 0x6- 8. 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10 X 7- 0, IH' 
3-0x7- 0. IH' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 li' 
2-10x6-10, 1^' 
3-0x7- 0, lU' 



M-626 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Square. 
Glazing— L 'Art Noveau Metal Bars as shown or Genuine 

Polished Plate— Plain or Beveled— or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5}4\ face 5W over-all; 

Bottom Rail 12" face, 12 over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-656, page 237. 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, 1%* 
2-10 x 7- 0. 1 U' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H" 



Birch 

2- 8x6- 8, IH' 
3-0x6- 8, IW 
2-10 x 6-10. 1 H" 
3-0x7- 0, 1%' 



For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-657, page 237 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



229 



^.Jl^ 



i 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 



TT 




P"' 



1 




DgSAfl 



M-627 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers M inch thick. 
Core— * 'Morgan*' All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Heavy Plain Flush Moulding and extra frame for 
glass. 

Glazing — Art Glass as shown set in Metal Bars or Genuine 
Polished Plate — Plain or Beveled — or Double Strength. 

Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 73^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 18" face, 193^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



M-628 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }i inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 6^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 18" face, 1834" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^^ 

3- X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3- 6 X 7- 0. 1 ^' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 3^ 

3- X 6- 8. 1 %■ 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 ^ 
2-10x7- 0, IW 
3-0x7- 0, IH' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 W 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8. 1 H' 
3-0x6- 8, IH 
2-10x6-10, IH 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 M 

3- X 7- 0, 1 M 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 ^ 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3-0x7- 0, 13^' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^^230^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




i,i^ ^^.^p««^4^-^ Tj-"^^^^^^^!Sl^^^m^W^^^^-p^^ 



M-640 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 34 inch thick. 
Core — ^'Morgan** All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Bevel Sticking, Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Plain Plate as shown or Bevel Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rails 3M" face, S^^" over-all; Bottom Rail 8^^" face, 9" over-all. 



EacMDoor 2-6 x 6-8, 1 %' 
Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1 M' 
Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 3^', 
Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1%", 
Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 %', 
Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1 M' 



Birch 

Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1U\ opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 



Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak 
Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1 H'. opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 

, opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 Each Door 2-6 x 6-8'. 1 %"', opening in pairs 5-6 x 6-8 

, opening m pairs 5-4 x 6-8 Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1%", opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 

, opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 %^ opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 

, opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 %\ opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 

, opening m pairs 5-4 x 7-0 Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 ^i\ opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 

, opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1%", opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 



Tills Morgan Design can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^ 



231 



A^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




M-641 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 
Trim — Plain Flush Moulding. 

This Design should be at least three feet wide and not less than 1^ ' thick. 

The illustration shows a Dutch Door. Either upper or lower part can be opened and 
closed independent of the other. For a single Door of this design, see M-50, page 53 

T^his Morgan Design can be built in all sizes. 



^. 



232 



2^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





M-642 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail, 414" face, 4}^' over-all; 
Bottom Rail SJ/g' face, 9}4" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

No. 1 White Pine for exterior 

2-8 X 6-8. 1 H' 

3-0x6-8, 1%' 

3-0 X 7-0, IW 

No. 1 White Pine Stiles and Rails, 3 Ply Rotary Cut 

Yellow Pine Panels for interior 

2-6x6-6, 1^' 2-0x7-0, IH 

2-0 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 2-4 X 7-0, 1 H 

2-4x6-8, 1^' 2-6x7-0, 1^ 

2-6x6-8. IH' 2-8x7-0,1^ 

2-8x6-8, lys' 3-0x7-0, 1% 

For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-711, page 260. 



M-643 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 4%" face, 4W over-all; 
Bottom Rail SJ4" face, 9M" over-all. 



Ivory or White Enamel and French Gray are the appropriate finishes 
for "Colonial" Doors and the effect is very pleasing. We advise Gum 
or Birch to obtain best results. 



This design can be built in any wood and size. 
For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-712, page 260. 



Above Morgan Design M-642 can be built in other woods and sizes. 



233 



^Jl^ 



n 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




mm 




1 




M-650 




M-651 






Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 19" face, 19y/ over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 


or Plain 


Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5}4" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 19" face, 193^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 






2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 M" 
3-0x7- 0, IVs' 




2- 8x6- 8, 1^' 
2-10 X 6-10, IH' 
3-0x7-0, IK' 






2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10x6-10, IM' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3-0x7-0,1 %' 

For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-600, page 


218. 


2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
3-0x6- 8. IH" 
2-10x6-10, IW 
2-10x7-0,1%' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 W 






^ These Mot gar 


I Designs can be built in other sizes. 




^^^ ^•^'* A^ 1 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 



ifc,f,n-J, .«^.^.^■■?.-.,^n^^i>\CA\,^y4' -^' " I 





M-652 

Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 19" face, 193^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

2- 8x6- 8, 1^' 
2-10x6-10, IK' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 M" 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2-10 x 7- 0. 1 M' 
3- 0x7- 0, IM' 

For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-606, page 221. 



M-653 

Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim— Plain Flush Moulding, Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5}4'' over-all; 

Bottom Rail 19" face, 193^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

2-8x6- 8, IH' 
2-10x6-10, IVs' 
3-0x7- 0. lys' 

2-8x6- 8, 1 H" 
3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, IH" 
2-10x7- 0, 13^' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 3^'' 
For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-607, page 221. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



235 



^^"^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





- J. 



Jt 



i§^ 





, 




M-654 


M-655 








Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 


Quality— No, 1 White Pine. 








Trim— Plain Flush Moulding. 


Trim — Heavy Raised Egg and Dart Moulding. 


- 






Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 


Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or 
Plate or Double Strength. 


Plain 






Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 19" face, 193^" over-all. 


Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 6" face, 7J^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 18" face, 193^" over-all. 








Carried in stock in the following sizes: 


Carried in stock in the following sizes: 








2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 ^' 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 M" 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 3- X 6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 Vs' 2-10 X 6-10, 1 H" 

2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 H' 2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 W 

3- X 7- 0, 1 Vs' 2-10 X 7- 0, 1 M' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 W 


2-8 X 6-8, 1 H' 2-10 X 6-10, 1 W 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H' 2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3-0x6-8, IW 3-0x7- 0, IH' 

For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-608, page 222 








These Morgan Designs 


can be built in other sizes. 






^. 


V^ 


1 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 









l-ioM^ 



feS-^ 



M-656 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Square. Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout — Stile and Top Rail 5" face, 5'' over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 12" over-all. 



M.657 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Square. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout — Stile and Top Rail 5" face, 5" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12^ face, 12" over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-8 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H" 
3-0x6-8, IH" 



2-10x6-10, IM' 
2-10x7- 0, 1%" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-8 X 6-8, 1 Vg' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 %' 
3-0x6-8, IH' 



2-10x6-10, IM" 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 U' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 M' 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-625, page 229. For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-626, page 229. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^Jfl^ 



i 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





M-658 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Heavy Raised Egg and Dart Moulding. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 63^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 10" face, UK" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

2-8x6-8, IK" 2-10x6-10,1^" 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H" 2-10 X 7- 0, 1 %" 
3-0 X 6-8, IH" 3- X 7- 0, 1 H" 



M-659 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead, Bevel Wood Bars. - 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5}4" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9M" face, 9M" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H" 
3-0x7- 0, IH" 
2- 8x6- 8, IH" 



3- X 6- 8. 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10 x 7- 0, 1 H" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 ^' 



For corresponding design in Hardwood , see M-620, page 226. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



238 



^^^"^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




mmm 




'4og^ 




M-660 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9M'' face, 9%" over-all. 



M-661 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Plain Plate as shown or Bevel 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9H" face, 9H" over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 Vs" 
2-10x6-10, IH" 

3- Ox 7- 0, IH' 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 



3-0x6- 8. IH" 
2-10x6-10, IM' 
2-10x7- 0, IW 
3-0x7- 0, IM' 



Carried in stock in 


the following sizes: 


2-6x6- 6, IVs" 
2-8x6- 8, IH" 
2-10 x 6-10, 1 H' 
3-0x7- 0, IK' 


2-8x6- 8, IM' 
3- X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10x6-10, IH" 
2-10x7- 0, 1%' 
3-0x7- 0, 1 W 



These Morgan Des/gns can be built in other sizes. 



^''' ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 



_ niTiri iiiiiiTiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiinr' "" 





tab' 




M-662 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5'' face, 5W over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9M" face, 9^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



M-663 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout—Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 19" face, 19^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-6x6- 
2- 8x6- 
2-10 X 6-10, 
2-8x7- 0, 



3-0x7- 0, 13 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 

2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 %' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 %' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 U' 



2- 6x6- 6, 1%' 
2-8x6- 8, IH' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 Vs' 
3-0x7- 0, 15^' 



2-8x6- 8, IH' 
3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 

2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 U' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 H' 

3- X 7-0, 1%' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



=^ 240 ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





i 




M-664 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

^^t^r^^^'^'Z Pj^^shed Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5W' over-all- 
Bottom Rail 9^" face, BH" over-all 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 H 
2- 8x6- 8, 1 3^ 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 U 
2- 8 X 7- 0. 1 3^ 
3-0x7- 0, 1 % 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^ 

3- X 6- 8, 1 ^ 
2-10 X 6-10. 1 3X' 
2-8x7- 0, 1 H' 
2-10x7- 0, IH 
3- X 7- 0, 1 5i 



M-665 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 
Trim- Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

*^^^pr!~*^^^"^"u^, Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout-Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all ; 
Bottom Rail 9^" face, 9H" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 6x6- 6, IH' 

2- 8x6- 8, lyg' 
2-10x6-10, ly.' 

3- 0x7- 0, 1 y^' 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IW 
2-10x7- 0, 1%' 
3-0x7- 0, 13^' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



241 



^^">^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




^5^1^ 




R^I^ 



1 


M-666 


M-667 




Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 


Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 




Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 


Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 




Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or 
Plate or Double Strength. 


Plain Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or 
Plate or Double Strength. 


Plain 


Layout—Stiles and Top Rail 4W face, 4%" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9^" face, 9H" over-all. 


Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 434" face, 4% over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9}i" face, 9W over-all. 




Carried in stock in the following sizes: 


Carried in stock in the following sizes: 




2- 6x6- 6,13^' 2- 8x6- 8,1^' 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 2-10 X 6-10, 1 %" 
2-10x6-10,15^' 2-10x7-0,13^* 
2-8x7- 0, 1%" 3-0x7- 0, 1%* 
3-0x7- 0, IK" 


2-6x6-6,13^" 2-8x6-8.1^' 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, ll^" 2-10x7-0,1^' 
2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 Vg' 3- X 7- 0. 1 ^' 
3-0x7- 0, IK' 


1 


These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 
,^ 0/10 >- 




^ ^ -^-2 ^ 1 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





I I 

; i 



M-668 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5}4" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9M" face, 9M" over-all. 



M-669 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. Bevel Wood Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4M", face 4H" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9^" face, 9M" over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 %' 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 Vs' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-8x7- 0, IVs" 
3-0x7- 0, lU" 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %' 

2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 H' 
2-10x7- 0, IH" 

3- X 7- 0, 1 %" 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 M' 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H" 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 Vs" 2-10 X 6-10, 1 U" 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 Vs" 2-10 X 7- 0. 1 %' 
2-8x7- 0, 1^' 3-0x7- 0.1^' 

3- 0x7- 0, IK* 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^j!i^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





M-670 

Quality—No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4J^" face, 45i" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9H" face, 9%" over-all. 



M-671 

Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4W face, 4W over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9M" face, 9W over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 6x6- 6, IVs' 
2- 6 X 6- 8, 1 Vs' 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, IVs' 
2-8x7- 0, IK' 
3-0x7- 0, 1%' 



2- 8x6- 8, IH' 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-8x7- 0, IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, IW 
3-0x7- 0, 1%' 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 ^ 
2- 6 X 6- 8, 1 ^ 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^ 
2-10x6-10, II 

2- 8x7- 0, U 

3- X 7- 0, 1 ^ 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %' 

3- 0x6- 8, IW 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 

2- 8x7- 0, 1 ^' 
2-10 X 7- 0. 1 %' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 M' 



These Morgan Designs can be built m other sizes. 



244 



"^^^^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 



y\\\\\iiliiM 





r' 



■ilS 



M-672 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 



M-673 

Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove an Bead. 



Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain Glazing—Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. Plate or Double Strength. 



Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5J^* over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9W face. 9^" over-all. 



Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^" face, AH" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9H" face, 9H" over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 Vs' 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 

3- X 7- 0. 1 H' 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

2-6x6- 6, IH' 

2- 8x6- 8. IH' 
2-10x6-10. 13^' 

3- Ox 7- 0. IH' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



245 



^"°^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





rmm 



M-674 

Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^" face, 4Ji" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 934" face, 9%" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



M-675 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4M" face, 4M" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9^" face, 9%' over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2- 6 X 6- 6, 1 Vs' 
2- 6 X 6- 8, 1 H* 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 

2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 H' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 Vs" 



2-6x6- 

2- 8x6- 
2-10 X 6- 

3- 0x6- 
2-10 x 6-10; 
2-8x7- 0, 
2-10 X 7- 0, 
3-0x7- 0, 



2-6x6- 6, 1^' 

2- 6 X 6- 8, 1 Vs' 
2-8x6- 8, 1%' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 Vs" 
2-8x7- 0, 1^' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 %' 



2-6x6- 8, 

2-8x6- 8, 

2-10 X 6- 8, 

3-0x6- 8, 
2-10 X 6-10, 

2-8x7- 0, 

2-10 X 7- 0, 

3-0x7- 0, 



1%' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^ 



246 



^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DO O R S 





0O^ 



M-676 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^" face, 4^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9M" face, 9%" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the^ following sizes: 

2- 8 X 6- 8. 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H" 

3- 0x7-0, 13^' 



M-677 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Heavy Raised Mould outside, Flush Mould inside. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^ face, 6" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9H" face, 10^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 
2-8x6-8, IK' 

2-8x6- 8, IM" 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 W 
3- X 7- 0. 1 ^' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



247 



^i^ ^ 



IT" 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




M-685 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Plain Plate as shown or Bevel Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout—Stiles and Top Rail 3}4" face, 33^" over-all; Bottom Rail S% face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1 3^', opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 

Each Door 2-6 x 6-8, 1 H'. opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 ' 

Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, IVs', opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 

Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 %', opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 

Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 H'. opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 

Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 %', opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 

Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1 %', opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 

For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-726, page 263. 

This Morgan Design can be built in other sizes. 



^ '''^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 

xzzrzzi: 




:v 



M-686 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Plain Plate as shown or Bevel Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail SVs' face, 33^" over-all; Bottom Rail 8^^" face, 9" over-ai: 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1 % 
Each Door 2-6 x 6-8, 1 %', 
Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1%' 
Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 %', 
Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 %' 
Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 H' 
Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1 %' 



opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 
, opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 
', opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 
', opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 
', opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 
, opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 
, opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-725, page 262. 
This Morgan Design can be built in other sizes. 



^^^Zj^ 



V 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 




I "imm 





.^^■i^hmI 






1 1 


!- 




d^ 



goHiSi 



M-687 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, SVs" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 123^" over-all. 



M-688 

Quality — No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5?^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 12^^" over-all. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-6x6-8, IH" 
2-8x6-8, IM" 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 
2-6x7- 0, IH' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 %" 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-6 X 6-8, 1 3 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 3 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2-6x7- 0, IH' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-728, page 264. 



These designs can be used for exterior or interior. We recommend 1 % inch thick for exterior use. 
These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^'"^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED EXTERIOR DOORS 





g§H§l 



M-689 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing—Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, SJ^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 123^" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-6 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 %' 



2- 8x6- 8, IH" 
2-10x6-10, 1^" 
2-6x7- 0, 1^" 

3- 0x7- 0, 1^4' 



M-690 

Quality— No. 1 White Pine. 

Trim— Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, SVs" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 12^" over-ail. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-6 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H" 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10 X 6-10. 1 H' 

2- 6 X 7- 0, 1 ^' 

3- X 7- 0. 1 ^A' 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-727, page 264. 



For corresjx>nding design in Hardwood, see M-729, page 265. 



These designs can be used for exterior or interior. We recommend 1 % inch thick for exterior use. 
These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



251 



^^^'^^ '-^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





M-700 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers }/$ inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan** All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4W face, 4J^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail S%" face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak and Birch 



2-0 X 6-0, 
2-0 X 6-6, 
2-4 X 6-6, 
2-6 X 6-6, 
2-0 X 6-8, 
2-2 X 6-8, 
2-4 X 6-8, 
2-6 X 6-8. 1 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 ^ 



2-0 X 7-0, IH' 
2-4 x7-0. IH' 
2-6x7-0, 1%' 
2-8 X 7-0, lys" 
3-0 x 7-0, lyg' 



2-8 X 6-8, 1 M* 
3-0x6-8, IH" 
2-6 X 7-0, 1^4" 
2-8 X 7-0. 1 %" 
3-0 X 7-0, 1 H' 
For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-800, pages 266 and 267. 

This Morgan Design can be 



M-700 

Quarter Sawed Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 43^" face, 4%" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 8^" face, 9" over-all. 



Quarter Sawed Oak is shown aiaove to illustrate the beauties of this 
wood. The figure and grain vary in every piece of veneer. Some pieces 
will run to large flake, others to smaller flake and still others to small 
lines, while quite frequently pieces show flakes and lines combined. 



The above Quarter Sawed Oak Door built in any size. 



For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-800, pages 266 and 267. 
built in other ^oods and sizes. 



252 



^^.r^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





f 



M-701 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated, 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4M" face, 414" over-all: 

Bottom Rail 85^" face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



M-702 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan*' All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^" face, 4%" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 8^" face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^• 
2-8x7- 0, IM' 
2-10x7- 0, IW 

3- X 7- 0, 1 %' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 U' 
2-8x7- 0, IW 
2-10x7- 0, IW 
3-0x7- 0, IH' 



Plain Red Oak 
2-6 X 6-6, 1 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 
2-4 X 6-8, 
2-6 X 6-8, 
2-8 X 6-8, 
2-6 X 7-0, 



1% 
IH 
1%- 

2-8 X 7-0, 1 K 

2-8 X 7-0, 1 3 
3-0 X 7-0, 1 1 



Birch 
2-6 X 6-6, 1 H' 
2-0 x6-8, IH' 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 H' 
2-6x6-8, IH' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H' 

3-0 X 7-0, 1 %' 



For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-802, page 268- 
These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^ 



253 



J^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 




i 











BS® I^^.V.48^^ 



M-703 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 

Core — ''Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 

Panels — Three Ply. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 113^" face, 12'' over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sijtes: 
Birch 
2-0x6-0,1^' 2- 



2-6 X 6-6, 1 3 
2-0 X 6-8. 1 3 
2-4x6-8, 1^" 
2-6 X 6-8, 1 M' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H' 



X 7-0, 1 H' 
2- 4x7-0, IH' 
2- 6 X 7-0, 1 H' 

2- 8 X 7-0, 1 W 
2-10 X 7-0, 1 W 

3- X 7-0, 1 %' 



M.703 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 

Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 

Panels— Three Ply. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5}4" over-all; 
Bottom Rail UW face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

Plain Red Oak 

2-0 X 6-0, IH" 2- X 7-0, 1 H' 



2-6x6-6, 1%" 
2-0x6-8, IH" 
2-4x6-8, l^r 
2-6x6-8, IH" 
2-8x6-8, IH' 



2- 4 x 7-0, 1 H* 
2- 6x7-0, IH" 

2- 8 X 7-0, 1 H" 
2-10x7-0, IH" 

3- X 7-0, 1 H' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



"^ 



254 



/^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 




^^S 




M-703 with Inlay M-933 

Selected Mahogany Illustrated, 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 

Core— ^'Morgan** All White Pine Laminated. 

Panels— Three Ply. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, S}i" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 113^" face, 12" over-all. 



This illustration shows the effect of inlay when applied to our one -panel 
doors. Any inlay shown on pages 284 and 285 can be used. 



This Door built in all woods and sizes with any inlay design. 



M-704 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core — * 'Morgan*' All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5^ over-all; 

Bottom Rail 11 3^'' face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

\ 2- 8 X 6-8, IW 2- 8 X 6-8. 1 %' 

2- 8x7-0, IH' 2- 8x7-0, IM' 
2-10 X 7-0, 1 H' 2-10 X 7-0, 1 W 

3- 0x7-0. 1%" 3- 0x7-0, 1^" 



Above Morgan Design M-704 can be built in other woods and sizes. 



=^255 ,j^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





M-705 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 5}4" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 113^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

Plain Red Oak 
2-6 X 6-6, 1 W 2-0 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 Vg' 2-4 X 7-0, 1 ^' 
2-2 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 2-6 x 7-0, 1 Vs' 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 H' 2-8 x 7-0. 1 ^' 
2-6 X 6-8, 1 %' 3-0 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-8x6-8. IVs' 

2- 8 X 6-8, 1 H' 

2- 6 X 7-0, 1 %' 

2- 8 X 7-0, 1 ^' 
2-10 X 7-0, 1 W 

3- X 7-0, 1 W 

For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-805, page 268. 

This Morgan Design can 



M-705 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan** All White Pine Laminated. 
Panels — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail UW face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 
Birch 
2-0 X 6-6, 1 H' : 
2-4 X 6-6. 1 %' : 
2-6x6-6.1'^' : 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 3^' 
2-2x6-8, IVg' 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 

2- 8 X 6-8, 1 H' 

2- 6 X 7-0, 1 %' 

2- 8 X 7-0. 1 %' 
2-10 X 7-0, 1 %' 

3- X 7-0, 1 H' 

For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-805, page 268. 
be built in other -woods and sizes. 



X 7-0. 1 ys' 
•Z- 4x 7-0, 1 H' 
2- 6 X 7-0, 1 H' 

2- 8x7-0, IH' 
2-10 X 7-0. 1%' 

3- Ox 7-0, lys' 



256 



^J^l^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





M-706 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated, 
Panels^ — Three Ply. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Gla^ng— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^*' over-all; 

Bottom Rail liy/ face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak 



2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, lU' 
3-0x7- 0, 1%' 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10. 1 %' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 ^• 
3-0x7- 0, IH' 



M-707 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 

Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 

Panels — Three Ply. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 43^" face, 4%" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 8^" face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak 



2-6 X 6-6, 1 %' 

2-0 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 

2-4x6-8, lys' 

2-6 X 6-8. 1 Vs' 

2-8 X 6-8. 1 %' 



Birch 

2-6 X 6-6, 1 Vs 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 Ys 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 H' 
2-6 X 6-8. 1 Vs 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 Vs 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^^ 



257 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





M-708 

Birch Illustrated 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminarted. 
Panel— Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 43^'^ face, 4J4" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 11^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 
2-6x6-6, IVs' 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 ys' 
2-4x6-8, 1^' 
2-6 X 6-8. 1 Vs' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 Vs' 
2-0 X 7-0, 1 Vs' 
2-4 X 7-0, 1 Vs' 
2-6 X 7-0, 1 Vs' 
2-8 X 7-0. 1 Vs' 
2-8x7-0, IH' 
3-0x7-0, IH" 



Birch 

2-6 X 6-6, 1 %' 
2-0x6-8, lys' 
2-4 x6-8. lys' 
2-6 X 6-8. 1 ys' 
2-8x6-8, lys' 
2-0 X 7-0, 1 ys' 
2-4 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-6x7-0, IH' 
2-8x7-0, IK' 



M-709 

Birch Illustrated. 
Veneers J^ inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel— Three Ply, 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 43^" face, 4J^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail llj^' face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes; 



Plain Red Oak 

2- 8x6- 8, IM' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10x7- 0, IH' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 W 



Birch 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^' 
2-10x6-10, 1%' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1^' 
3-0x7- 0, IH' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



258 



^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





M-710 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel — Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Square. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 53^" face, 5^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 
Birch 



2-6x6-6, IH' 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 H' 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 H' 
2-6x6-8, IH' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 H' 



2-0x7-0, 1^' 
2-4 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-6 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-8 X 7-0, ] H' 
3-0 X 7-0. 1 Vs' 



M-710 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel — Three Ply. 
Trim — SoUd Stuck, Square. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 53^" face, 53^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 

Plain Red Oak 

2-6 X 6-6, I %'_ 2-0 X 7-0. 1 H' 



2-0 X 6-8, 1 ^ 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 ^ 

2-6x6-8, IH' 
2-8 X 6-8. 1 %' 



2-4 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-6 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-8 X 7-0. 1 H' 
3-0x7-0, IH' 



3-0 X 7-0, 1 W 
For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-810, page 269. 



3-0 I 7-0, 1 H' 
For corresponding design in Softwood, see M-810, page 269. 

This Morgan Design can be built in other woods and sizes. 



'^''' ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 



p Z^^sa ;: :^^: :: ^ - -::^« ' - -Jjs^^^ni^ 



^ 





M-711 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core--' 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel— Three Ply. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^" face, iW over-all 
Bottom Rail 8^" face, 9'' over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2-6x6-6, IH' 2-6x6-6, 1" 
2-0 X 6-8. 1 H' " ' 
2-4x6-8, IH' 
2-6 x 6-8, 1 H' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 %' 
2-0 X 7-0. 1 ^ 
2-4 X 7^, 1 %■ 
2-6x7-0, IH 
2-8x7-0, 1% 
3-0 X 7-0, 1 ■ 



2-0x6-8, Ws' 
2-4x6-8, IH' 
2-6x6-8 IH' 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 %' 
2-0 X 7-0, 1 Vs' 
2-4 X 7-0. 1%' 
2-6 X 7-0, 1 H' 
2-8 X 7-0, 1 %' 
3-0x7-0, IVs' 
For corresponding design in Softv/ood, see M-642, page 233. 

Above Morgan Design M-711 can bt 



M-712 

Gum with Ivory Finish Illustrated, 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel— Three Ply. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4}i" face, 4J^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 85^" face, 9" over-all. 



Ivory or White Enamel and French Gray are the appropriate finishes 
for "Colonial'* Doors and the effect is very pleasing. We advise Gum 
or Birch to obtain best lerults. 



This design built in any wood and size. 



For corresponding design for exterior, see M-643, page 233. 
built in other woods and sizes. 



^^!!1^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 








M-713 

Red Gum Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel— Three Ply. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 43^" face, V/s' over-all; 
Bottom Rail SH" face, 9" over-all. 



M-714 

Brown Ash Illustrated. 

Veneers % inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan'' All White Pine Laminated. 
Panel— Three Ply. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 43^" face, 4%" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 8^" face, 9" over-all. 



The illustration above is to show the beautiful grain of Red Gum. 
It is now recognized as one o the better woods for interior finish and 
furniture. The satiny finish is hard to excel. 



Brown Ash is known for the fairly large figure, which is so much desired 
by many. The design shown above is one of our many "Colonial" Doors 
which are being used extensively in some sections. The texture is about 
the same as that of Plain Red Oak and will take about the same color 
finishes. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods and sizes. 



=^'''^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 



I 



Wm 



M-725 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core — ''Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Plain Plate as shown or Bevel Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 3^" face, SJ^" over-all; Bottom Rail S%" face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 



Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1%', 
Each Door 2-6 x 6-8, 1 H" 
Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1 W 
Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 ^' 
Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 H'. 
Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 ^', 
Each Door 3-0 x 7-0. 1 H' 



opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 
, opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 
, opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 
, opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 
opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 
opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 
, opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 



Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1 % 
Each Door 2-6 x 6-8, 1 %"■ 
Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1 %' 
Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 %■ 
Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 %' 
Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 H", 
Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1 %'. 



, opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 
opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 
opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 
, opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 
, opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 
opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 
opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 



For corresponding design in White Pme, see M-686, page 249. 
This Morgan design can be built in other woods and sizes. 



"^^ 262,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 




fl^^ 



M-726 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail Sy/ face, 3W over-all; Bottom Rail SH" face, 9" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 

Plain Red Oak Birch 

Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, IH'. opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 Each Door 2-0 x 6-8, 1%', opening in pairs 4-0 x 6-8 

Each Door 2-6 x 6-8, 1 %', opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 Each Door 2-6 x 6-8. 1%', opening in pairs 5-0 x 6-8 

Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1%', opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 Each Door 2-8 x 6-8, 1 K'. opening in pairs 5-4 x 6-8 

Each Door 2-0 x 7-0. 1 ^', opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 Each Door 2-0 x 7-0, 1 %', opening in pairs 4-0 x 7-0 

Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 H', opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 Each Door 2-6 x 7-0, 1 ^'. opening in pairs 5-0 x 7-0 

Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 W, opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 Each Door 2-8 x 7-0, 1 W, opening in pairs 5-4 x 7-0 

Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1 M'. opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 Each Door 3-0 x 7-0, 1 ^', opening in pairs 6-0 x 7-0 

For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-685, page 248. 
This Morgan Design can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^ 



263 



A^ 



mm 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 



» «i-,-K».fe Vhki.jiit^''^ 



F>t/: 





[OPOA^ 



M-727 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core— "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim— Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 11^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Birch 



Plain Red Oak 

2- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2- 6 X 6- 8. 1 %• 
2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1^' 
2- X 7- 0, 1 li' 
2- 6 X 7- 0, 1 3^' 
2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 ^' 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 8^' 
3-0x7- a 1^' 
For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-689, page 251. 

These Morgan Designs can be 



2-0x6 
2-6x6 

2- 8x6- 8 
2-10 X 6-10, 
2-0x7- 0, 
2-6x7- 
2-8x7- 

3- 0x7- 0, 






M-728 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers 3^ inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 514" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 113^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 

Plain Red Oak Birch 

2- X 6- 8, 1 3^" 2- X 6- 8, 1 W 

2- 6x6- 8, 1 H" 2- 6 X 6- 8, 1 %' 

2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 ^^ 2- 8 X 6- 8, 1 U' 

2-10x6-10,134' 2-10x6-10.1^' 

2-0x7- 0, IH' 2-0x7- 0, IH" 

2- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %" 2- 6 X 7- 0. 1 %' 
2-8x7- 0, 1%' 2-8x7- 0. IH' 
2-10 X 7- 0, IH' 3-0x7- 0, IH' 

3- X 7- 0, 1 fi* 

For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-688, page 250. 
built in other ■woods and sizes. 



=^ "^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 



mmm^m^ 



giMtt^^ 




^m • 




\'OS-k^i 



M-729 

Birch Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, 53^" over -all; 

Bottom Rail 113^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Plain Red Oak Birch 

2-6x6- 8, IH' 2-6x6- 8, 1%' 

2-8x6- 8, IH' 2- 8x6- 8, 1^' 

2-10 X 6-10, 1 H' 2-10 X 6-10, 1 ^' 

2-6x7- 0, IH' 2-6x7- 0, 1 %' 

2-8x7- 0, IW 2-8x7- 0, 1%' 

2-10x7- 0, IK' 3-0x7- 0. 1 34* 



M-730 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers }4 inch thick. 
Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. 
Trim — Solid Stuck, Bevel Bars. 
Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 

Plate or Double Strength. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 5" face, SJ^" over-all; 

Bottom Rail 113^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 
Birch 
2- 6x6- 8, 13^' 
2- 8x6- 8, 1%" 



Plain Red Oak 
2-6x6- 8, IH" 
2- 8x6- 8, IH" 
2-10x6-10, 1%" 
2- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H" 
2- 8 X 7- 0, 1 W 
2-10 X 7- 0, 1 ^' 
3-0x7- 0. 1^' 



3- X 7- 0, 1 %' 
For corresponding design in White Pine, see M-690, page 251. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes 



2-10x6-10, 13 
2- 6 X 7- 0, 1 3 
2-8x7- 0, 1^" 
3-0x7- 0, 1^' 



^ 



265 



A^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 




M-800 

Solid White Pine Stiles and Rails, 3 Ply Gunn Panels Illustrated. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4}// face, 4}i" over-all; 
Bottom Rail S%" face, 9}4' over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-0 X 6-0, 1 % 
2-0 X 6-6, 1 Vs 
2-4x6-6, IVs' 
2-6 X 6-6. 1 Vs' 
2-8x6-6. IH 
2-0x6-8, IH' 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 Vg 
2-6x6-8, 1% 



2-8x6- 8, IVi 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 ^ 
2- X 7- 0. 1 H 
2- 4 X 7- 0. 1 H 
2-6x7- 0, 
2-8x7- 0, 
2-10 X 7- 0, 
3-0x7- 0, 






For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-700, page 252. 



Here is an opportunity to save — to circumvent, in a 
measure, the cost of building — without sacrificing quality 
or appearance. Century-old houses, better today than many 
a quarter of their age, still stand and serve, bearing evidence 
of their builders' judgment. Nearly all of the doors are 
White Pine, sturdy and true as of old. 

That's the kind of frames we use in the doors on this 
page and the three pages following; also. Design M-642, 
page 233. The panels are built three ply of **Gum" or 
Rotary Yellow Pine, with the exception of those in Design 
M-825, which are solid. 

Gum is called "America's Finest Cabinet Wood" and is 
employed extensively in the manufacture of high-grade 
furniture. No equal alternative for mahogany has yet been 
discovered. It takes stain or enamel better than most woods. 



This Morgan Design can be built in other sizes. 



^^ 266 ,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 




The built-up Rotary Yellow Pine fills a long felt want 
where the finish is to be "natural/' Thousands upon thou- 
sands of these doors made the Morgan Way have been in 
use for many years and are giving entire satisfaction. We 
treat the veneers in a way known only to ourselves and have 
overcome all objections to this type when made the ordinary 
way; thus placing at the command of the public doors that 
are not only very beautiful, but also economical as well 
as serviceable. 



M-800 

Solid White Pine Stiles and Rails, 3 Ply Rotary 
Yellow Pine Panels Illustrated. 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 4}4" face, 43^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail SJ^" face, 9M" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-0 X 6-0, 1 Vs 


2- 0x7-0, 1^' 


2-0 X 6-6, 1 H 


2- 4x7-0, 1%' 


2-4x6-6, IH 


2- 6 X 7-0, 1 Vs' 


2-6 x 6-6, 1 % 


2- 8x7-0, IH' 


2-0 X 6-8, 1 % 


2-10 X 7-0, 1 H' 


2-2x6-8, 1% 


' 3- 0x7-0, lys' 


2-4x6-8, 1^ 




2-6 X 6-8, 1 Vs 


' 2- 8x6-8, Ifi' 


2-8 X 6-8, 1 Vs 


3- X 7-0, 1 H' 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-700, page 252. 



This Morgan Design can be built in other sizes 



^i^i^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 




V'or- 



i.rr.;rtiiigiSiWfl | Kl li^'''' — 



M-802 

Solid White Pine Stiles and Rails, 3 Ply Rotary 
Yellow Pine Panel Illustrated, 

Trim — Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout — Stiles and Top Rail 43^" face, 43^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 8%' face, 9W over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



M-805 

Solid White Pine Stiles and Rails, 3 Ply Rotary 
Yellow Pine Panel Illustrated. 

Trim— Solid Stuck, Cove and Bead. 
Layout— Stiles and Top Rail iVs" face, 4}4' over-all; 
Bottom Rail ll^^" face, 12" over-all. 

Carried in stock in the following sizes: 



2-0x6-6, IH' 
2-4 X 6-6, 1 H' 
2-6x6-6, lys' 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 %' 



2-4 X 6-8, 1 3 
2-6 X 6-8, 1 3 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 3 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-702, page 253. 



2-0 X 6-0, 1 H 
2-0 X 6-6, 1 H 
2-4 X 6-6, 1 H 
2-6 X 6-6, 1 H 
2-0 X 6-8, 1 % 
2-2x6-8. l*A' 
2-4 X 6-8, 1 ' 
2-6 X 6-8, 1 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 
2-0 X 7-0, 1 
2-2 X 7-0, 1 



2- 4 X 7-0, 
2- 6 X 7-0, 

2- 8 X 7-0, 
2-10 X 7-0, 

3- X 7-0, 

2- 8 X 6-8, 
2- 6 X 7-0, 

2- 8 X 7-0, 
2-10 X 7-0, 

3- X 7-0, 



For correspondng design in Hardwood, see M-705, page 256. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^^^ ^^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED INTERIOR DOORS 





M-810 

Solid WhJte Pine Stiles and Rails, 3 Ply Rotary 
Yellow Pine Panels Illustrated. 

Trim— Solid Stuck, Square. 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4W face, 4^" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 12" face, 12" over-all. 



M-825 

No. 1 White Pine Illustrated. 

Trim— Solid Stuck, O. G, 

Layout— Stiles and Top Rail 4^ face, 4Ji" over-all; 
Bottom Rail 9^" face, 9M" over-all. 



Carried 
2-0 X 
2-0 X 
2-4 X 
2-6 X 
2-0 X 
2-2 X 
2-4 X 
2-6 X 
2-8 X 
2-0 X 
2-2 X 



in stock in 
6-0. 1%* 
6-6, 1%' 
6-6, 1 Vs' 
6-6. 1 %' 
6-8, I' ' 
6-8, IH' 
6-8, 1 K* 
6-8, 1 " ' 
6-8, 1 
7-0, IVs' 
7-0, 1' ■ 



the following sizes 
2- 4 X 7-0, 1 H 
2- 6x7-0, 1% 

2- 8x7-0, 1^' 
2-10 X 7-0, 1 H' 

3- 0x7-0, 1" 

2- 8x6-8, IH' 
2- 6x 7-0, 1^ 

2- 8 X 7-0, 1 %' 
2-10x7-0, 1%' 

3- X 7-0, 1 M' 



Carried in stock in the following sizes: 
2- 0x6- 0, IH' 2- Ox 7-0. 1%' 
2- 4 X 7-0, 1 %' 
2- 6x7-0, IH' 

2- 8x7-0, IH' 

3- X 7-0, 1 H' 



For corresponding design in Hardwood, see M-710, page 259. 



2-0x6- 
2-0x6- 
2-4x6- 
2-6x6- 
2-0x6- 
2-2x6- 
2- 4x6- 
2- 6x6- 8, 
2-8x6- 8, 
2- 6 X 6-10, 
2- 8 X 6-10, 
2-10 X 6-10, 



0, 1 
6, 1 
6, 1 

8, 1 

8. 1 

8, 1 

1 

1 
1 

1 



2- 8 X 6-8, 
2-10 X 6-8, 

2- 8 X 7-0, 

3- X 7-0, 



IM' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



=^^'^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED SIDELIGHTS 















1 


i 

! 

1 

1 \ 


1 




























i 



M-850 



No. 1 
W hite Pine 



M-851 



No. 1 
White Pine 



M-852 M-853 

Illustrated as follows: 

Plain 
Red Oak Birch 



M-854 



Painted or 
Enameled 



M-855 



Painted or 
Enameled 



All of the Designs illustrated carried in stock in 
the following ^voods and sizes: 

Plain Red Oak Birch No. 1 White Pine 

1-2 X 6-8, IW 1-2 X 6-8. IH" 1-2 x 6-8, IJ^" 

1-4 X 6-8, IH" 1-4 X 6-8, 1^" 1-4 x 6-8, IH" 

1-6 X 6-8, IM" 1-6 X 6-8, IH' 1-6 x 6-8, IH" 

1-2 X 7-0, m" 1-2 X 7-0, IH" 1-2 x 7-0, IH" 

1-4 X 7-0, IH" 1-4 X 7-0, IH" 1-4 x 7-0, 1|^" 

1-6 X 7-0, IM" 1-6 X 7-0, IW 1-6 x 7-0, IH" 
Glazing: Genuine Polished Plate— Plain or Beveled— Double Strength or Art Glass set in Metal. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes 



=^ 270 ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED SIDELIGHTS 




M-856 



Oak 



M-857 



Birch 



M-858 M-859 M-860 

Illustrated as follows: 

Oak Oak Birch 



M-861 



Oak 



All of the Designs illustrated carried in stock in 
the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

1-2x6-8, IW 
1-4 X 6-8, IH" 
1-6x6-8, IH" 
1-2 X 7-0, IH' 
1-4x7-0, IJi" 
1-6 X 7-0, l%" 



Birch 

1-2 X 6-8, IM" 
1-4x6-8, IH" 
1-6 X 6-8, IH" 
1-2x7-0, 1^' 
1-4x7-0, IH" 
1-6x7-0, IH" 



No. 1 White Pine 

1-2x6-8, IH' 
1-4x6-8, IH' 
1-6 X 6-8, IH' 
1-2x7-0, 1^' 
1-4x7-0, U/i" 
1-6x7-0, IH" 



Glazing: Genuine Polished Plate— Plain or Beveled— Double Strength or Art Glass set in Metal. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes 



271 



^ r^ 



The Mirror Door Is a Modern 

Necessity 



T^O BE classified as modern, your home must 
^ include mirror doors. They are Milady's first 
aid to correct dressing. It is the final glance at 
her full-length reflection which gives her that com- 
fortable feeling of assurance under scrutiny so 
much coveted by every woman. And the conveni- 
ence is no less appreciated by the men. At least 
one closet in every bedroom should have a mirror 
door. And wherever possible one should be installed 
in some convenient room where it can be used daily 
by all who leave the house. On the following page 
we show an appropriate and popular design. 

In addition to this, any of the inside panel doors 
shown on the preceding pages can be supplied with 
mirror. 



==^ 272 ^ 



I 




Mirror Door M-888 



White Enamel Finish Illustrated, 



Any design, size and wood shown as stock in Panel Doors carried in stock glazed with 
Genuine Polished Plate Mirror — Beveled or Plain. 

This Morgan Desiiiln can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^ ^^a A^ 



Morgan Flush Doors 

TV/r ORGAN Flush or Sanitary Doors are today recognized 
^^^ by the leading architects throughout the United States 
as the highest of standard door value based on Merit and Con- 
struction, Years of hard work, studying, comparing, analyzing 
and investigating, have resulted in Morgan Flush or Sanitary 
doors, which are placed on the market with entire confidence 
that they will fulfill all requirements. 

The core or foundation of all Morgan Flush Doors is built 
up of white pine, thoroughly kiln dried, using our Wedge Dowel 
Construction with six inch stiles and top rail and twelve inch 
bottom rail. This frame or foundation part of the door forms 
a perfect flush door in itself and after being put together, is 
re-dried and then planed and sanded to an even thickness. 
After this process, the cross banding is put on and upon this is 
placed the face veneer. This cross banding and the veneers 
are glued to the core with the best grade of glue under hydraulic 
presses of three hundred tons capacity, giving uniform surface 
pressure on all doors, irrespective of size. 

We have always had special and superior methods for building 
doors, and these methods are reflected in our doors with inlay. 
The strips of inlay are placed in such a manner that they permit 
hand-smoothing the entire surface of the door at one time, 
thereby eliminating all imperfect and ragged joints. This is 
the fundamental requisite for successful inlay work. 




A 3^-inch face veneer. 

B Cross banding veneers. 

C Solid rail construction with glued joints. 

D Stile construction with glued joints. 

E Edge strips to match veneers. 



^JUlj^ 



MORGAN FLUSH DOOR CONSTRUCTION 



f^"!?^ 



at 





\r-Tw 















: r 

ji 
i: 

crir:::> 



!\ n 



II 

Jj 

-ij 

e.t.vt .•/.:# 



c:-J:.:v> 

j| 




Section A-A 




Morgan Construction 



Not Morgan Construction 



Note — Fifty-four wedge dowels in each 
' 'Morgan' ' All White Pine Core. 

MORGAN DOORS are produced by 
workmen whose sole aim is to identify the 
name 'Morgan'* with all that is best in 
door design and construction. Like all 
real things, Morgan Flush Doors are often 
imitated but never equalled. 



This is the ordinary construction gen- 
erally used in manufacturing Flush or 
Sanitary Doors. Core usually built up of 
mixed soft and hardwoods. 

Note absence of dowels — not even plain 
dowels, let alone wedge dowels— and cross 
rail construction depending largely on cross 
banding and face veneers. 



^^^^^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 



IS5BS- 




aaMMjitt::.; 




M-900 


M-900 




Plain Red Oak Illustrated, 


Birch 111 


ustrated. 




Veneers — Face ^ inch thick. 
Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated, 
struction, see page 275. 


Veneers — Face }4 inch thick. 
Special con- Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated, 
struction, see page 275. 


Special con- 


Carried in stock in the following sizes: 


Carried in stock in 


the following sizes: 




Plain Red Oak 

2-0 X 6-8, IH" 2- X 7-0, 1 %" 
2-4 X 6-8, IW 2- 4 X 7-0, 1 %" 
2-6 X 6-8, 1%" 2> 6 X 7-0, 1 W 
2-8 X 6-8, 1 W 2-10 X 7-0, 1 U" 
3- 0x7-0, IH" 


Birch 

2-0x6-8, lU' 2- 0x7-0, IH' 
2-4x6-8. IH' 2- 4x7-0, IW 
2-6x6-8, IM' 2- 6x7-0, 1%' 
2-8x6-8, 1^' 2-8x7-0, IM' 
2-10 X 7-0. 1 H' 
3- X 7-0, 1 W 




This Morgan 


Design can be built in other woods and sizes. 

^ 276 ^ 







MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 







mm 



I50RGAN 




M-900 with Special Inlay 



M-900 with Inlay M-933 



Bitch Illustrated 



Quarter Sawed Oak Illustrated. 



Veneers — Face 14 inch thick. Veneers — Face 3^ inch thick. 

Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- Core — ''Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. struction, see page 275. 

Crest and number are shown to illustrate what can be done in beau- Quarter Sawed Oak is shown above to illustrate the beauties of this 

tiful inlays. Any emblem or number can be inlaid in any door shown. wood. The figure and grain vary in every piece of veneer. Some pieces 

will run to large flake and others to smaller flake, still others to small 
For woods and sizes in stock ready for inlay, see Design M-900. page 276. lines, while quite frequently pieces show flakes and lines combined. 

This door built in any size. 
Morgan Flush Doors can be built in all woods and sizes, with any inlay design. 



"Xa 277,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 





^bsaR 



M-900 with Inlay M-926 



M-900 with Ebony Inlay M-927 



Mahogany Illustrated. 



Calico Ash Illustrated, 



Veneers — Face 3^ inch thick. 

Core—-* 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 



Veneers— Face H inch thick. 

Core^"Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 



The beauty of mahogany depends upon careful selection of the veneer 
for figure and texture, as well as on proper matching of grain wherever 
joining of pieces is necessary. Morgan Mahogany Doors have always 
given entire satisfaction because of the construction and the good judg- 
ment exercised in the selection and matching of veneers. 



This attractive veneer has been named "Calico Ash" because of the 
large and variegated figure, which is the result of rotary cutting. The 
texture is very similar to that of Plain Red Oak and will take about the 
same color finishes. Any design of inlay will look well with this door. 



Morgan Flush Floors can be built in all woods a nd sizes, with any inlay design. 



=^ 278^^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 




s5^g 




M-900 with Inlay M-935 



M-901 with Inlay M-930 



Brown Ash Illustrated. 



Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 



Veneers — Face H inch thick. 

Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 



Veneers — Face K inch thick. 

Core — * 'Morgan" All White Rne Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 



This Design is attractive, not only on account of the inlay but also This illustration shows a Flush Door with glass and inlay which 

because of the brown ash veneer which is in great demand in some local- can be used in places where light is wanted. The inlay should be the 
ities, same design as used for the other interior doors. 

Morgan Flush Doors can be built in all woods and sizes, with any inlay design. 



^^ 279,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 





y^B^. 



SH^ 



M-902 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers — Face )4 inch thick. 

Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



M-903 

Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers — Face J^ inch thick. 

Core — "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. , \ 

Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

3-0x6- 8, 1%' 
2-10x6-10, IM' 
3-0x7- 0, 1 %" 
3-6x7- 0. IH" 



Birch 
3- X 6- 8, 1 %" 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 U" 
3- X 7- 0. 1 H" 
3-6x7- 0, IM" 



Plain Red Oak 

3- X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
3-0x7- 0, lU' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 34' 



Birch 

3- X 6- 8, 1 H" 
2-10x6-10. IH' 
3- X 7- 0, 1 H" 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



"^^^° ^ 



f 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 








U 



as^ 



M-904 



M-905 



Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 

Veneers — Face }i inch thick. 

Core — **Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 



Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 



Veneers— Face }4 inch thick. 

Core"'*Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing— Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 



Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 



Plain Red Oak 

3- 0x6- 8, IH' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
3-0x7- 0, IH" 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 



Birch 

3- X 6- 8, 1 M' 
2-10x6-10, IH' 
3-0x7- 0, IH' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 H' 



Plain Red Oak 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %' 
2-10x6-10, lU" 
3- X 7- 0, 1 M' 
3- 6 X 7- 0, 1 %' 



Birch 

3- X 6- 8, 1 W 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 W 
3- 0x7- 0, IH" 
3-6x7- 0, IH" 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



^^ 281^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 




ioHSi 








— 


M-906 


M-907 




Plain Red Oak Illustrated. 


Brown Ash Illustrated. 




Veneers — Face H inch thick. 

Core "Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 


Veneers — Face H inch thick. 

Core— ''Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 




Carried in stock in the following woods and sizes: 






Plain RedlOak Birch 

3- X 6- 8, 1 %" 3- X 6- 8, 1 H' 
2-10 X 6-10, 1 U" 2-10 X 6-10, 1 H" 
3. X 7- 0, 1 ^' 3- X 7- 0, 1 H' 
3-6x7- 0. IM' 3-6x7- 0, 1^' 


This is the same design as M-901, shown on page 279, without inlay 
and with a square apron under glass, which makes a pleasing combination 
for an Entrance Door. 

This Design built in any wood and size. 




Above Morgan Design M-906 can 
" . o 


jbe built in other woods and sizes. 




^ 2o. ^^ 





MORGAN STANDARDIZED FLUSH DOORS 



i~ 



1 




(U 



3 




PcS] 



M-908 



M-909 



Curly Red Birch Illustrated. 



Birch Illustrated. 



Veneers — Face 34 inch thick. 

Core — **Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 



Veneers — Face }4 inch thick. 

Core — * 'Morgan" All White Pine Laminated. Special con- 
struction, see page 275. 

Glazing — Genuine Polished Bevel Plate as shown or Plain 
Plate or Double Strength. 



This unique design is illustrated in Curly Red Birch to display the 
attractiveness of this veneer. This design used with corresponding side- 
lights is very attractive as shown in Entrance Design M-54, page 57. 



This is an unusual design and very appropriate for certain kinds of 
architecture. The inserted blocks, wedge like in appearance, must be 
very carefully handled by a master craftsman in door making. Each 
block must be inserted by hand, independent of the others. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods and sizes. 



^ 



283 



A^ 



I' .'ij .U- :<»! u.- ,t '£.»*?;%!? in": 




M-925 



1 Ess 


1 


■ 

1 


■ H 


M-926 


M-927 


^^^^^M 


r 


■ 


■■ 




M-928 



M-929 



M-930 



A NY of the Morgan Doors shown on the preceding 
XX pages can be inlaid with any of the designs shown 
above. Inlaid panels are especially attractive for 
Flush Doors. The designs shown on pages 277, 278 
and 279 are specimens of the pleasing effect of inlay. 



^^^ 284,,^ 






M-932 



M-933 




M-934 




M-935 



M-936 



INLAY designs on this page and page 284 are shown 
in ebony and holly. Other designs and woods, 
or combinations of woods, such as Rosewood, Mahog- 
any, Satinwood, Walnut, etc., can be furnished if 
desired. 



285 



^^^^ ^ 



An Over-the-Shoulder View of 
Morgan Woodwork 



IET us start by going first to the timber 
■^ lands of Wisconsin, Arkansas and Idaho, 
headquarters for the choicest pine, oak, birch, 
gum, etc. Here we meet the real beginnings 
of Morgan Woodwork— sound, healthy, stand- 
ing trees — property of the Morgan Organi- 
zation. 

We see men going from tree to tree, apprais- 
ing each one with practiced eye. Occasionally 
they stop for a more searching examination, 
matching some particular tree against the 
Morgan critical standard of perfection. If it 
stands the test, it is marked for the axe, and 
soon, with scores of others, finds its way to 
the sawmill in the wake of powerful tractors. 

There's music in the hum of the saws and 
a fragrance from the new-cut logs that announce 
our approach even before we can see the mill 
through the density of the forest. 

Imagine now, as you see the logs dissolve 
into lumber, that each board is destined to 
become a part of your home. Make your own 
selection. Set your standard high. Our alert 
inspectors will detect defects that you would 
pass by unnoticed. Worse lumber than much 
that we discard is built into doors by makers 
who cannot afford to be so particular, because 
they are compelled to buy their lumber in the 
open market while we have a practically 
unlimited supply of our own to draw upon. 

Morgan forests are intersected by private 
railways terminating at the sawmills. Up 
North, in the winter, sleds take the place of 
cars, and locomotives give way to powerful 
caterpillar engines similar in action to tanks 
of war, and equally effective. 

Now the lumber undergoes a preliminary 
drying in the open air to prepare it for the 
kilns. Careful, systematic piling, exposing 
the surface of each board, is required to insure 
uniformity. 



After months of this treatment it is off to 
the dry kilns at the factory. Here we observe 
a procedure as interesting as it is important, 
for it is here that science determines the con- 
dition of the doors and woodwork after twenty- 
five years* service. Too dry lumber is no 
better than green lumber. There's a just- 
right degree of moisture that must obtain to 
insure permanence — it's between five and 
seven per cent. 

This was a baffling problem for conscientious 
manufacturers. We have found a solution 
completely satisfactory . Frequent testing with 
delicate electrical instruments insures absolute 
accuracy. This is the real secret of Morgan 
perfection — the foundation of the Morgan 
guarantee. 

A perfect, tenacious bond unites core and 
veneer. Both are planed and sanded to an 
even smoothness and then glued together under 
tremendous hydraulic pressure, which forces 
the glue right into the pores. This pressure 
is maintained until the glue is dry. The 
process has been appropriately called ** wood- 
welding." 

Fifty thousand dollars is not an unusual 
price for an imitation of Nature — a painting. 
Nature herself paints the grain in the wood 
that is used for veneers, defying the arts of 
man to imitate its intricate designs, delicate 
texture and gorgeous coloring. 

But beautiful veneers alone do not make 
perfect woodwork. The relationship of figured 
veneer to the lines of the design must be 
strictly observed, with a fine regard for correct 
balance and proportion. 

The very selection and adaptation of appro- 
priate veneers is an art. Morgan Woodwork 
proves Morgan leadership in the development 
of this art. 



^^ 



286 



^ 



Modern Finishing for Morgan 

Woodwork 



^HE art of wood finishing has been brought 
^ to a high state of perfection and it is now 
possible to obtain in an economical manner a 
great variety of beautiful and artistic effects on 
all kinds of wood, provided the right finishing 
material is used. 

Nature has deftly outlined the grain of the 
wood with peculiar markings, some so faint as to 
be lost to the naked or untrained eye, yet others 
more pronounced. The art of wood finishing is 
the development of these markings, the bringing 
out of their latent beauty and preserving the 
wood with a permanent finish. The decorative 
value of finished woodwork, which retains its 
beauty permanently, is appreciated more today 
than ever before. It is astonishing what beauti- 
ful, inexpensive, and decorative effects may now 
be obtained on all woods ranging from ordinary 
pine to the finest oak. 

The finishing of Morgan Woodwork is most 
important. Morgan Products are the best that 
skill, experience and infinite care can produce. 
We are proud of Morgan Woodwork and that is 
why we have given special attention to the subject 
of its finishing and treatment after it leaves our 
hands. 



^^JE^ 




M-950 



M-951 




M-956 



mm 

'da 

M-957 



M-952 



M-953 



Guide to the Selection 

rpiNISHING an interior either 
-■■ intensifies or destroys the effect 
of skillfully handled fine wood- 
work. Similar results are produced 
by painting a frame exterior. Color 
is as important in design as form 
and line. The many harmonious 



^Li^Ls^ 




M-958 



M-959 



M 960 



M-961 



M-962 



M-953 



of Appropriate Colors 

color combinations afford ample 
latitude in selection. Several 
appropriate suggestions from an 
authentic source are offered on 
pages 291 and 292. For specifica- 
tions of finishes illustrated, see 
page 290. 



^ 



289 




M-966 




M-967 



M-968 



M-969 



Specifications for Morgan Interior 

Door Finishes 



Finish M-950 

Plain Oak, Natural Finish. Filled with Du Pont 
Wheeler's No. 1 Transparent Wood Filler, and fin- 
ished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport Stand- 
ard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-951 

Plain Oak, Golden Oak Finish. Stained with Du 
Pont Bridgeport Standard R Y Golden Oak 
Penetrating Stain, filled with Du Pont Wheeler's 
No. 3 Wood Filler, and finished with two coats of 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wheeler's Interior 
Varnish. 

Finish M-952 

Rotary Cut Oak, Dark Antique. Filled with Du 
Pont Wheeler's No. 5 Walnut Wood Filler, and 
finished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-953 

Rotary Cut Oak, Green Weathered Oak Finish. 
Stained with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Green 
Weathered Oak Penetrating Stain and Waxed 
Finish, filled with Du Pont Wheeler's No. 10 Wood 
Filler, and finished with two coats of Du Pont 
Bridgeport Standard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-954 

Plain Red Oak, Dark Fumed Oak Finish. Stained 
with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 1000 Dark 
Fumed Oak Acid Stain and finished with two coats 
of Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wonderlac. 

Finish M-955 

Gumwood, Circassian Walnut Finish. Stained 
with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 2303 Cir- 
cassian Walnut Penetrating Stain, given a thin 
coat of Du Pont White Shellac and finished with 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Prepared Wax. 

Finish M-956 

Quartered White Oak, Gray Finish. Stained with 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Gray Acid Stain, and 
finished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard Wonderlac. 

Finish M-957 

Quartered White Oak, Golden Oak Finish. Stained 
with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard R Y Golden 
Oak Penetrating Stain, filled with Du Pont Wheeler's 
No. 3 Wood Filler, and finished with two coats of 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wheeler's Interior 
Varnish. 

Finish M-958 

Quartered White Oak, Fumed or Craftsman Oak 
Finish. Stained with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard 
No. 1158 Fumed Oak Acid Stain, given a thin wash 
of Du Pont White Shellac, and finished with two 
coats of Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Prepared 
Wax. 

Finish M-959 

Quartered White Oak, Weathered Oak Finish. 
Stained with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wea- 
thered Oak Penetrating Stain and Waxed Finish, 
filled with Du Pont Wheeler's No. 10 Wood Filler, 
and finished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-960 

Birch, Natural Finish. Filled with Du Pont 
Wheeler's No. 7 Transparent Paste Wood Filler, 
and finished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 



Finish M-961 

Birch, Light Mahogany Finish. Stained with Du 
Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 2090 Light Mahog- 
any Penetrating Stain, givBn one coat of Du Pont 
Bndgeport Standard Mahogany Primer, and fin- 
ished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport Stand- 
ard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-962 

Birch, Medium Mahogany Finish. Stained with 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Dark Mahogany 
Penetrating Stain, given one coat of Du Pont 
Bridgeport Standard Mahogany Primer, and fin- 
ished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport Stand- 
ard Wheeler's Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-963 

Birch, Dark Mahogany Finish. Stained with Du 
Pont Bridgeport Standard Brown Mahogany Pen- 
etrating Stain, given one coat of Du Pont Bridge- 
port Standard Mahogany Primer, and finished with 
two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wheeler's 
Interior Varnish. 

Finish M-964 

Southern Pine, Satin Gray Finish. One coat of Du 
Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 2003 Add Stain 
Evener, followed by one coat of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard No. 2004 Satin Gray Acid Stain. One 
coat of Du Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 3002 
Satin Gray Toner, and finished with two coats of 
Du;Pont Bridgeport Standard Wonderlac. 

Finish M-965 

Birch, Smoked Pearl Finish. Stained with Du Pont 
Bridgeport Standard Gray Acid Stain, given a coat 
of Du Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 3001 Smoked 
Pearl Toner, and finished with two coats of DuPont 
Bridgeport Standard Wonderlac. 

Finish M-966 

Rotary Ash, Medium Golden Oak Finish. Filled 
with Du Pont Wheeler's No. 5 Walnut Wood Filler, 
and finished with two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard Wheeler's Interior Varrdsh. 

Finish M-967 

Mahogany, Light Mahogany Finish. Filled with 
Du Pont Wheeler's Mahogany Paste Wood Filler, 
and finished with three coats of Du Pont Wheeler's 
Interior Varnish, rubbed eggshell. 

Finish M-968 

Mahogany, Medium Mahogany Finish. Stained 
with Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Mahogany 
Acid Stain, filled with Du Pont Wheeler's Mahogany 
N Wood Filler, and finished with two coats of 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wheeler's Interior 
Varnish. 

Finish M-969 

Mahogany, Dark Mahogany Finish. Stained with 
Du Pont Bridgeport Standard No. 3000 A Dark 
Mahogany Acid Stain, filled with Du Pont Wheeler's 
Mahogany N Wood Filler, and finished with two 
coats of Du Pont Bridgeport Standard Wheeler*s 
Interior Varnish 

Finish M-970 

White Enamel (Not Illustrated). Apply a coat of 
White Lead in Oil thinned with two-thirds oil and 
one-third turpentine, two coats of Du Pont Enamel 
Undercoating and two coats of Du Pont Bridgeport 
Standard Wheeler's White Enamel. 



290 



^^J^l^ 



Paints and Finishes That Beautify 

and Preserve 

By Architectural Service Division, E. I. DuPoint de Nemours & Company, 

Wilmington, Delaware 



FIRST essentials in home investment are 
good materials and construction. After 
this come surface protection and beauty for 
both interior and exterior through the intelli- 
gent and timely use of high-grade wood 
finishing material. 

Good Paint Essential 

Do not overlook the fact that good paints 
and good finishing material will prove a wise 
and profitable investment, while cheap mate- 
rials will be a source of constant regret and 
expense. 

In exterior house painting, select nothing 
but the highest grade, scientifically prepared, 
properly reinforced house paint, and have it 
applied by a Master Painter. Do not follow 
the advice of anyone who does not know 
paints or painting, as to what you should or 
should not use. Write to any reputable 
manufacturer of nationally advertised paints 
for color cards and literature, in addition to 
consulting a Master Painter. Better yet, 
call at the Service Department of your local 
paint or hardware dealer, where they will 
gladly give you authoritative advice and assist 
you in a practical manner. 

If you have invested in a home built after 
your own ideals, a great deal of the pleasure 
and satisfaction it will afford you in the years 
to come is dependent on keeping it perfectly 
preserved and attractive, both inside and out. 

In painting new work, three thin coats well 
brushed out are necessary. Periodical painting 
thereafter as surface requires will keep your 
property thoroughly protected. A coat of 
paint every few years, or at the first signs of 
wear, will save many a repair bill. 

In repainting, surface conditions must receive 
consideration. If the old paint is firm and 
free from chip or scale, one coat is ample. 
Always consult a reputable painter on re- 
painting work. 

Points on Selecting Colors 

Every home presents a special study as to 
just what combination of colors is best suited 
to the particular style of architecture and 
surroundings. It must not be understood 
from this that the selection of a suitable color 
scheme is a difficult problem. Any owner 
who keeps in mind the following points can 



select a color combination that will be har- 
monious and in keeping with environments. 

A house well surrounded with trees and 
foliage appears best in the lighter colors, such 
as white, grays and creams. 

Clear or open surroundings will carry some 
of the heavier colors, such as greens, tans, 
buffs and the lighter browns, and afford a 
wide range for color selection. 

As a general rule, select light shades for all 
body colors. They are more pleasing and 
permanently satisfactory as time goes on than 
the heavy greens, browns, buffs and reds, 
which are better for trimming purposes or for 
use on restricted areas of surface. 

Always remember that white and the ex- 
treme light colors give an appearance of 
added size. Small houses appear larger in 
white and large houses smaller in the darker 
shades. 

Confine color combinations, if possible, to 
two, or at the most, three colors. If you have 
a large house with an unusual amount of 
gables, cornices and trim surface, and desire a 
varied color combination involving four or 
five colors, better consult a Master Painter 
and let him work out a harmonious combina- 
tion embodying your color preferences. 

Color Suggestions 

The Colonial type of home, with its pillars 
and wide expanse of lawn, naturally suggests 
white or light cream in solid color only, no 
trim. 

The Dutch Colonial type should likewise 
be light. Straw body color with white trim, 
olive blinds and grayish green gambrel roof 
is very appropriate. 

An alternate suggestion is pearl gray body, 
white trim and blind green roof and blinds. 

The hipped roof Colonial type, when sur- 
rounded by luxuriant planting, is set off to 
best advantage with white body, green shutters 
and red roof. A less striking effect is French 
gray body, sage green shutters and olive 
green roof. 

The American suburban type of home, with 
pyramid roof, which follows no established 
architectural style, lends itself admirably to 
gray tones, with just enough variance in the 
trim to add warmth. Body can be French 
gray; trim, greenstone; roof, light lead and 
white sash. 



===s. 291 ^ 



Where this scheme seems too cold, light 
buff can be substituted for body, light drab 
for trim and light brown for roof, with ivory 
for sash. 

Soft cream, ivory and brown, with a bit of 
green in the trim, makes a most charming 
combination for the Strictly Bungalow type 
of structure. Lower body, cream ; upper body, 
ivory white; trim, Nile green; roof brown; and 
sash, ivory white. 

The gable roof type affords more latitude 
in the way of color selection. This style of 
architecture will stand the darker colors better, 
as they have a tendency to cut down the 
general appearance of height which a gable 
roof usually gives. Where the house is sur- 
rounded by green foliage, the neutral drab 
and soft brown tones are very desirable, 
especially when a note of green is used in the 
roof treatment. The sash and entrance in 
white or cream make a bit of snappy contrast 
which prevents the whole color scheme from 
being too somber. 

While originally the name bungalow meant 
a one-story rambling building, it now applies 
in general to the small house or cottage. 
Shades of brown with white or green trim and 
a gray green roof are particularly pleasing. 
Another effective combination is gray body, 
white trim and sash, red roof and green 
shutters. 

Many bungalows have shingled sidings or 
gables, and these should be stained with a 
Creosote Shingle Stain, the browns, greens 
and reds being very desirable and popular. 

These few suggestions should assist the 
owner in making a desirable selection for 
almost any type of residence. He should bear 
in mind the fact that shrubbery and surround- 
ings form the setting and are that part of the 
color scheme already provided. 

Interior Wood Finishing 

Interior treatments are more varied and 
form even a more intimate relation with the 
owner than exterior painting. Any wood can 
be finished attractively and in a manner that 
will harmonize with furniture and furnishings, 
provided the owner will make the necessary 
effort and exercise discretion in his selection of 
finishing materials. 

We will discuss only the finishing of new 
work, inasmuch as refinishing involves too 
many details to cover intelligently in a limited 
space. 

Interiors, to a certain extent, are finished 
according to the purpose the various rooms 
serve, as well as to the type of architecture. 

White enameled woodwork and a delicate 
blue flat wall paint make a sanitary and 
pleasing combination for kitchens. Varnished 
woodwork in the natural color of the wood is 
equally satisfactory and less care. The more 



popular flat wall tones for kitchens are the 
light tones of tan, green, buff, cream and blue. 

Satisfactory interior decorative schemes are 
easily worked out where woodwork is enameled. 
Dainty sleeping room combinations are 
obtained where walls and ceilings are tinted 
with delicate shades of blue, green, or pink 
flat wall paint in connection with enameled 
woodwork. 

An unusually rich combination for a recep- 
tion room where an abundance of natural light 
prevails, is ivory enameled woodwork and an 
old rose shade of flat wall paint. This like- 
wise makes a beautiful combination for a 
guest room. 

Where a varnish finish is desired on open 
grained woods, such as oak, ash and chestnut, 
it is necessary to first use a paste wood filler. 

On close grained woods, such as birch, gum, 
pine, cypress, fir and redwood, paste filler is 
unnecessary before varnishing. 

Living rooms of oak, gum, birch, chestnut 
or ash, in gray, with a dull lacquer, are delight- 
ful, with side walls light gray and ceilings old 
ivory flat wall finish. To add life to this 
setting requires a rich red floor covering and 
mahogany finished furniture. Floors should be 
finished natural, in either wax or varnish. 

In a stately Colonial type of residence, 
white enamel woodwork with mahogany fin- 
ished furniture can hardly be improved upon. 
Ivory tint enamel can be substituted for the 
white where desired. 

While mahogany finished gum or birch is 
usually a companion for white enamel, there 
are several tones of brown which are equally 
beautiful in connection with buff or tan wall 
tints. 

Gumwood interiors are perhaps the most 
effective when finished in the Circassian 
walnut shade. Other suggested finishes are 
natural, mahogany and walnut. 

Quartered oak dining rooms finished in 
fumed oak with corresponding furniture are 
suggestive of simplicity and refinement. Side 
walls should be medium tan or light buff and 
ceilings light tan. 

An artistic living room combination with 
beamed ceiling is a mission green for trim and 
overhead beams. Ceiling space between beams 
should be light ivory flat wall tint and side 
walls light green. 

An alternate color combination is English 
oak shade for trim and beams, light tan for 
ceiling and buff side walls. 

Countless combinations are available for 
almost any room, and these are but a few of 
many that can be suggested for the more 
commonly used woods in building construc- 
tion. If you are about to build a new home, 
better write to the leading manufacturers^of 
wood finishes for finished panels. 



"V.292 ,^ 



How to Qualify for the Protection 
of the Morgan Guarantee 

T^OORS are not an exception to the truth regarding the proverbial '*ounce 
-L/ of prevention." 

There's a short period in every door's life when neglect threatens its 
whole future. At this time the door is as sensitive to moisture as a thorough- 
bred trotter in training is to drafts and sprains. 

Proper care during this deUcate period positively insures that permanent 
perfection of every detail which purchasers are justified in expecting from 
Morgan Guaranteed Perfect Doors. 

It is the time between the unwrapping of doors when they come from 
the freight house and the application of the final coat of protecting finish. 

Following our instructions throws the full burden of responsibility on 
Morgan — voluntarily assumed in our binding guarantee. Neglected pre- 
cautions forfeit all claims on the maker. 

What Every Door Needs 

The finer the exterior door the more susceptible it is to climatic and 
atmospheric changes before finishing. Therefore — 

Just as soon as the door is taken from the depot, have the finisher 
give it at least one coat of filler. Two are better, but one will do. Because 
doors are stocked and shipped ''in the white," with all the pores of the wood 
open, ready to receive moisture unless protected, they are safe in our hands 
and the packing protects them during shipment, but after this is removed 
the filler must be quickly applied. 

Don't hang your doors in a damp, freshly plastered building. This also 
refers to all fine interior finish. Mortar, of course, contains large quantities 
of water, and until the moisture has dried out of the walls, the house is unsafe 
to live in as well as to receive fine woodwork. Manufacturers cannot be 
blamed if a product upon which every care is bestowed in the making is 
not handled properly. 

A little artificial heat is a great advantage in drying out buildings before 
hanging hardwood doors. After the doors are hung and no more fitting is 
to be done, cover the ends of the stiles (both top and bottom) as well as the 
top of top rail and bottom of bottom rail, with at least one coat of paint. 
This will prevent moisture from entering the pores of the wood and is abso- 
lutely essential to the permanence of outside doors. 

In staining use oil stain only. Water stains are dangerous, tending to 
crack and loosen the veneer. 

If the above instructions are carried out after doors leave our hands, 
we can and do positively guarantee every Morgan Hardwood Door to be 
a Perfect Door; and furthermore, it will stay perfect and will prove a thing 
of lasting beauty. 



=V. ^93 ^ 



Hardware That Harmonizes 



Written and illustrated especially 

for '^Building With Assurance" 

By P. & F. Corbin 



A MORGAN door deserves good hardware, 
in a finish in harmony with the color 
of the wood, of a design that carries out the 
ornamental motives, and of a quality that will 
be as satisfactory as that of the 
/"^ Ik door itself. Anything inferior 
V - m lessens the value and impairs 

^^^;jfm the effect, while a proper selec- 
tion will not only heighten the 
t favorable impression but by 

ease of action, security and 
convenience, will prove a source 
of lasting satisfaction. 
Outside doors, for instance, should be hung 
on bronze or brass butts, in order to avoid the 
rust that results from the exposure of iron and 
steel. Three butts should be used to dis- 
tribute the load, and they should be heavy 
enough to avoid any danger of wear which 
will cause the door to sag. The lock should 
be chosen for security, and for convenience 
should have a thumb piece on the inside, to 
throw the dead bolt, instead of a key. It is 
usual, in modern front door locks, to have a 



It is in the knob and escutcheon, or handle, 
that the greatest opportunity for exercising 
good taste is found. Simplicity of design, 
with ornamental details in harmony with the 
other motives in the entrance, are the rule. 
In Colonial buildings, modern handles which 




reproduce the types used in Revolutionary 
times are favorites, and Colonial knockers are 
often employed to give the final touch of artis- 
tic completeness. Both handles and knockers 





stop in the face which makes the outer knob 
rigid and locks the door without the use of 
the dead bolt. 



are made in exact reproduction of the graceful 
hand-wrought patterns of the days when artist- 
blacksmiths did creative work. 



^^^^^ 



For inside openings with lighter doors, two 
butts are generally used, and these are fre- 
quently of steel or cast iron, brass or bronze 
plated. Cast iron butts have the advantage 
of being practically indestructible, as the points 




of contact glaze, causing a stoppage of wear, 
while the carbon content of the metal has 
lubricating action. Butts of this type have 
been in use on European cathedrals for hun- 
dreds of years and still give as good service 
as at first. 




Wi[e 



Locks for inside doors are chosen to give 
privacy, and are simple in function and con- 
struction. Glass knobs are in favor, because 
of their cleanliness and beauty, with graceful 



Colonial types or key plates, although many 
patterns of knobs and escutcheons in the va- 
rious schools of art are available. 

Closet doors should have the same equip- 
ment as other inside doors, with the possible 
exception of the use of a small knob on the 
inside. The practice of having no knob on 
the inside has been abandoned because of the 
danger of accidentally imprisoning some one. 

Bathroom doors usually have bronze butts, 
to avoid rusting. The best locks have a thumb 
piece on the inside instead of a key. 



M b 



IH "S 



Casement windows have given use to a large 
variety of fastening devices. One should be 
chosen which draws the sash firmly into the 
casing, eliminating drafts. A good adjuster, 
which will hold the sash open at any point, 
is also a necessity. Brass or bronze butts 
should be used, because of their exposure. For 
double hung windows, a type of fastener which 
draws the two sash together is essential, to- 
gether with good pulleys which do not squeak 
or break, or cause the wheel to strike or unduly 
wear the cord. A type of pulley in which the 
wheel runs free upon a fixed axle will give 
longer wear than one in which the axle turns 
in a hole bored in the thin casing. 

The finishes approved by good taste are 
polished bronze or dull brass, with nickel plate 
for bathrooms and kitchen. Old copper is 
also popular. There are many other finishes 
procurable, and one can be chosen which 
harmonizes with the color of the woodwork 
and matches the lighting fixtures and other 
metal fittings. 



295 



^^^^^ 



Window Troubles: How to 
Avoid Them 



TV yrUCH of the pleasure to be derived from otherwise 
^^^ splendid houses is often marred by rattling, leaky 
glass in windows and doors. 

This is one of the most common faults in building. Home 
owners endure it only because they believe it unavoidable. 

It ''grates on one's nerves," it points out defects to 
visitors whose opinions we cherish, it causes drafts 
which menace health, it is downright wasteful, making 
excessive demands on the fuel supply. Yet it is wholly 
unnecessary. Window troubles, like all other common 
errors of home-building, can be avoided by a little care- 
ful thought. Simply specifying Morgan Doors and Win- 
dows insures absolute, permanent freedom from all these 
annoying experiences. 

The glass in Morgan Products rests in a bed of pure 
linseed oil putty, made by a special process according 
to an exclusive Morgan formula — not the common, 
commercial kind. Our putty completely surrounds the 
edges of the glass, forming a soft, plastic cushion which 
absorbs shocks, excludes drafts and prevents breakage. 

Morgan Putty forms a perfect non-chip, non-crack 
binder, uniting wood and glass into a complete unit. 



296 



^^f^^^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 




m 




Illustration of our 
Stock Check Rail 



M-1000 



M-1000 

2 Light Windows 1 %" Check Rail 
Carried in stock in the following sizes. 



Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


12x16 


18 x 20 


20x30 


24 X 18 


26 


x22 


28x20 


30x24 


34 X 26 


12 X 18 


18 X 24 


20x32 


24x20 


26 


x24 


28x22 


30x26 


34x28 


12x20 


18x26 




24x22 


26 


x26 


28x24 


30x28 






18x28 


22 X 16 


24x24 


26 


x28 


28x26 


30x30 


36x24 


14x20 


18x30 


22x18 


24x26 


26 


x30 


28x28 


30x32 


36x26 




18 x 32 


22x20 


24x28 


26 


x32 


28x30 


30 X 34 


36x28 


16x16 




22x22 


24x30 


26 


x34 


28x32 


30x36 


36 X 30 


16 X 18 


20 X 16 


22x24 


24x32 


26 


x36 


28x34 




36x32 


16x20 


20 X 18 


22 X 26 


24x34 






28x36 


32x24 




16x24 


20 X 20 


22x28 


24x36 


2714 


x24 




32 X 26 


40 X 24 


16x26 


20x22 


22x30 




ZIV, 


x28 


30x16 


32x28 


40x26 


16 X 28 


20x24 


22 X 32 


26 X 16 






30 X 18 


32x30 


40x28 




20x26 




26 X 18 


28 


xl6 


30x20 


32x32 


40x30 


18 X 16 


20x28 


24 X 16 


26x20 


28 


xl8 


30x22 


32 X 36 


40x32 


18x18 



















This Morgan Design can be built in other sizes. 



^^'"'^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





^ssssS 



M-lOOl 



M-1002 



M-lOOl 



Carried in 


5tock in tlie following sizes, 


1^/^ 


' check rail. 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


16 X 16 


20 X 20 


22x26 




26x20 


16 X 18 


20x22 


22x28 




26 X 24 


16x20 


20x24 






26x26 


16 X 24 


20x26 
20 X 28 


24x20 
24x24 




26x28 


18x18 




24x26 




28x24 


18x20 


22x20 


24x28 




28 X 26 


18x24 


22x24 






28x28 


18x26 











M-1002 

Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1%" check rail. 
Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass * 



20x20 
20 X 22 
20x24 
20x26 
20x28 

22x20 
22 X 24 
22x26 
22 X 28 



24 X 16 
24 X 18 
24 X 20 
24 x24 
24 X 26 
24 x28 

26 X 18 
26x20 
26 X 24 



26 X 26 
26x28 

28 X 20 
28x24 
28x26 
28x28 

30x20 
30x24 



30x26 
30 X 28 

32 x24 
32 x26 
32x28 

36 X 24 
36x26 
36 X 28 



Sizes wider than above, we advise use of Design M-1002 
to harmonize. 

Bottom Sash can be supplied divided hke top if desired. 



Sizes wider than above, we advise use of Design M-1006 
to harmonize. 

Bottom Sash can be supplied divided like top if desired. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^''' ^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





M-1003 



M-1004 





■ 1 




M-1003 


M-1004 






Carried in stock in the following sizes, l^s" check rail. 


Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 %" check rail. 






Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass 

16 X 16 20 X 24 24 X 28 30 x 20 
16 X 18 20 X 26 30 x 24 
16x20 20x28 26x20 30x26 
16 x 24 26 X 24 30 x 28 

22 X 20 26 x 26 
18 X 18 22 X 24 26 x 28 32 x 24 
18 X 20 22 X 26 32 x 26 
18x24 22x28 28x20 32x28 
18 X 26 28 x 24 

24 X 20 28 X 26 36 x 24 
20x20 24x24 28x28 36x26 
20 X 22 24 x 26 36 x 28 


Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass 
16 X 16 20 x 24 24 x 28 30 x 20 
16 X 18 20 X 26 30 x 24 
16x20 20x28 26x20 30x26 
16 X 24 26 X 24 30 x 28 

22 X 20 26 X 26 
18 X 18 22 X 24 26 x 28 32 x 24 
18 X 20 22 X 26 32 x 26 
18x24 22x28 28x20 32x28 
18 X 26 28 X 24 

24 X 20 28 X 26 36 x 24 
20x20 24x24 28x28 36x26 
20 X 22 24 X 26 36 x 28 






Layout^Height of upper row 8". 

Windows with glass 16" to 26" wide, 3 lights wide. 

Windows with glass 28" to 36" wide, 4 lights wide. 


Layout — Height of upper row 6". 
Windows with glass 16" to 20" wide, 3 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 22" to 26" wide, 4 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 28" to 32" wide, 5 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 36" wide, 6 lights wide. 






These Morgan Designs 


can be built in other sizes. 




^ 


■^ ^ 1 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





M-1005 



M-1006 













M-1005 


M-1006 




Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 H " check rail. 


Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1%" check rail. 






Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass 


Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass - 






16 X 16 20 X 24 24 x 28 30 x 20 
16 X 18 20 X 26 30 x 24 
16x20 20x28 26x20 30x26 
16x24 26x24 30x28 

22 X 20 26 x 26 
18 X 18 22 X 24 26 x 28 32 x 24 
18 X 20 22 X 26 32 x 26 
18x24 22x28 28x20 32x28 
18 X 26 28 X 24 

24 X 20 28 x 26 36 x 24 
20x20 24x24 28x28 36x26 
20 X 22 24 X 26 36 x 28 


16 X 16 20 X 24 24 x 28 30 x 20 
16 X 18 20 X 26 30 x 24 
16 X 20 20 X 28 26 x 20 30 x 26 
16 X 24 26 X 24 30 x 28 

22 X 20 26 X 26 
18 X 18 22 X 24 26 x 28 32 x 24 
18 X 20 22 X 26 32 x 26 
18x24 22x28 28x20 32x28 
18 X 26 28 X 24 

24 X 20 28 X 26 36 x 24 
20 X 20 24 X 24 28 x 28 36 x 26 
20 X 22 24 X 26 36 x 28 


y 




Windows with glass 16" to 20" wide, 3 lights wide. 

Windows with glass 22" to' 28" wide, 4 lights wide. 

Windows with glass 30" to 36" wide, 5 lights wide. 

Bottom Sash can be supplied divided like top if desired. 


Windows with glass 16" to 20" wide, 3 lights wide. 

Windows with glass 22" to 28" wide, 4 lights wide. 

Windows with glass 30" to 36" wide, 5 lights wide. 

Bottom Sash can be supplied divided like top if desired. 






These Morgan Designs 


can be built in other sizes. 
7nn 




... ..,. „ ,., -^ 


oUU ^ 





MORGAN STANDARDIZED WINDOWS 





^^E 



M-1007 



M-IOOS 



M-1007 



Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 ^i' check rail. 



M-1008 



Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


20 X 20 


22x26 


26 X 26 


30x24 


20 X 22 




26 X 28 


30x26 


20x24 


24x20 


26x30 


30x28 


20x26 


24 X 24 




30x30 




24x26 


28x24 




22x20 


24 X 28 


28x26 


32x28 


22 X 22 




28 X 28 


32x30 


22x24 


26x24 


28x30 





Carried in s 


tock in the folk 


awing sizes, 1 K 


' check rail. 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


20 X 18 


22 X 26 


26x20 


28x30 


20x20 


22x28 


26 X 24 




20x24 




26x26 


30 X 24 


20x26 


24x18 


26x28 


30 X 26 


20x28 


24x20 




30x28 




24 X 24 


28 X 24 


30x30 


22x20 


24x26 


28x26 




22x24 


24x28 


28x28 





Windows with glass sizes other than above divided to Layout — Corner lights 5" x 5". 
match. 

Bottom Sash can be supplied divided like top if desired. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^Jl^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





! 



M-1009 



M-lOlO 



M-1009 



M-lOlO 



Carried[in'stcck in the following sizes, 1 %' check rail. 
Size of Glass Size of Glass 



Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 3 g" check rail. 



24 


x24 


28 


x^6 


24 


x26 


28 


x^8 


24 


x28 


28 


xao 


24 


x30 






26 


x24 


30 


x26 


26 


X 26 


30 


x28 


26 


x28 


30 


x?fO 


26 


x30 







e of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


20 X 20 


24 X 28 


28 X 26 


20x22 




28 X 28 


20x24 


26x24 


28x30 


20x26 


26x26 






26x28 


30x24 


24x20 




30x26 


24 X 24 


28x24 


30x28 


24x26 




30x30 



Layout — Corner lights 5" x 5". 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^302 ^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





M-lOll 



M.1012 



M-1011 



M-1012 



Sizes that are appropriate for this design can 
be made promptly. We suggest for best effect 
that the top light of the window be square and 
not less than 20" x 20". 



Sizes that are appropriate for this design can 
be made promptly. We suggest for best effect 
that the top light of the window be square and 
not less than 24" x 24". 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all sizes. 



^ '''^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 




^bM 




M-1013 



M-1014 





^ 




M-1013 


M-1014 






Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 H' check rail. 


Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 H' check rail. 






Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass 


Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass - 






16 X 16 20 X 24 24 x 28 30 x 20 
16 X 18 20 X 26 30 x 24 
16x20 20x28 26x20 30x26 
16 X 24 26 X 24 30 x 28 

22 X 20 26 X 26 
18 X 18 22 X 24 26 x 28 32 x 24 
18 X 20 22 x 26 32 x 26 
18 X 24 22 X 28 28 x 20 32 x 28 
18 X 26 28 X 24 

24 X 20 28 X 26 36 x 24 
20 X 20 24 X 24 28 x 28 36 x 26 
20 X 22 24 X 26 36 x 28 


16 X 16 20 X 24 24 x 28 30 x 20 
16 X 18 20 X 26 30 x 24 
16 X 20 20 X 28 26 x 20 30 x 26 
16 X 24 26 X 24 30 x 28 

22 X 20 26 X 26 
18 X 18 22 X 24 26 x 28 32 x 24 
18 X 20 22 X 26 32 x 26 
18x24 22x28 28x20 32x28 
18 X 26 28 X 24 

24 X 20 28 X 26 36 x 24 
20 X 20 24 X 24 28 x 28 36 x 26 
20 X 22 24 X 26 36 x 28 






Windows with glass 16" to 20" wide, 3 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 22" to 28" wide, 4 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 30" to 36" wide, 5 lights wide. 


Windows with glass 16" to 20" wide, 3 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 22" to 28" wide, 4 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 30" to 36" wide, 5 lights wide. 






These Morgan Designs can 


be built in other sizes. 




1 -^^ bU4 


.^ . ,.. , . ,_l 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED WINDOWS 





M-1015 



M-1016 



M-1015 

Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 H' check rail. 



M-1016 

Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 ^ 



Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


16x16 


20x24 


24x28 


30 x 20 


16 X 18 


20x26 




30 X 24 


16x20 


20x28 


26x20 


30x26 


16x24 




26x24 


30x28 




22x20 


26x26 




18x18 


22x24 


26x28 


32x24 


18x20 


22x26 




32x26 


18x24 


22x28 


28x20 


32x28 


18x26 




28x24 






24x20 


28x26 


36 X 24 


20x20 


24x24 


28x28 


36 X 26 


20x22 


24x26 




36x28 



Size of Glass 

16 X 16 
16 X 18 
16x20 
16 X 24 

18 X 18 
18x20 
18 X 24 
18x26 

20x20 
20x22 



Size of Glass 

20 X 24 
20x26 
20x28 

22x20 
22x24 
22x26 
22x28 

24x20 
24x24 
24x26 



Size of Glass 
24x28 

26 X 20 
26x24 
26x26 
26x28 

28x20 
28x24 
28x26 
28x28 



' check rail. 

Size of Glass 
30x20 
30x24 
30 X 26 
30x28 

32x24 
32 X 26 

32x28 

36x24 
36x26 
36x28 



Windows with glass 16" to 20'' wide, 3 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 22" to 28" wide, 4 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 30" to 36" wide, 5 lights wide. 



Windows with glass 16" to 20" wide, 3 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 22" to 28" wide, 4 lights wide. 
Windows with glass 30" to 36" wide, 5 lights wide. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^^3Q5 ^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





Ro5§^ 



M-1017 



M-1018 





M-1017 




M-1018 


« 


Carried in 


stock in the following sizes, 1 % 


" check rail. Carried in 


stock in the following sizes, 1 f g 


" check rail. 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass ^ 


20 X 16 


22 X 26 


26x26 


30 X 26 20 X 16 


22x26 


26 X 26 


30x26 


20 X 18 


22x28 


26x28 


30 X 28 20 X 18 


22x28 


26x28 


30x28 


20x20 






20 X 20 








20x22 


24x20 


28 X 20 


32 X 24 20 X 22 


24x20 


28x20 


32x24 


20x24 


24x24 


28 X 24 


32 X 26 20 X 24 


24x24 


28x24 


32x26 


20x26 


24x26 


28x26 


32 X 28 20 X 26 


24x26 


28 x 26 


32x28 


20 X 28 


24x28 


28x28 


20 X 28 
36x24 


24x28 


28x28 


36x24 


22x20 


26x20 


30x20 


36 X 26 22 X 20 


26x20 


30 X 20 


36x26 


22x24 


26x24 


30x24 


36 X 28 22 X 24 


26 X 24 


30x24 


36x28 






These Morgan Designs can be built in other 


sizes. 






1 ^^ ^^^ A^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED WINDOWS 



I 





^og^ 



M-1029 



M-1030 



M-1029 



M-1030 



ock in the folk 


>wing sizes, IH' check rai 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Top Light 


Bottom Light 


36 X 16 


36 X 36 


40 X 16 


40 X 40 


40 X 16 


40x44 


44 X 16 


44x40 


44x16 


44x44 



Carried in sto^k in the following sizes, 1 %" check rail 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


Top Light 


Bottom Light 


36 X 16 
40 X 16 
40x16 
44 X 16 
44 X 16 


36 X 36 
40 X 40 
40 X 44 
44x40 
44 X 44 



Layout — Corner lights 5'' x 5" 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^ ^"^^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





M-1040 



M-1041 



M-1040 



M-1041 



Illustration shows top light glazed Leaded Double Strength, Illustrations hows top light glazed Leaded Bevel Plate, 

Metal Bars, Metal Bars. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes, l%" check rail. 

Size of Glass 

Top Light Bottom Light 

36 X 16 36 X 36 

40 X 16 40 X 40 

40 X 16 40 X 44 

44 X 16 44 X 40 

44 X 16 44 X 44 



Carried in stock in the following sizes, 1 W check rail. 

Size of Glass 

Top Light Bottom Light 

36 X 16 36 X 36 

40 X 16 40 X 40 

40 X 16 40 X 44 

44 X 16 44 X 40 

44 X 16 44 X 44 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



=^308 ^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



SASH 





gg^ 



M-1050 



M-1051 



M-1050 M-1051 


Carried in slock in the following sizes, 1 H" thick. Carried in stock in the 


following sizes, 1%" thick. 


Size of Glass Size of Glass | 


36 X 52 Top Light 
1? ? ^fi • 36 X 16 
la in 40x16 
44 X 60 40 ^ Ig 

44 X 16 
44 X 16 


Bottom Light 
36 X 36 
40x40 
40 X 44 
44 X 40 
44 X 44 


These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 


• 


' ^ 309 . 





^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED WINDOWS AND SASH 





M-1150 




M-1160 
M-1161 



Mce?^ 



M-llOO 



M-llOO 



4 Light Windows, 1 %" check rail. 



Carried in stock in the following sizes. 



Size of Glass Size of Glass Size of Glass 



M-1150 



2 Light Cellar Sash 1 %' thick. 

Carried in stock in the 
following sizes. 

Size of Glass Size of Glass 



10x20 
10x24 
10x26 
10x28 
10x30 
12x16 
12x18 
12x20 
12x22 
12 X 24 



x26 
x28 
x30 
x32 
x34 
x36 



13^x24 

13 H X 28 

14 x20 
14 X 24 



14 X 26 
14x28 
14x30 
14 x32 
14x34 
14x36 
15x28 
15x30 
15x32 



10 X 12 
10 X 14 
10 X 16 
12 X 12 
12 X 14 
12 X 16 
12 X 18 
12 X 20 



12 x24 
14 X 16 
14 X 18 
14 X 20 
14 X 24 
14 X 28 



M-1160 

3 Light 
Cellar Sash 
1 i/g' thick. 

Carried in stock 
in the following 
sizes. 
Size of Glass 
7x 9 
8x 10 
9x 12 
9x 14 
9x 16 
10 x 12 
10 X 14 
10 X 16 
12 X 14 
12 X 16 



M-1161 

3 Lieht 
Cellar Sa-th 
1 %' fchick. 

Carried in stock 
in the following 

sizes. 

Size of Glaa« 

10 X 12 

10 X 16 



Thete Morgan Designs can be built in other sixes. 



=^ 3^0;^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



WINDOWS 





BIHSa^ 



M.1200 
M-1250 



M-ISOO 
M-1350 



M.1200 



M-1250 



M-1300 



8 Light Windows 


8 Light Windows 


1 Vs" Plain Rail 


1 3/8' Check Rail 


Carried in stock in the 


Carried in stock in llie 


following sizes. 


following sizes. 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


8x10 


8x 10 


8 X 12 


10 X 12 


9x 12 


10 X 14 


10 X 12 


10 X 16 


10x14 


12 X 14 


10 X 16 


12x16 


12 X 14 


14x16 


12 X 16 


14 X 18 


12 X 18 


14 x20 



12 Light Windows 


1 Vs" Plain Rail 


Carried in stock in the 


following sizes. 


Size of Glass 


7x9 


8x10 


8x12 


8x14 


9x 12. 


9 X 14 


10 X 12 


10 X 14 


10 X 15 


10x16 


10 X 18 


12x14 



M-1350 

1 2 Light Windows 
1 %' Check Rail 

Carried in stock in the 
following sizes. 
Size of Glass 
8 X 10 
8x 12 
9x12 
10 X 12 
10 X 14 
10 X 16 
10 X 18 
12 X 14 
12 X 16 
12 X 18 
12 X 20 



These Morgan Designs ca/i be built in other sizes. 



^^"^ 



MORGAN 



STANDARDIZED 



CASEMENT 



SASH 




M-1400 





M-1401 



M.1402 



THE demand for Casement Sash varies so much in regard to sizes that it is 
impossible to carry a stock. We have constantly on hand a large quantity 
of knock-down material for these designs, or any other designs that may be 
desired, and can furnish them promptly. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all sizes. 



312 



=^''' ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED CASEMENT SASH 




M-1403 





m^ 



M-1404 



M-1405 



'T^HE demand for Casement Sash varies so much in regard to sizes that it is 
X impossible to carry a stock. We have constantly on hand a large quantity 
of knock-down material for these designs, or any other designs, and can furnish 
them promptly. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all sizes. 



"V. 313,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED SASH 





M.1425 



M-1426 



Designs M - 1425, M - 1426 and 
M-1428 are not used extensively; 
therefore, do not carry a stock made 
up. Can furnish promptly from knock- 
down material. 





M-1428 



M-1427 



1 Light Sash 1%' thick. 


Carried in stock in 


the following sizes 


Size of Glass 


Size of Glass 


16 X 16 


24 X 16 


16 X 18 


24x18 


16x20 


24x20 


16x24 


24x24 




24x28 


18 X 18 


24x30 


18x20 




18x24 


28x20 




28x24 


20 X 16 


28x28 


20 X 1? 




20x20 


30 X 16 


20 I 2-4 


30 X 18 




30x20 




30x24 




M-1440 



1 Light Transom 1 %' thick. 



Carried in stock in 


the following sizt-s. 


Size of Opening 


Size of Openina 


2-6 X 1-0 


2-10x1-2 


2-6 X 1-2 






3- 0x1-0 


2-8 X 1-0 


3- X 1-2 


2-8 X 1-2 


3- x 1-4 


2-8 X 1-4 


3- X 1-6 


2-8 X 1-6 


3- 0x1-8 




3-0x2-0 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



^■^"' ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED SASH 





^^^^1^^^"" '^""Tjp^ 1 ^ "^ 


■■■■■H 




M.1465 



M-1466 





M-1467 



M-1468 





M-1469 



M-1470 




M-1480 

Sash illustrated on this page are not used extensively; therefore, do not carry 

a stock made up. Can furnish promptly from knock-down 

material. 

These Mor/ian Designs can be built in all sizes. 



315 



^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED SASH 




M-1481 





M-1482 



M-1483 





M-1484 



M-1485 





M-1486 



M-1487 



Sash illustrated on this page are not used extensively; therefore, do not carry 

a stock made up. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all sizes. 



^^iii^ 



Dress Your Home in an "Overcoat" 



COAL is scarce and getting scarcer. As 
the supply goes down, the price goes up. 
Comfortable warmth is a luxury. It has be- 
come necessary to utilize every available means 
for conserving heat to ward off colds and com- 
bat the hazards of worse disorders. 

An * 'overcoat" of storm windows and storm 
doors affords the best cold weather protection. 
It keeps out the cold, yet permits free venti- 
lation without drafts. 

It saves enough coal in two or three seasons 
to cover the cost plus installation. This cost 
will 'be lowered by including the complete 
equipment in the original order. 

Combination Storm and Screen Door 

Changed With the Seasons as Easily 
as a Suit of Clothes 

Gone forever, in Morgan-equipped homes, 
is the old-time labor of taking down screen 





doors and putting 

up storm doors. 

Morgan makes one 

door to serve both 

purposes. 

The Morgan 

Combination 

Storm and Screen 

Door is hung by 

the carpenter 

when he hangs all 

the other doors — 

with the same skill 

and precision. It 

never comes down, 

summer or winter. 

So perfectly does 

it look and act 

that its dual role is not even suspected. 
It consists of a sturdy, permanent frame and 

two detachable panels^one of glass, the other 
of screen. All that is necessary for changing 

from one to the other is simply to turn four 
thumbscrews with the fingers — no tools required. 
They are fitted by experts at the factory. 

Compare this quick, easy and clean method 
with the heavy, bothersome, dirty job it sup- 
plants. After two or three changes by the old 
way the screws refuse to hold and the hinges 
must be changed to new positions. Soon the 
door frame is disfigured with many holes and 
cutouts for hinges, and presents a dilapidated 
appearance. Then, too, the dreaded operation 
is usually postponed until the early fly has been 
admitted, to propagate without hindrance, or a 
sudden cold spell makes it doubly disagreeable. 
There *s a wide range of styles to select from^ 
no fear of monotony or of duplicating other 
houses. Patterns 
that harmonize with 
regular doors are 
recommended. It 
is cheaper to buy 
and have them 
shipped all together. 
Order from your 
dealer by number. 
Furnished com- 
plete with buttons, 
putty-glazed sash 
and black japanned 
wire screen. If pearl 
or copper wire is 
preferred, we can 
supply it at slight 
additional cost. 



M-1500 





^^^^^^^^•^^Jj^Lf^'iF"^ 
























■ 

































The Combination Storm and Screen Door illustrated is carried in stock in standard sizes. 
This Morgan Design can be built in any size 



^^iiL^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED COMBINATION DOORS 





M-1501 




M-1504 



i 'It 




^1 



M-1502 





jp—*.^ 




M-1505 

The Combination Storm and Screen Doors illustrated are carried in 
stock in standard sizes. 

These Morgan Designs can be built in any size. 



318 



M-1506 



^±1^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED STORM SASH 

1^ 






M-1510 



M-1511 



M-1512 








iifi^^^^z 



^ 



1 




M-1513 



M-1514 



M.1515 



M-1516 



The Storm Sash illustrated carried in stock in all 
standard sizes. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in any size. 



319 



^iil^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED BLINDS AND SHUTTERS 




Outside Blinds are extensively 
used in many localities and the 
requirements vary to such an 
extent that it is impossible to 
state here just which sizes are 
carried in stock at our various 
warehouses. The requirements 
are for: 

All Rolling Slats, 
Half Rolling and Half Sta- 
tionary Slats, 
All Stationary Slats, 
both 13^ and 1% inches thick. 



M-1600 





M-1601 

















' 








^ 




■ 
















J 




















? 

J 



M-1602 



These Morgan Designs can be built in any size. 



"^^ 320 ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED BLINDS AND SHUTTERS 



M-1603 



wmm 


«■ 


' — ■""■" ■"---! 





Shutters are in demand and 
their use is increasing. As with 
Outside Blinds, we cannot give 
a Ust here of styles and sizes 
carried in stock at our various 
distributing points. They are 
13^ and 1^8 inches thick. Spe- 
cial designs of vents or cut-outs 
can be had. 





M-1604 



M-1605 

These Morgan Designs can be built in any size. 



321 



-^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED STAIR WORK 






M-1718 
Stair Bracket 



M-1700 



M-1701 




M-1702 



M-1719 

Stair Bracket 





M-1725 



M-1726 




M-1727 



M-1700 

Paneled Face String 
consists of: 

A Fillet 

B Shoe 

C Stile 

D Panel 

E Ceiling Casing 



M-1701 

Paneled Face String 
consists of: 

A Fillet 

B Shoe 

C Moulding 

D Stile 

E Panel 

F Ceiling Casing 



M-1702 

Stair Section 
consists of: 

A Base Mould 

B Wall String 

C Riser 

D Tread 

E Nosing 



M-1725- 

Starting Step built to 
match Rise and Run. 

M-1726 

Starting Step built to 
match Rise and Run. 

M-1727 
Starting Step built to 
match Rise and Run. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods. 



322 



'^ ^^ 



MORGAN Sl^ANDARDIZED STAIR NEWELS 



M-1740 

Stock size 
6" X 6", 4-0 

Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1741 

Stock size 
6" X 6'\ 4-0 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 

Yellow Pine 



M-1742 

Stock size 
5" X 5", 4-0 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 
Yellow Pine 



M-1743 

Stock size 
6" X 6", 4-0 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 
Yellow Pine 



M-1740 shown in stair design M-207, on page 76. 
M-1741 shown in stair design M-203. on page 72. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and s/zes. 



^^_323^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED STAIR NEWELS 





M-1744 


M-1745 


M-1746 


M-1747 


M-1748 


Size 


Stock size 


Size 


Stock size 


Size 


4^" X 41^" 


7" X 7", 4-0 


6" X 6^ 4-6 


6' X 6'^ 4-0 


8" X 8", 4-0 


Built to order 


Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 


Built to order 


Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 


Built to order 



M-1744 shown in stair design M-201, on page 70. 
M-1745 shown in stair design M-208, on page 77. 
M-1747 shown in stair design M-202, on page 71. 
M-1748 shown in stair design M-205, on page 74. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods and sizes. 



324 



"^^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED STAIR NEWELS 



; 




M-1755 

Stock size 
5" X 5", 5-6 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 
Yellow Pine 



M-1756 

Stock size 
5" X 5", 5-6 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 
Yellow Pine 



M-1757 

Size 

5" X 5", 5-6 

Built to order 



M-1758 

Stock size 
5" X 5", 5-6 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 
Yellow Pine 



M-1759 

Stock size 
5" X 5", 5-6 

Plain Red Oak 
Birch 
Yellow Pine 



M-1756 shown in stair design M-207, on page 76. 

M-1758 shown in stair designs M-203 and M-208, on pages 72 and 77. 

M-1759 shown in stair designs M-202 and M-209, on pages 71 and 78. 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other woods and sizes. 



325 



=W ^^ J^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED STAIR RAIL AND BALUSTERS 




M-1765 

Size 

Built to order 




M-1768 

Size 

Bmlt to order 




M-1766 

Stock size 
2y8" X 3" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 




M-1770 

Size 

Built to order 




M-1767 

Stock size 
2ys'' X 3*^ 

Plain Red Oak 

Birch 

Yellow Pine 




M-1772 

Stock size 

Plain Red Oak 

Yellow Pine 



M-1773 

Stock size 
H" X 2H" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1774 

Stock size 
M" X IW 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1780 

Stock sizes 

Ws" X 28" 
1^" X 32" 

Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1781 

Stock size 
IVs" X 1^" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1782 

Stock size 
iVs" X 13^" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1775 

Stock size 
W X 1^" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1783 

Stock size 
13^"x32" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1784 

Stock size 
lM"x32" 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1776 

Stock size 
K"xlH^ 
Plain Red Oak 
Yellow Pine 



M-1785 

Size 
W X 3" 
Built to order 



These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods and sizes. 



326 



^^^°^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED CEILING BEAMS 




M-1790 

Width including Moulding 7J4", 
Drop 3%". 




3^ 



M-1792 

Width including Moulding 6'^ Drop 




M.1791 

Width including Moulding 73^", 
Drop 3y2\ 




M-1793 

Width including Moulding 7}4'\ 
Drop 3M\ 




M-1794 

Width including Moulding 6^", 
Drop 3". 




M-1798 

Base Block 
Stock sizes. 

S^^x 9% %' 
4M''xlOMH' 
Plain Red Oak 
Gum 
Yellow Pine 




M-1795 

Width including Moulding 6}i\ 
Drop 2M". 




M-1796 

Width including Moulding 4M" 
Drop M"- 



M-1799 

Base Block 

Sizes 
3K'x 9% %' 
4H'x 10', IH' 

Made to order. 




M-1798 M-1799 

These Morgan Designs can be built in all woods and sizes. 



=^''^' ^ 



MORGAN DOOR AND WINDOW FRAMES 



u y 



If^'fW 



Mil '^ 
u 




M-1800 



M-1801 



M-1802 



M-1803 



M-1804 



M-1805 



k-JU yi aof 






M-1806 M-1807 



M-1800 
M-1801 
M-1802 
M-1803 
M-1804 
M-1805 
M-1806 
M-1807 
M-1808 
M-1809 
M-1810 
M-1811 



M-1808 



M-1809 



M-1810 



M-1811 



Window Frame. Plain Drip Cap for 2 x 4 studs, 1 piece sill. 
Door Frame. Plain Drip Cap for 2 x 4 studs. 
Window Frame. Crown Mould Cap for 2 x 4 studs. 
Door Frame. Crown Mould Cap for 2 x 4 studs. 
Casement Sash Frame. Crown Mould Cap for 2 x 4 studs. 
Window Frame. Plain Drip Cap for 2 x 4 studs, 2 piece sill. 
Window Frame for a Stucco Building, 2x4 studs. 
Door Frame for a Stucco Building, 2x4 studs. 
Casement Sash Frame for a Stucco Building, 2x4 studs. 
Window Frame for a Brick Veneer Building, 2x4 studs. 
Door Frame for a Brick Veneer Building, 2x4 studs. 
Casement Sash Frame for a Brick Veneer Building, 2x4 studs. 



( 



Frames can be built in all designs and sizes. 



^'''^ 



MORGAN DOOR AND WINDOW FRAMES 









M-1813 



M-1814 



M-1815 



M-1816 





M-1817 



M-1818 M-1819 M-1820 



M-1812 Box Window Frame, 8" wall, brick arch. 

M-1813 Box Window Frame, 8" wall, stone cap. 

M-1814 Box Window Frame, 12" wall, brick arch. 

M-1815 Box Window Frame, 12" wall, stone cap. 

M-1816 Plank Door Frame, 8" face, brick arch. 

M-1817 Plank Door Frame, 8" wall, stone cap. 

M-1818 Plank Door Frame, 12" wall, brick arch. 

M-1819 Plank Door Frame, 12" stone cap. 

M-1820 Casement Sash Frame, 8" wall, stone cap. 

M-1821 Cellar Sash Frame, 8" wall. 



Door and window frames are detailed to suit each locality. The above 
illustrations show some of the many designs for brick, stone, and brick 
veneer buildings, as well as for buildings made with the outside stucco or 
entirely of wood. The requirements vary so much that it is impossible to 
state here just which sizes and designs are carried in stock at our various 
warehouses. 

In making frames, care should be taken that they are so constructed 
that the elements will be excluded. 



Frames can be built in all designs and sizes. 



M-1821 



^^^f^ 



MORGAN GABLE OPENINGS 




M-1831 




M-1830 




M-1833 




M-1836 



These Morgan Designs built in all sizes. 




M-1832 




M-1835 



% 



=^330^,^^= 



MORGAN FLOWER BOXES 



These illustrations are to con- 
vey an idea of the beautiful 
effects which can be obtained by 
using inexpensive flower boxes 
for exterior decoration, in con- 
nection with our stock windows. 



These Morgan Designs can be built 
in all sizes. 




M-1848 



M-1849 



-^^ >j^i .^.^^= 



MORGAN 



DORMERS 




M-1876 



In most all homes valuable 
space can be utilized by the use 
of the dormer window, but care 
should be taken in the selection of 
the design. It should conform 
in style to the balance of the 




M-1877 



=^ '''^ 



332 



MORGAN 



DORMERS 




home or it will appear awkward 
and out of place. The ones 
shown on these pages have 
been designed to harmonize 
with distinct architectural treat- 
ments. 



M-1880 



=^^^^\>^ 



The Porch That Accords With 

the House 



T3ESIDES being useful during the day time, 
^^ the porch may be utilized for sleeping by 
placing a sanitary cot, or couch of any kind, in 
some convenient place. The benefits of sleeping 
in the open air — improved health, vitality, re- 
freshed feeling in the morning — are so well known 
that only passing comment is necessary. 

New woodwork patterns suggest a large variety 
of effective combinations. Look over the follow- 
ing pages for interesting examples of approved 
porch architecture. 

No other single feature of home planning gives 
such broad scope to the expression of individuality 
as the porch and entrance. Their prominence 
entitles them to special consideration. Modern 
porches, taken collectively, show a decided im- 
provement over those of a generation ago. Porches 
today are built to serve a definite purpose, and 
to serve it well. 



334 



^'''^ 



M 



O R 



N 



O R 



H 




M-2000 

n^HIS porch is of simple but artistic design. With the 
^ brick balustrade and square column, it affords an excep- 
tionally good opporunity for screens, or sash, or both if desired. 



335 



^ """ ^ 



M 



R 



N 



R 



C 



H 







\h\n\\f I • 



:y<'^rj. "i . 'i u,^ 



ih'.i>,\i,..^nv !. 






M-2001 

n^HIS unique porch is built by using our stock Column 
^ M-2015, shown on page 341. Note the special design 
of balustrade which is built with Baluster M-2038, Top Rail 
M-2032, Bottom Rail M-2033, all shown on page 342. 



336 



X"-^"^ 



M O R 



A N 



R 



H 




fv\n*'jti%s''^ .-'l^i^^ii'i'Vi; 



Ri^M^^] 



M-2002 



n^ HE porch illustrated is designed with the combination 
^ corner post and trellis work between the columns. The 
stock patterns used are Column M-2012, shown on page 341, 
Trellis M-2039, shown on page 342. 



337 



^''^ ^ 



M R 



N 



R 



H 




m 



^\\\\ .IV ')t\ \\>t=?i-, • I ,a,i,ll!if--:t 



'Mi 

■.ill 




M-2003 

'T^HIS illustration shows an attractive porch built with 
J- stock Column M-2010, shown on page 341, Note the 
beauty of the treUis, made of M-8614, shown on page 380, 
at each side — just enough to complete the design. 



338 



^^^^^ ^ 



M O 



R 



N 



O 



C H 




M-2004 

TTERE is shown a porch enclosed with sash. This feature 
^ J- is very popular and affords comfort and pleasure in cool 
weather, as well as in the summer months when screens are 
used. 



339 



^^^^^^ 



M 



R 






N 



O R 



H 







. .«.»«ii«MiiirilHHHIiiHH'^ 



M-2005 

THIS porch is very serviceable in that it is extremely 
wide and long. The design is plain, yet most attractive. 



f'" 



^''^^-^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED PORCH COLUMNS 



M-2010 

Stock sizes. 

6' 6'0* 

S'O" 

9'0" 



8' 



10' 



6'0^ 
8Mr 

6'0" 

8'0" 
B'O' 

6'0" 
8'()" 
9'0" 




M-2011 



M-2012 





M-2015 



Stock sizes. 


Stock sizes. 


Stock sizes. 


6" 


G'O" 
8'0" 
g'O" 


6"x 6" 
8" X 8" 


6'0" 
B'O" 

e'O" 


8" X 8' 6' 
8' 0' 
9'0" 


8' 


6'0" 
8'0" 
9^0" 


10" x 10' 


8'0" 
9'0" 

6'0" 


10" X 10" 6' 0' 
8'0" 
9'0' 


10" 


6'0" 
8'0" 
9'0" 




8'0* 
9'0' 


12" X 12" 6' 0" 
8'0" 
9'0' 


12" 


6^0" 
8'0" 
9'0" 










Showing 
Construction of 
M-2010 
M-201 1 
M-2020 



M-2020 

Stock sizes. 
6" 4' 0" 




M-2025 

Stock sizes. 
8" X 8" 4' 0" 



8" 4' 0" 
These Morgan Designs can be aailt in other sizes 



fr 



Showing 

Construction of 

M-2015 

M-2025 



^^41 A^ 



MORGAN STANDA RID IZED PORCH WORK 





M-2030 

Stock size 



M-2031 

Stock size 




M-2032 

Stock size 



M-2033 

Stock size 



M-2034 

Stock size 
2H''xlW 




M-2035 

Stock size 
2M"x2K' 



M-2036 

Stock sizes 
IM'xl^', 20' 



Stock sizes 
M-2037 IK'xlK' 
M-2038 IVs^xiys' 
M-2039 IH'xlH' 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



=^^42 ^^ 



MORGAN RAFTER ENDS AND BRACKETS 





These Morgan Designs built in all sizes. 



^^""•^ ;^ 



Garages of Distinction 



MOST of us are apt to pass altogether too 
lightly over the selection and design of our 
garage. We think of it merely as a place in which 
to keep a car and not as a part of our home. This 
is the reason why we find so many home sites 
marred by the presence of an ordinary-looking, 
if not a downright ugly garage. But every chapter 
of this book has preached the advantages of 
choosing every part of the interior and exterior 
of our home carefully, so that it will be a dis- 
tinctive place, harmonized throughout. Would 
it not then be a mistake to erect '*any old garage'' 
to accompany the home we have built so pains- 
takingly? And as in all other items of building, 
a distinctive, appropriate garage will cost you 
no more than an inappropriate one. It need 
not be large or fancy. But it should be neat 
and substantial — adding to rather than de- 
tracting from the beauty of the homesite. Four 
patterns which measure up to those specifications 
are shown on the two succeeding pages. 



MORGAN GARAGES 




M-2100 

Doors shown are our design M-2151, page 347 










M-2101 
Doors shown are our design M-2153, page 347 



^•^"' -^ 



MORGAN GARAGES 




M-2102 
Doors shown are our design M-2150, page 347 







M-2103 
Doors shown are our design M-2152, page 347 



346 



^^^40^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED GARAGE DOORS 



rrT?^ 




M-2150 

Carried in stock in the following sizes. 
Single Door 4-0 x 8-0, 1 %' 
Pair of Doors 8-0 x 8-0, 1 %' 



I 



mm 



mm 



Mil 



lilil 



1 



\ 




M-2151 

Carried in stock in the following si 
Single Door 4-0 x 8-0. 1 %" 
Pair of Doors 8-0 x 8-0. 1 ^' 




n 



n 




M-2152 

Carried in stock in the following sizes. 
Single Door 2-8 x 8-0. 1 %' 
Set of Doors 8-0 x 8-0, 1 %' 







M-2153 

Carried in stock in the following si 
Single Door 2-B x 8-0, 1 %' 
Set of Doors 8-0 x 8-0, 1 H" 



These Morgan Designs can be built in other sizes. 



347 



^^"^^ 



Landscape Suggestions for Small 
Houses and City Back Yards 

Prepared by the Garden Service Department of 
*'The Touchstone Magazine*' 



A HOUSE is never quite complete without a 
garden about it. So thoroughly do many 
architects realize this that they insist on laying 
out the garden as well as the house plan. 
They know that a garden enhances or mars 
the final effect of their house. They know also 
that it is of the greatest importance that the 
house be placed to the best advantage on tHe 
lot. A home garden is usually divided into 
lawn, flower and vegetable gardens, and service 
yard. The flower garden should be laid out 
so that it may be enjoyed from the windows 
of the house; the vegetable garden at the back, 
and the two separated either by flowering 
hedges or a lattice fence over which vines can 
grow. 

Lawns add dignity to a house and should 
never be cut up with small flower beds. Flowers 
should be arranged in borders about the outer 
edges of the lawns, walks, and foundations of 
the houses. Every garden should include 
hardy shrubs and plants, and should be fur- 
nished with seats, arches for vines and some 
simple ornament like sun-dial or bird-house. 
There should be a formal arrangement of walks, 
hedges, etc., but this primness can be softened 
by placing flowers at the corners and along 
walks, to break the positive direction of line. 

All gardens should be laid out with design, 
for this increases an impression of space. The 
lot here shown (Plan No. 1) is the average lot, 
one hundred feet front by one hundred and 
fifty feet deep. The house is set back twenty- 
five feet from the street. The driveway leads 
straight to the garage, curving only in front 
of the door to permit turning the car. In the 
center of this space could be a sun-dial or a 
bird-bath surrounded with flowers. This 
would make a beautiful picture from the street 
and would serve as a screen to the open garage 
doors. There is room at the back of the garage 
so that direct access is had to the vegetable 



plot. This makes it very convenient for the 
carrying in of fertilizer and the bringing out 
of vegetables and fruits. The vegetable plot 
is thirty by fifty feet, and if more space is 
needed, the plot devoted to flowers for cutting 
can be utilized. 

The garden is laid out to form a vista of 
beauty from the sun porch. There is a view 
of an arched gateway covered with vines, lead- 
ing to the vegetable garden. A drying yard 
is close to the kitchen door and the play yard 
for the children is just back of it. The two 
are separated by a hedge of flowering shrubs, 
roses, althea or Cahfornia privet. Back of 
the two seats should be flowers, a stand of 
tall lilies behind one and hollyhocks behind 
the other. About the base of the house should 
be evergreens for winter color. 






UEGETABU3 




Plan No. 1 



^<Jli^ 




aSl ^^if^^ 



Plan No. 2 

Plan No. 2 is for a small bungalow to be 
built upon a lot almost square. The problem 
in this case was to place the house in such a 
way as to secure the largest amount of garden 
space. If the house were placed in the center 
of the lot, there would be comparatively no 
room for a garden. But by placing it at the 
extreme end of the lot, as near the front as 
city ordinance will permit, and by making 
the pergola-porch a diagonal one, quite a vista 
has been obtained. 

In designing this house, the thought was to 
gain a beautiful view across the garden imme- 
diately upon entering the house. Groups of 
windows and a wide glass door give an almost 
uninterrupted view of the garden from the 
dining room and living room. Whether enter- 
ing from the front door, sitting in the living 
room or out on the porch, the fullest pos- 
sible view of the garden can be obtained. 

Pictures from several angles have 
been planned in this garden. The first 
one, from the pergola-porch, is di- 
rectly along a flower-bordered path- 
way, across a sun-dial or bird-bath 
to a corner pergola (which serves as a 
garden room) wreathed with vines. A 
hedge of roses, althea, or some other 
flowering shrub separates this lot from 
its neighbor. In front of the hedge is 
a border of hardy annuals. To give the 



garden an appearance of importance, it has 
been raised three steps above the front lawn. 
Those steps are of grass, just like the lawn — 
a delightful, picturesque way of separating the 
two gardens. 

There is a herb garden near the kitchen door, 
where parsley, mint, summer savory, etc., are 
grown. The drying yard is close to the kitchen 
porch and back of it is the vegetable plot. 
A lattice fence separates the vegetable from 
the flower garden, against which espalier trees 
should be planted. The paths could be of 
flags, set far enough apart to allow grass or 
sweet-smelling, low-growing plants to live, or 
they could be of pebbles. 

In this garden, the feature is a wall fountain 
of colored tile and a grouping of Lombardy 
poplar or cedar trees, in such a way that they 
make a half segment or circle. In front of 
this is a small pool. A stepping stone path 
connects with the end of the brick walk around 
the pool to the pergola. In the center of the 
entire garden is a sun-dial. Paths leading to 
it are of stepping stones. An archway across 
the path gives beauty and ornamental trees 
in tubs are at the end of the stairway leading 
down to the garden. Flowers and vines grow 
in the borders at the two ends. 

While the foregoing plans are merely sugges- 
tions which may be adapted to conform to 
almost any location or site, the general prin- 
ciples outlined in them are correct and should 
be followed as closely as conditions will permit. 




^^ffi^ 




^=V.350 ,^ 



MORGAN PERGOLAS 





w 




' "^ . 












M-2201 

Column used in above design is M-2015, shown on page 341 




M-2202 

Column used in above design is M-2010, shown on page 341 

These Morgan Designs can be built in all sizes 



^^Vs. 



351 



MORGAN FENCES 






^^'^ 



or*'?' 




M-2210 




M-2211 




M-2212 

These Morgan Designs built in all sizes 



352 



^ 



MORGAN FENCES 




M-2213 




M-2214 





M-2225 



M-2226 



These Morgan Designs built in all sizes 



353 



^■^"•^ ^ 



How to Choose the Wood for 
Your Floors 

Through the Courtesy of the Oak Flooring Manufacturers Association 



THERE are almost as many kinds of wood 
floors as there are woods, nearly every 
commercial lumber being used for flooring in 
some localities or under some circumstances. 
Each wood, however, has its own merits, and 
everyone who is building or remodeling a home 
or other building should know the valuable 
qualities of the principal flooring woods. 

Wood floors are divided into two principal 
classes^soft-wood floors and hard- wood floors. 
In home building nowadays, the use of soft-wood 
is wholly confined to attics or other rooms of 
occasional or unimportant use, since the manu- 
facture of modern hard-wood flooring has been 
developed to the point where its cost is so 
little more than that of soft-wood and its 
durability so much greater — to say nothing 
of appearance — that the soft-wood is not true 
economy. 

Among the soft woods, Tupelo and Southern 
Pine probably make the best floors. Tupelo is 
really near or upon the line between soft and 
hard wood. Its floor is a beautiful, clear white, 
which may be finished in many ways with 
stain, varnish and wax, just as the hard woods 
may. Tupelo has what is known as * 'involved 
grain"— that is to say, the fibres of the wood 
are interwoven in such a way as to make it 
extremely tough and durable, although it is 
not extremely hard. Tupelo should not be 
used for porch or any other outside flooring. 

The hard woods chiefly used for interior 
flooring are Oak, Birch, Maple and Beech. 
Oak is easily the leader among these and is 
generally regarded as the standard wood floor- 
ing for all residential purposes. Oak flooring 
may be had quarter-sawed or plain-sawed, in 
red or white oak, and in several grades. The 
standard thicknesses as adopted by the Hard- 
wood Flooring Manufacturers' Associations, 
are thirteen-sixteeths of an inch and three- 



eighths of an inch, and widths run from one and 
one-half inches upward. 

Flooring is a specially manufactured prod- 
uct, and not merely a series of narrow boards. 
It is tongued on one side, grooved on the other, 
and similarly treated at the ends (see ijlustra- 
tions on page 356), and the forms of tongues 
and grooves, as well as other parts of the 
flooring strips, have been worked out through 
scientific experiment and experience, so that 
when properly laid, any good hardwood floor 
makes a surface of practical perfection, without 
a crack or nail-head showing in it anywhere. 

There is little, if any, choice between Red 
Oak and White Oak, and as between the 
quarter-sawed and plain-sawed, the choice is 
perhaps usually determined by price. Quarter- 
sawed Oak flooring costs somewhat more than 
the plain-sawed, yet many prefer the plain, 
regardless of price. 

Most of the hard-wood floorings are made 
in the thickness of three-eighths of an inch, 
for the convenience of those who are renovating 
old homes rather than building new ones. If 
an old floor is reasonably true and level, no 
matter what wood it may be made of, three- 
eighths inch hardwood flooring may be nailed 
down on top of it, with a result quite as good 
as that obtained from building an entirely new 
floor, and the cost of the improvement is 
astonishingly small. 

Birch, which is well known as a fine cabinet 
and veneer wood, is also made into excellent 
flooring. It has a beautiful grain of its own 
and a warm, slightly reddish tone, which 
makes it especially attractive with Birch or 
Mahoganized trim and doors. Birch is ex- 
tremely hard and durable and resists dents 
and scratches as well as any wood in common 
use. 



^^354^5^ 



In the quantity used for flooring, Maple 
probably stands next to Oak. Maple is 
another extremely hard wood and is therefore 
in great demand for floors upon which traffic 
is heavy, such as school-rooms, offices, fac- 
tories, etc. Maple has nevertheless a bright, 
nearly white color, which is susceptible to any 
treatment in stain and varnish, and many 
houses are completely floored with Maple by 
people who prefer it to other woods. A special 
use of Maple Flooring in homes is for kitchen 
floors, where its resistance to hard usage makes 
it desirable and where its very close grain 
prevents its deep absorption of grease or other 
cooking materials which may be spilled upon 
it. Maple withstands scrubbing indefinitely 
and, speaking generally, has but one strong 
competitor for its qualities, and that is Birch. 

Beech also makes an excellent floor, but its 
use for flooring is more or less local. It is 
hard and durable, takes a good finish, and in 
grain somewhat resembles both plain-sawed 
Oak and Birch. 

The laying and preparing for finish of any 
floor has a great deal to do with the general 
appearance and durability. To obtain the 
best results all floors should be laid at right 
angles with the sub or under floor. After the 
floor is properly laid it should be scraped and 
sanded. Always scrape and sand lengthwise 
of the wood and not across the grain. 

The finishing of flooring is a very important 
feature upon which authorities fail to agree, but 
the matter resolves itself into one of cost as 
well as to the color and brilliancy of the finish 
desired. Personal taste, artistic or decorative 
effects should be the guide. 

Where high-class finish is desired Oak 
Flooring should always be treated with a paste 



filler to fill up the pores and crevices. It forms 
a smooth level foundation, which is the key- 
note for successful treatment of floors. After 
the filler, a wax finish can be used. Wax 
finish is preferred by many, due to economy 
and ease in removing scratches or renewing. 
Varnish finish is usually more expensive than 
the wax and gives a hard surface, yist at the 
same time is sufficiently elastic. Two or three 
coats of either wax or varnish should be applied 
after the application of a paste filler. Any of 
the Standard Hardwood Flooring Finishes 
give good results. 

For Maple, Birch, Beech and other close- 
grained flooring, when a high-class finish is 
wanted, we recommend a liquid filler, followed 
by a wax or varnish finish, as above described 
for Oak flooring. 

Where a high-class finish is not desired a 
very economical finish can be had by the use 
of a light flooring oil, which is made expressly 
for this purpose by many paint and varnish 
manufacturers. It serves as a filler as well 
as a finish and is recommended for any hard- 
wood flooring in public buildings, stores, 
kitchens, bathrooms, etc. This oil keeps the 
dust from forming and preserves the floor. 

Floors are important parts of a house, inas- 
much as they have to withstand real mechan- 
ical wear, which no other parts of the building, 
except the windows and doors, must with- 
stand to any great extent. The home-builder, 
who wishes to have his house complete and 
permanently satisfactory, will do well to give 
the question of flooring the attention which its 
importance justifies. The difference in price 
between the very poorest and the very best 
floors is so small in a house of any ordinary 
dimensions that the general rule of wisdom is: 
"The Best is None Too Good." 



^^ 



355 



^ 




Illustration shows Plain Red Oak 




Illustration shows Quartered White Oak 




Illustration shows Clear Maple 




Illustration shows Birch 



356 



^ 



Art Glass in the Home 



npHE staining of glass and leading it into in- 
- tricate and pleasing designs was one of the 
earliest mediums for the expression of art. It 
reached its height early in the sixteenth century 
when a satisfactory process of coloring glass was 
discovered. Prior to this the colored effect was 
attained by painting the glass. One needs only to 
visit the historic chapels and cathedrals of Europe 
to realize the wonderful effects which can be at- 
tained with colored glass. There is scarcely a 
home which does not have some window or door 
which would be rendered much more attractive 
by the use of well chosen stained glass. It is well 
to bear in mind that the most pleasing effects will 
be obtained if the colored glass is placed on the 
light side of a room where there is the least amount 
of light thrown on it from the inside. And re- 
member that the making of harmonious designs is 
a craft, a science and an art. We leave it to your 
judgment whether or not the following Morgan 
designs bear the stamp of artistry. 



^.JfL^ 



MORGAN ART GLASS 




M-3000 









^ 




^ 


m i*v'* 




J 


r^^«. 


HgHs 


r^wA^VnVJ^H 


3 


A 




B 




M-3002 



M-3001 



The designs illustrated on this page 
are intended for Mullions or Pairs of 
Sash, but any light shown can be made 
for a Single Sash if desired. If single 
lights are ordered, give the designating 
letter as well as the design number. 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



V.^58 ^^ 



MORGAN ART GLASS 




n 



M-3010 



M-3011 





-^ 


k,^ 


^ 


-^ 


L«^ 


1 


h 


ri 


fi 


n 


F 


li 


J 


- — 4 


^ 


\ 


J 






» 




i 


\, 



M-3013 



T"*^""-'^^ 



"r~^"^^^-r-""^" 



\'^ 



^^'^'^ 



M-3014 




M.3015 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



M-3012 



=^ 359 A^ 



MORGAN ART GLASS 




3 






1. 



M-3016 



tf — "Mf 



M-3019 




M-3017 




«^ 



^ 



M-3018 



-i 


^ T 




''A 






-*- 


— L- 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



M-3020 



360 






MORGAN ART GLASS 



-T 


i 






1 


_i 



M-3021 



■■ 


BH 


■■ 


■■ 


■^^/llsT/sH 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Hi 


ill 





"" 


■ 1 






1 


1 






i... ^ 








1 


in 

J 






K 








s 

* 




















1 


1 



M-3022 



Jl 



M-3023 



^ 


r 
If 


i 





M-3024 



M-3025 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



^^\^ 361 j^j^ 



MORGAN ART GLASS 



--/- r \~- 

«— . ..I ll ■i . . «»r , r»-^ *»»w. 





\ 



\ 



\ 



II 



I 




J, 


r 


\ 


'I 

J 


• 


■ / 









M-3026 



M-3027 





rx ^ 


1 

V 






i 

1 ' 














*T'1«3 



^1 



M-3028 



B A 

These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



M-3029 



362 



^^"^^ 



MORGAN ART GLASS 



<k^^ 



u 



M-3040 



M-3041 



7jQ^ 



I) 




M-3042 



7^ 


fl 


J 


I^j-p-l 



M-3043 



M-3044 



M-3045 




^..^' 



^ 



i 



M-3046 



-O- 



M-3047 




-Xib. 



5F 



,ZX 



w 



A. 





/CS 1 






/y- 


-y\ 




ZI "" 


„L. 


J 


t 


J.. 


pL. 






\ fe 


rf ir 










V. 
























1 



M-3048 



M-3049 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



1 




^:y^^^^'P 




1 



M-3050 



^^^^ ^ 



MORGAN ART GLASS 




^ 



/ 



to 

o 

CO 



















'^^^E 




mP^ 

















o 
o 

CO 













^ J 






( 


W -'^''iiiinm 


\ 


wmmmi;i:--\ 








^TIIM. j 














o 

CO 
































M 










B^^Si^ 




^ 

































00 

o 

CO 

i 



1 






/^W^ 






w^m^^k'^v^^m^. 


s^m:=i 

















































1 









O 
CO, 



J 






1 


J 






L 














^^^^pl^^ 










H 






1 


1 






r 



. I_i«^ ^^_^^^ 



in 
o 

CO 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



^jfi^ 



. 



MORGAN ART GLASS 



,J=^T 


it= 


'r^ 






CO 

o 

CO 



Ji 










iiPRa 
















^ 


? 






P=^=^ 


2 










€444^ 




— 









I 4 I I 





as 
o 

CO 



s 



^Ofe^ 




o 

CO 



r 



> 



M 



o 

CO 




nw 









00 

o 

CO 



"W 



^ 



ml 



o 

CO 




These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



365 



^£^.^ i£ 



MORGAN LEADED DOUBLE STRENGTH GLASS 



^ 

^ 
2 





00 

o 

CO 



m 




\m 





00 

o 

CO 



m 



00 

o 

CO 




00 

o 

CO 











^^^^" 


^ 




S| 






y 






^1 — 1 


^ 








/L-^ 


? 












s 


_ 













00 
00 

o 

CO 




LO 

oo 
o 

CO 




m 



m 



1 




o 

CO 




1 








J 


s 






? 




kr— 




f— 




? 


s 






y 











CO 
00 

o 

CO 



These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



366 



^ 



MORGAN LEADED BEVEL PLATE GLASS 





riferll 



o 

CO 



i^ m^ll^smk. . I '^i^^J^. 






CO 





^H ' ,^^1"% 


r 


I^Q 


58 


flyi^^i^i 


^. 


/m-'JIL "^5 



I I 



I 

i 


1^ 




\^^ /^^J 




mwB 


i 



CO 
I 




a 






*^ '"' "1"" 


^ "l 












^A - 1 









L 


"1 






i 

L2 


1 J 


1 

! 






""■ ■ "1 


! 


% 


1 1 


i 


-^..^ ^ 


J -> 






These Morgan Designs made in all sizes. 



^V'^^^ A^ 



Home Lighting 



Practical Suggestions for Readers of 

**Building With Assurance" 
By Macbeth-Evans Glass Company, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



T N THE last thirty years great advances have 
^ been made in the development of home 
lighting. Until quite recently the interior 
decorator was forced to plan the furnishing of 
a home in accordance with a pre-arranged 
lighting system, but that time is now past. 
Today we design our lighting in such a way 
that it will bring out the beauties which the 
decorator has so painstakingly planned. A 
great deal might be said on this subject, but 
after all it depends upon each individual case 
what the deciding factors will be. The best 
we can hope for is to lay down a few simple 
rules, or suggest ideas which might be helpful 
in planning the average requirement. 

Home lighting differs from commercial light- 
ing in the same degree that a blueprint is the 
opposite extreme from an artistic painting. In 
our commercial work, the main consideration is 
efficiency. It must be admitted, however, that 
efficiency is also an important factor in home 
illumination, but it must not be the guiding 
rule altogether. Strange to say, illumination 
in the home is the most subtle thing the interior 
decorator has to deal with. Everyone entering 
the house comes under the influence of the 
lighting and this influence is keenly felt. The 
same person might walk into the same home 
at two different times. One time the impres- 
sion of warmth and friendliness and cordiality 
would be given — while under different condi- 
tions of illumination coldness would be ex- 
perienced, creating an unwelcome sensation. 
For this reason, every source of light in a home 
should, in the true sense of the word, make it 
a home and not merely a residing place. 

The most general rule that may be stated is 
to avoid glare. All of us have been exposed. 



not infrequently, to high candle-powered lights 
unprotected by diffusing globes, balls, shades 
or reflectors. To some of us the thought comes 
that this condition is not only wasteful and 
unornamental, but produces restlessness, irrita- 
bility and lack of ease. Therefore, we can 
say at the very beginning, never permit an 
installation which allows the bare filament of a 
lamp to remain exposed within the line of vision. 

In considering home Ughting let us start at 
the entrance. The way in which a porch should 
be illuminated does not seem to be of im- 
portance, but when one considers that such a 
little thing makes the first impression, we should 
give it second thought. Leaded glass of a 
highly diffusing quality, used in conjunction 
with an incandescent lamp of low power, is 
best adapted for such service. In the case of 
porches used constantly during the spring and 
summer months by the family, additional 
lighting is often necessary for reading. There- 
fore, sockets for reading lamps may be con- 
veniently placed and should be considered in 
the original design. As we enter the hall or 
reception room, the light given out by the in- 
stalled unit should give a low intensity, be- 
tween one-half and one foot-candle. Urns'of 
this construction containing whatever design 
suits the fancy of the decorator, hung not lower 
than thirty inches from the ceiling by chains, 
form excellent indirect lighting units. The 
impression given is of warmth and hospitality 
from the very first. 

In the library a centrally located indirect 
bowl, rather shallow so as to give an even dis- 
tribution of light for avoiding objectionable 
shadows, used in conjunction with wall brackets 
and one or two easily adapted table lamps, will 



"^ 



368 



^ 



be a helpful suggestion. The intensity should 
not be less than three foot-candles on the 
reading plane. The ceiling should be light 
but not white, and the same color run down on 
the side wall not lower than two feet. The 
illuminated circle on the ceiling from the in- 
direct unit mentioned should preferably spread 
rather near the cornice but not extend to any 
portion of the side wall. Below this light two- 
foot area, any color of paper, or paint, may be 
used. Those of a lighter hue are recommended. 
In such an installation we see that no light 
source of great luminosity is within the line 
of vision, yet ample illumination is secured 
throughout the entire reading plane to prevent 
undue eye strain. 

In the den the great field for the designer or 
illuminator opens up. Many psychological ex- 
periments have been tried on men who enjoy 
smoking, and it has been found through these 
investigations that unless one can plainly see 
the smoke the pleasure of smoking is marred. 
For this reason dark walls are suggested. 
Portable lamps may be used to great advan- 
tage, and central indirect units, which will be 
turned off more of the time than on, will serve 
for special occasions. 

In the living room one would naturally be 
expected to spend most of the evening hours. 
Because of this it is of paramount importance 
that the lighting should be essentially right. 
The greatest evil possible in such an installa- 
tion would be the maintenance of a light hung 
so low from the ceiling as to be constantly with- 
in the line of vision, or that a bare lamp fila- 
ment remains exposed without the protection 
of some sort of diffusing glass. Upon entering 
a room where these causes are present, one is 
strongly conscious of an uneasiness, but very 
few reaUze just exactly what the evil really is. 
A few minutes after one enters, one is less 
acutely sensitive to the inconvenience caused, 
but nevertheless the physical effects are present 
during the entire stay, in as great a degree as 
during the first few minutes. The living 
room should be essentially homelike. It affords 
the interior decorator opportunities for multi- 
tudes of designs. 



The results may be accomplished in any 
number of ways. In living rooms which are 
long and narrow with medium height ceilings, 
it is well to install two semi-indirect bowls. In 
such a case, this room could be used to serve 
a dual purpose. It can be a living room at 
one end and a library at the other. But where 
the room is small or more nearly square than 
extremely oblong, a central semi-indirect light- 
ing unit, hung not less than eight feet from the 
floor, is very practicable. In the living room, 
as in all other rooms of the home, it is im- 
portant that we should not forget to include 
baseboard outlets to which portable lamps 
may be attached. Well designed wall brackets 
often create the desired atmosphere. 

Before we talk about the kind of light best 
adapted for dining room service, let us first 
trace back a bit to find out something about 
ourselves. Primitive man in all stages of his 
existence reveled in the celebration of his vic- 
tories both of war and of hunt by an extended 
ceremony around the campfire. The red glow 
of its embers seemed to stimulate his soul and 
give him the rest at the completion of his task 
that he had longed for. Try as we may, none 
of us can deny the fact that some of the in- 
stincts of primitive man have been handed 
down to our generation. The low intensities 
of heat and light still subtly charm us. 

How, then, in the light of what we know 
about ourselves, should we light our dining 
room to produce the most pleasing atmosphere? 
This room, of all in the house, should be the 
most attractive. Meal time is the one hour 
when the family gathers together — an hour in 
which everything which is external and harsh 
and abrupt should be eliminated and elements 
introduced which soothe and compose the 
mind. Have you ever been in a dining room 
lighted by candles? Did you note the result, 
especially where the diners were in evening 
dress? The effect is different from anything 
you ever saw before and the light is low and 
warm and soft. It fiickers impulsively with 
every gesture. The people's faces are lighted 
with color that makes them look healthy and 
robust, and there is a sense of well-being under 



=^^69 ^- 



such conditions which, were they otherwise, 
would have just the opposite effect. 

In our modern homes it is not always pos- 
sible to use candle light exclusively in our 
dining rooms, although it is the ideal way, but 
we can approximate it in some degree by care- 
ful choice of the lighting facilities available. 
The first thing to avoid is high intensities of 
light. Gas-filled and tungsten lamps should be 
resorted to only in extreme cases, while carbon 
lamps, giving out a light more similar to that 
of a candle, are best employed. There seems 
to be a tendency now toward the installation 
of semi-indirect lighting bowls over the center 
of the dining room table. If care is used in 
the selection of such a bowl, its proper place- 
ment in relation to ceiling and table, and the 
character and capacity of the lamp, it should 
prove fairly satisfactory. But the most pleas- 
ing effects may be obtained by the employment 
of a dining room dome hung so low that its 
lower edge will be below the eyes of those 
sitting at the table. A thick sheet of ab- 
sorbing and diffusing glass, over which some 
sort of red cloth is placed, may be attached to 
the under surface of the dome — filtering and 
selecting the light which comes from the lamps 
to the table. You will find in such a case that 
the white table cloth and china will reflect just 
enough light adequately to illuminate the 
faces of the diners and this light will not 
produce objectionable and hideous shadows 
underneath the eyes and cheeks such as are 
often produced where a centrally located semi- 
indirect lighting unit is improperly installed. 
In connection with the dome, a few candelabra, 
placed on the mantel or buffet, or suitable wall 
bracket lights will give everyone the impression 
that they are the real source of light and the 
effect spoken of will be produced quite easily. 



Generally speaking, the bedroom is the only 
room in which portable lamps may be used 
exclusively. The number of these depends of 
course upon the size of the room. One is 
usually placed on or near the dressing table, 
on the writing desk and near the bed when no 
night reading lamp is supplied. The latter is 
very convenient as it obviates the necessity for 
groping about in the dark. 

In the bathroom a centrally located en- 
closing globe fitted near the ceiling is often 
erroneously installed. Such an installation 
causes objectionable shadows but if this con- 
dition exists it may be remedied by the addi- 
tion of two wall brackets — ^one on each side of 
the mirror over the wash bowl; but the two 
brackets should always be installed — never one. 
The objection to having only one is the incon- 
venience caused by shadows when shaving. In 
small bathrooms with low ceilings, the most 
practical light is one placed over the center of 
the mirror covered by some type of shade or 
half shell reflecting the light downward on the 
face of the occupant. In such an installation 
both sides of one's face are equally illuminated. 

In the kitchen, as in other rooms, the mis- 
take is very often made of exposing lamps with- 
out reflectors; but in instaUing a reflector we 
should be careful to select one which is easily 
cleaned. Besides the central lighting unit, 
which should be of such a character as to 
produce the minimum shadows, a local light 
should be placed over the sink and drain and 
another over the stove. 

Two lights are generally installed in the 
basement, one just in front of the furnace and 
the other over the laundry. It is advan- 
tageous to install these in separate circuits to 
make it possible for them to be controlled from 
the kitchen as well as from below. 



=^^370 ^ 



Morgan Standardized Mouldings 

rpXTERIOR Mouldings manufactured from green or 
only partially dried lumber will warp, twist and split, 
and will not take paint satisfactorily. Furthermore, will 
always be an eyesore and detract from an otherwise well 
built structure. Interior Mouldings and Trim can mar the 
appearance of a room or add to the impression made by the 
furniture. Splendidly designed furniture, well made, will 
appear only ordinary if the Moulding and Trim are inferior 
in quality and workmanship. To obtain perfect results 
insist upon proper Moulding and Trim. 

With the Morgan Woodwork Organization the designing 
and the making of mouldings is a craft— a science. 

Both exterior and interior mouldings are, by virtue of 
their beauty and adaptability, of the best mediums for the 
expression of an architectural motif. In fact, mouldings 
serve as the frame for the architectural picture and as such 
they must be designed with the utmost regard for symmetry 
and grace. 

But the artistry which is devoted to the designing of 
Morgan mouldings is by no means the only reason they 
enjoy such a widespread use. 

Craftsmanship of the highest order is employed in the 
making of Morgan mouldings. First, the most painstaking 
care is taken that the woods used are of good quality and 
unusually well seasoned to insure weather-resisting dura- 
bility. Second, the machinery employed in their milling is 
of the most expensive and most advanced type, anchored 
to solid foundations so that every foot is manufactured 
with the greatest precision and smoothness. Third, only 
thoroughly experienced workmen, highly skilled in the 
making of mouldings, are employed. 

The designs and patterns shown on the following pages 
comprise what we believe to be the most comprehensive 
line of mouldings presented to the trade. Among them 
may be found exactly the proper one for every use. 



^^^^^ }^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 





i' 



^ ^^^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 




=^^^^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 




M8535 



375 



^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 





!IS«'»"-3»«l- 



M8542 



P 






M8094 








M8554 







^^£1^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 




381 



^^" ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 



M8640 











M822I 




"~^ ^^^ ^^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 






M8424 




M8397 



M8394 


^ 




!J^^^Jl|:l|f|'r|f ; 



384 



-^^'^ ^- 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 









386 



"^-^""^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 




393 



^'^^ ^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 





=^>^395 ,^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 




398 



=\^ -^""^v^ 



MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 




399 



=W-^^ >>^ 






MORGAN STANDARDIZED MOULDINGS 







==\<^402 ,^ 



How to Estimate Building Material 



Excavation 
Excavation for foundations and basements is figured 
by the quantity of cubic yards of earth removed. 

The number of cubic yards is found by multiplying 
the length in feet by the width in feet by the average depth 
in feet and dividing the total by 27, as there are 27 cubic 
feet in 1 cubic yard. 

Concrete 
Foundations, concrete walls and footings are figured in 
cubic feet. The number of cubic feet in footings and walls 
is found by multiplying the length in feet by the width 
in feet by the depth in feet. 

Concrete for walls and footings is usually mixed in the 
follQwing proportions: 

1 part cement, 2 parts sand, 5 parts crushed stone. 
1 cubic yard of concrete work mixed in the above pro- 
portions requires approximately 1 barrel or 4 bags of 
cement, 4/10 of 1 yard of sand, 85/100 of 1 yard of crushed 
stone. 

Brick 
Brick for walls and foundations is estimated by the 
thousand. 

The following table is the rule most commonly recog- 
nized by the building trade to determine the number of 
brick in walls of various thickness, computed on the super- 
ficial foot measure. 
4" wall or ]4 brick in thickness, 1}4 brick per super- 
ficial foot. 

8'' wall or 1 brick in thickness, 15 brick per superficial 
foot. 
12" wall or 1)4 brick in thickness, 223^ brick per super- 
ficial foot. 

16" wall or 2 brick in thickness, 30 brick per superficial 
foot. 

20" wall or 2>^ brick in thickness, 373^ brick per super- 
ficial foot. 

The number of brick in piers of different sizes is based 
on the following table. 

4x8 piers, 4J4 brick per foot in height 

8x8 piers, 9 brick per foot in height 

8x12 piers, 14 brick per foot in height 

12 X 12 piers, 22 brick per foot in height 

12 x 16 piers, 29 brick per foot in height 

16 X 16 piers, 40 brick per foot in height 

The number of brick in flues of different sizes is based 

on the following table. 

Single flue 8x8 inside measurement, 24 brick per foot in 

height. 
Single flue 8 x 12 inside measurement, 28 brick per foot in 

height. 
Single flue 8 x 16 inside measurement, 32 brick per foot in 

height. 
Single flue 12 x 12 inside measurement, 32 brick per foot in 

height. 
Double flues, one 8x8 and one 8x12 inside measurement, 

44 brick per foot in height. 
Double flues, 8 x 12 each inside measurement, 48 brick 
per foot in height. 

Lumber 
Lumber is estimated by the 1,000 square feet, 1" thick, 
but on account of lapping and matching it requires more 
than 1,000 feet of lumber to cover 1,000 square feet of 
surface. 

The following table will show the amount to add to the 
various kinds of material most commonly used. 

Finished 
Width Add 

Boards i%"x. 8" S2S 7M" l/8th 

i^e" X 10" S2S 9M" 1/lOth 

i^le" X 12" S2S IIM" l/12th 



Finished 
Width Add 

Ship Lap 1^6" X 6" 5M" l/5th 

We'^x 8"... IW l/7th 

1^6" X 10" 9Ji" l/9th 

Drop Siding We" x 6" 5M" l/6th 

i3/f6"x8" 7M" l/7th 

Flooring ^" x 3" 2W l/3rd 

J^"x4" 3M" l/4th 

M"x6" 51^" l/5th 

3^"x8" 7W l/7th 

Ceiling % or ^" x 4" 3^" l/4th 

% or %" X 6"..,. 5M" l/5th 

Flooring Ends 

Matched %" x 1^" l/3rd 

3^"x2" l/4th 

^W^IV2 1/2 

I3^f6"x2" 3/'8ths 

i%"x2i^" l/3rd 

Lap Siding J^" x 4" 23^" exposed to ' 

weather 3/8ths 

H"x6" 43^" exposed to 

weather l/4th 

Joists are usually set 16" on centers and require 3 joists 
for every 4 feet. 

Studdings are usually set 16" on centers but owing to 
the many openings and corners where the studs are 
doubled, the universal method is to figure 1 stud for 
every lineal foot of partition. This takes care of the 
openings and corners. 

Wood shingles are estimated on an average width of 
4 inches. 

The following table shows the amounts required per 
square of 100 square feet for different exposures. 

4" exposure 900 shingles 

43^" exposures... 800 shingles 

5" exposures 720 shingles 

6" exposures 600 shingles 

Lath are estimated by the square yard and bought by 
the thousand. It requires 14 lath, %" x l%" x 4'-0" to 
cover 1 square yard of wall surface. 

Plaster 

Plastering is estimated by the square yard. The most 
common plaster at present is what is known as Cement 
Plaster, prepared by plaster manufacturers. Cement 
plaster is supplied in both hair fibred and unfibred — sand 
to be added at the job. 

The following table shows approximately the amount 
of plaster and sand required for the different kinds of 
walls, based on average conditions. 

Cement plaster for 100 square yards of surface 

Brick and 
Plastering Wood Metal Plaster Clay Tile 

Surface Lath Lath Board Walls 

Mixture 1 part 1 part 1 part 1 part 

plaster plaster plaster plaster 

2 parts 2 parts 2 parts 3 parts 

sand sand sand sand 

Pounds 900 to 1700 to 800 to 1400 to 

Plaster 1100 2000 900 1700 
Yards of Sand 1111 

Wood Fibre plaster for 100 square yards of surface 

Brick and 
Plastering Wood Metal Plaster Clay Tile 

Surface Lath Lath Board Walls 

Mixture No sand No sand No sand Equal parts 

sand and 
plaster 
Pounds 1400 to 2200 to 1300 to 1800 to 

Plaster 1700 2700 1600 2000 

Yards of Sand 1 



403 



^^"^ ^ 



Abbreviations of Mill Work and Trade Terms 



All widths.. A. W. 

Apron .Apr. 

Astragal ....Astg. 

Attic Sash Att. S. 

Back Band B. B. 

Balusters Bal. 

Barn Sash B. S. 

Base Bs. 

Base Blocks Bs. BIox. 

Base Moulding Bs. Mldg. 

Beaded & Center Beaded„..B. & C. B. 
Beaded & Center Matched..B. & C. M. 

Bead & Cove B. & C, 

Bead for Glass ...B. for G. 

Better Btr. 

Between Glass Bet. Gl. 

Between Jambs Bet. Jbs. 

Beveled Plate Glass Bev, P. G. 

Bill of Lading B/L 

BHnd ...Bid. 

Blind Stop Bid. St. 

Board Bd. 

Bookcase Bk. Case 

Bottom Bot 

Bottom Rail Bot. Rl. 

Bottom Sash Bot. S. 

Bracket Brkt. 

Breakfast Nook,... Brkft. Nk. 

Brick Opening Br. Opg. 

Brick Veneer .....Br. Ven. 

Buffet Buf. 

Cabinet Cab. 

Cabinet Finish Cab. Fin. 

Carving Carvg. 

Casement Cas. 

Casement Sash Cas. S. 

Casework Caswk. 

Cash on Delivery C. O. D. 

Casing Csg. 

Catalogue Cat. 

Ceiling Clg. 

Cellar Sash Cel. S. 

Chair Rail Ch. Rl. 

Check Rail Ck. Rl. 

China Closet... Ch. CI. 

Circle Head Cir. Hd. 

Circle Top Cir. Top 

Clear Ch-. 

Column Col. 

Common.. Com. 

Composition Compo. 

Construction Constr. 

Corner Bead Cor. Bd. 

Cove & Bead C. & B, 

Cross Panels X Pan. 

Crown Mould Cap C. M. C. 

Cupboard Cup. 

Cypress .....Cyp. 

Delivered ...Del. 

Dimension Dim. 

Dining Room Din. Rm. 

Divided Div. 

Door Dr. 

Dormer Dorm. 

Double Dbl. 

Double Acting D. A. 

Double Beaded DbL Bd. 

Double Thick D. T. 

Drawers Drws. 

Dressed & Headed D. & H. 

Dressed & Matched D. & M. 

Dressed,Matched & BeadedD. M. & Bd. 



Dresser Dres. 

Drip Cap D. C. 

Embossed Emb. 

Enclosures Enc. 

Entrance Ent. 

Expense Bill E/B 

Exterior Ext. 

Face Measure Face Meas. 

Feet Ft. 

Finished Size Fin. S. 

Flat Panel F. P. 

Florentine Flor. 

Floor Fir. 

Flour Bin ,F1. B. 

Flush Mould.......... F. M. 

Frame Fra. 

Free on Board F. O. B. 

Freight Frt. 

French Door Fn Dr. 

French Sash..... Fr. S. 

Front Front 

Glass or Glaze Gl. 

Grade of Window Glass D. S. A. 

Grade of Window Glass.. ...D. S. A. A. 

Grade of Window Glass D. S. B. 

Grade of Window Glass.. ...,S. S. A. 

Grade of Window Glass S. S. B. 

Grained .Grd. 

Head Casing H. Csg. 

High Hi. 

Hip Raised Panel H. R. P. 

House Hse. 

Inside Ins. 

Interior Int. 

Ironing Board Irg. Bd. 

Jambs .Jbs. 

Kiln Dried Kin. D. 

Knock Down K. D. 

Laminated Lam. 

Lattice Lat. 

Light Lt. 

Lineal Lin. 

Lining Lng. 

Living Room Liv. Rm. 

Lock Rail L. RL 

Lumber ...Lbr. 

Machine Sanded Mch. Sand. 

Material Mat. 

Medicine Case....... .M. C. 

Meeting Rail Mt. Rl. 

Millwork Millwk. 

Mill Run M. R. 

Mirror Mir. 

Morgan ....M. 

Moulding Mldg. 

Mullion Mul. 

O Gee (Style of Sticking).... O. G. 

One Side 1/S. 

One Thousand M. 

Opening Opg. 

Outside O/S 

Outside Opening , O/S Opg. 

Painted Ptd. 

Pair Pr. 



Pedestal Ped. 

Pergola Perg. 

Picture Mould Pet. Mo. 

Pilaster Pil. 

Plain Glass PI. Gl. 

Plain Plate Glass PL P. GL 

Plain Rail PL RL 

Plain Sawed Red Oak P. R. Oak 

Plain Sawed White Oak W. Oak 

Pockets and Pulleys P. & P. 

Poplar Pop. 

Pulley Stile P. S. 

Quantity Quan. 

Quarter Round Qr. Rd. 

Quarter Sawed Qr, S. 

Queen Anne Q. A. 

Rabbetted Rabt. 

Radiator Cover Rad. Cov. 

Rafter Ends Raf. E. 

Rail RL 

Raised Mould ..R. Mo. 

Raised Panels R, P. 

Rift Sawed Rft. S. 

Ripping Size Rip. S. 

Rolling Slats R. S, 

Room Rm. 

Sash Opening S. Opg. 

Segment Head Seg. Hd, 

Segment Top Seg. Top 

Select SeL 

Shingle ShgL 

Sideboard Sdbd. 

SideUghts Sdlts. 

Single Sgl. 

Single Thick S. T. 

Sized Szd. 

Sliding Sldg. 

Square Sq. 

Stationary Slat S. S. 

Sticking Stkg, 

Stile St, 

Stock Stk. 

Stool StL 

Storm Door St. Dr. 

Storm Sash. St. S. 

Surfaced Four Sides S 4/S 

Surfaced One Side S 1/S 

Surfaced 1 Side and 1 Edge..S 1/S& 1/E 
Surfaced Two Sides ....S 2/S 

Thick. Tk. 

Threshold.... ..Thrsh. 

Tongued & Grooved T. & G . 

Transom Trans. 

Transom Bar T. B. 

Trellis....; TreL 

Unselected Birch Uns. Bir. 

Veneered Ven. 

Vestibule Vest. 

Wainscot Cap Wains. Cap 

Water Closet W. C, 

Western Pine W. P, 

White Cedar Wh. Cedar 

White Pine White P, 

Whitewood W. W. 

Window Wd. 

Work Table Wk. T. 

Yellow Pine Y. P. 



^^404^ 



Alphabetical Index of Special Articles 



Art Glass.. 



Page 
...357 



Bathroom... 173, 182-184 

Bedroom 166 

Bookcases 185 

Breakfast Nook 132 

Colonnade 94 

Cozy Corners 185 

Decoration 92-93 

Dining Room HI 

Door Differences 216-217 

Finishes and Paints 291-292 

Finishes, Modern Wood 287-292 

Fireplaces 185 

Floors^ 354-355 

Furniture 139-154 



Guarantee, Morgan.. 



Page 
.23, 293 



Garages.. 



..344 



Halls 79 

Hardware 294-295 

Heating 199-205 

Home 3,48-51 

Kitchen 159 

Landscape 348-350 

Lighting 368-370 

Linen Cabinets 211 

Living Room 83 

Lumber and Its Uses... 206 

Mirror Door 272 

Mouldings 371 

Paints and Finishes 291-292 

Paneling, Wall 207 

Pantry Cases 211 

Plan Suggestions 22 



Porch.... 334 

Radiator Covers 185 

Reception Halls 79 

Stairways 68 

Suggestions: 

Estimating Building Material 403 

Storm Doors and Sash 317 

Substitution 110 

Wall Sockets, Electric 82 

Wider Doors 52 

Woman's Thoughts About a 
Home 8-20 

Vestibule 67 

Wardrobes 211 

Window Seats..... 185 

Window Troubles 296 

Woodwork 286 



Alphabetical Index of Mouldings 



Page 

Apron 383 

Astragal 401 

Back Band 390-391 

Baluster 402 

Band Strip 401 

Base ...384, 392, 396, 397 

Base Mould 396 

Batten Strip 380 

Bed Mould 375-376 

Blind Stop 398 

Brick Mould 375, 400 

Burlap Strips 377, 382 

Cap 393-395 

Cap Mould 393-395 

Casing 382, 384, 388-392 

Chafing Strips 401 

Chair Rail 382 

Chalk Rail 402 

Corner Bead 380, 383 

Cove Mould 376 

Cove and Bead Moulding 379 



Page 
Crown Mould... 372-374 

Drip Cap ...377 

Door Stop 378, 379 

Embossed Mould 395 

Fillet 393-395 

Frieze Mould ....380 

Glass Beads... 379 

Half Round 376 

Head Casing 393-395 

Hook Strip 382 

Jamb Lining... 384 

Lattice .377 

Neck Mould 393-395 

Nosing 380,382 

Panel Mould 381 



Page 

Panel Strip 377, 382, 384 

Parting Strip 398, 400 

Partition Parts 387 

Picture Mould 383 

Pulley Stile 398, 400 

Quarter Round 378 

Scotia Mould 376 

Screen Mould 376, 380 

Screen Stock 380 

Shelf Cleats 383 

Shoe Mould..... 396-397 

Sill Stock ..398-399 

Sprung Mould 372-376, 381 

Square Members 384 

Stool .385-386 

Stop 378-379 

Thresholds 387 

Wainscot Cap 382 

Water Table 377, 398 

Window Stop 378, 379, 398, 400 



Numerical Index of Mouldings 



Design No. Size 

M-8000 r^W- 

M-8002 rx3r.. 

M-8003 r^2r.. 

M-8004 rx5r.. 

M-8005 rx4r.. 

M-8006 rx4J".. 

M-8007 rxlf".. 

M-8008 rx2i".. 

M-8009 rx3r.. 

M-8010 r X 21". 373 

M-8011 r X 2r 373 

M-8012 rx4i" 373 

M-8013 rx4f" 373 

M-8014 rx3i"... 373 

M-8015 F'xl" 375 

M-8016 r X ir 375 

M-8017 rxir 375 

M-8018 f " x 2i" .....374 

M-8019 r X 2|" 374 



Page No. 

372 

372 

...372 

372 

372 

372 

373 

373 

373 



Design No. Size Page No. 

M-8020 f"x3i" 374 

M-8021 rx4F..... 374 

M-8023 rx3r 374 

M-8024 rxir 376 

M-8025 rx2i" 376 

M-8026 rx2r - 376 

M-8029 rx3r 376 

M-8030 r X 2r 375 

M-8031 r X W -.375 

M-8032 r^2' 375 

M-8033 i" x 2r 375 

M-8035 rx r 375 

M-8036 rxir 375 

M-8037 irxir ..375 

M-8038 ir X ir 375 

M-8042 Fx r 375 

M-8045 r X ir 375 

M-8046 ..ir X ir 375 

M-8048 ir X 2" 375 



Page No. 

..380 
.376 
.376 
.376 



Design No. Size 

M-8051 l"x r.. 

M-8059 rx V- 

M-8060... rx r- 

M-8061 rxir- 

M-8063 rx r 378,402 

M-8064 rx r 378,387 

M-8065 rx r 378,396 

M-8067 rxir 378 

M-8075 r X W 376 

M-8076 Hq' X r 376 

M-8077 rx^He" 376 

M-8078 rxl" 376 

M-8079 rxir 376 

M-8080 rxir 376 

M-8082 rx r 378 

M-8083 rxir 378 

M-8084 r X ir..378, 398, 400 

M-8085 rxir 378 

M-8086 rxir 378 



^^405^ 



Numerical Index of Mouldings— Con^i/iued 



Design No. Size 

M-8089 rx 

M-8090 i"x 

M-8091 i"x 

M-8093..... i"x 

M-8094 ^"x 

M-8095 Fx 

M-8096 i'x 

M-8097 ^"x 

M-8098 i"x 

M-8115 i"x 

M-8116 rx 

M-8117 i"x 

M-8118 ^"x 

M-8119 J"x 

M-8120 r'x 

M-8123 |"x 

M-8124. li"x 

M-8125 If'x 

M-8132 %"x 

M-8133 f'x 

M-8139 ^6"x 

M-8140 rx 

M-8141 W^ 

M-8142 ili^'x 

M-8145 rx 

M-8146 .^e'x 

M-8161 rx 

M-8167 rx 

M-8168 rx 

M-8174 rx 

M-8177 rx 

M-8178 %''x 

M-8180 fVx 

M-8221 rx 

M-8238 irx 

M-8242 rx 

M-8256 li"x 

M-8262 rx 

M-8263 rx 

M-82631 rx 

M-8264 rx 

M-8265 rx 

M-8267 li"x 

M-82671 rx 

M-8269 ...irx 

M-82691 irx 

M-8271 rx 

M-8273 rx 

M-8278 rx 

M-8280... ^e'x 

M-8281 ^6"x 

M-8282 ^s'^x 

M-8283.. irx 

M-82831 Hxfe'^x 

M-8284 irx 

M-8285 irx 

M-8286... ..irx 

M-8287 irx 

M-8289 rx 

M-8290 rx 

M-8308 r X 

M-8309 rx 

M-8310 rx 

M-8311 rx 



ir.. 
ir- 
ir- 
2r.. 

1 7ff 
Xg .. 
15// 
J-8 •• 
1 3V 
J- 8 ■ 

W- 

1 3ff 
±8 .. 
1 j5'/ 
-l-S ■■ 

If".. 
li".. 

11'-' 
l& ■• 
11" 
J-S •• 
15// 
-Ls ■ 

2" .. 

2r-- 



ir- 
ir- 



ir.. 
ir.. 

15'/ 

2" .. 
2" .. 

91" 

-^2 ■■ 
01'/ 
^8 ■ 
1 2-'^ 
±8 .. 
17// 
Ig .. 
15// 
Ig •• 
13// 
I4 .. 

If".. 
If".. 

13// 
I4 .. 
1 31' 
A 4 .. 
05// 
^8 ■■ 

31".. 
4i".. 
3J",. 

13// 
I4 ., 

2i".. 

3r.. 
ir.. 
ir. 
ir.. 
ir- 
ir- 

2" .. 

2r.. 

3" .. 

31".. 

4r.. 

4r.. 

35// 
8 ■■ 



Page No. 

378 



378 

378 

379 

379 

379 

379 

......379 

378 

378 

378 

378 

378 

378 

378 

380 

380 

.380 

380 

...380 

380 

380 

380 

380 

380 

380 

381 

381 

381 

381 

381 

381 

381 

382 

383 

383 

382 

....383 

383 

383 

383 

..383 

386 

386 

386 

386 

387 

387 

.......387 

377 

377 

377 

377 

........377 

377 

377 

377 

377 

388 

388 

382, 388, 391 

4r 388,391 

4r 388 

5i" .....388 



Design No. Size 

M-8341 rx4r... 

M-8342 rx4f^.., 

M-8358 rx3r-- 

M-8359 rx4r... 

M-8368 irxl^fe".. 

M-8374 ...irxir... 

M-8378 irxir... 

M-8378^ 13^6" xlW-. 

M-8384 rx4i"... 

M-8385 rxsr... 

M-8386 rx7r... 

M-8387 irx 15^6".. 

M-8389..... irxir- 

M-8393 irx2r... 

M-8394 rx4r.- 



M-8395 %"xir-. 

M-8396 irx2r.- 

M-8397 rx5" .. 

M-8399 irx2r.. 

M-8400 irx 5" .. 

M-8401 irx 21".. 

M-8403 Wxir-- 

M-8404 rx r.. 

M-8410.... 



M-8413 rx 

M-8414 r^2ir 

M-8415 rx7r 

M-8420 rx2i" 

M-8421 rx7i" 

M-8422 rx r, 

M-8424 rx7r 

M-8426 rx7i" 

M-8430 rxir 

M-8431 rx4r 

M-8432 rx r 

M-8439 irx 4" , 

M-8440 rx5i 



M-8441 li' 

M-8443 f 



x2" 

x4r 



M-8444 rx4i 



'x2| 
'x2| 



M-8446 li' 

M-8450 li 

M-8450-A rx2| 

M-8520 rx2" 

M-8530 rx r 

M-8531 rxl" , 

M-8532 r^2'' . 

M-8533 rx2ir 

M-8535 rx r 

M-8540 rxli" 

M-8541 

M-8542 rxli 

M-8543 rxir 

M-8544 rx2r 

M-8560 rx r 

M-8561 rx r 

M-8562 rx J" 

M-8563 ¥^^^46" 

M-8564 W^W 

M-8567 Ii"x7r 

M-8567i Wx7i" 

M-8568 i^6"x3r 

M-8570 rx%" 



Page No. 

389 



..390, 



..389 
..390 
..390 
..390 
..390 
.391 
.391 
.392 
..392 
..392 
393 
..393 
..393 
..384, 393, 
394, 400 

393 

393 

.384, 395 

394 

394 

394 

.394, 395 
.394 



.irx2r - ...395 

395 

...396 

396 

396 

396 

.396, 397 
.384, 397 

397 

398 

398 

..398, 400 
399 



399 

400 

400 

400 

401 

401 

401 

..374 

376 

376 

376 

376 

375 

379 

rxir 379 



.379 
.379 
.379 
.379 
.379 
.379 
.379 
.379 

.385 
.385 
.383 

.379 



Design No. Size Page No. 

M-8571 rx r 379 

M-8598 r X 3r 385 



M-8599 J"x2r., 

M-8600 rxir.. 

M-8610 rx r.- 

M-8611 rx f".. 

M-8613 rxir.. 

M-8614 rxir.. 

M-8615 r^2ir. 



M-8619 
M-8620 
M-8621 
M>8623 



r.. 



X 

X i". 

X ir 

y Ql// 

M-8624 rx2r 

M-8625 rx2§", 

M-8626 f"x3" 

M-8628 rx2r 

M-8629 rx2r 

M-8635 rx2ir 

M-8636 rx3r. 

M-8638 Ii*x7r. 

M-8640 r X 3r-.382, 388, 391 

M-8641 f " X 3r 383 

M-8642 rx3f" 383 



385 
380 
.380 
380 
.380 
,380 
,380 
.381 
381 
,381 
.381 
.381 
.382 
.382 
.382 
.382 
,382 
382 
386 



M-8643 rxSir. 

M-8655 %"xir.. 

M-8656 rx2r.. 

M-8657 rx2r.. 

M-8660 rx2r.. 

M>8667 rx2r.. 

M-8695 irx3i".. 

M-8696 ..,.irx2r.. 

M-8699 rx5i".. 

M-8700 rx3r 



.383 
..384 
..384 
..384 
.384 
..382 
.387 
..387 
.381 
.387 



M-8705 rx4r-.384, 389, 391 



M-8706 rx4i".. 

M-8707 rx4r.- 

M-8711 rx3r.. 

M-8712 rx3r.. 

M-8713 li"xli".. 

M-8716.. 



3// Y Si" 

M-8717 Z rx3|".. 

M~8721..., "" ~ 

M-8722.... 



,.irx2" 
1-" X 5" 

M-8740 '. |"xlf'^ 

M-8741 r^SV'.. 

M-8790 rx7r.. 

M-8828 rx7r-. 

M-8840 Ii*x4r.. 

M-8850 rx2r-. 

M-8851 irx 21".. 

M-8855 rx4r-- 

M-8865.. rx4i^. 

M-8875 irx2r- 

M-8876.. '"" "'" 



.389, 



M-8890. ....5/f6"x2r.. 

M-8891 ..5/i6"xl|".. 

M-8900 :.,..ir'xli".. 



M-8901. 



-*^8 



M-8902.: If 



'xl| 
'xl| 
'xir 

xir 
.'x2r 

M-8922 rx2f" 



M-8903.. 
M-8920.. 
M~8921.. 



.389 
.389 
.390 
.390 
.391 
.392 
392 
.395 
.395 
.396 
.396 
.397 
.397 
.398 
.398 
.398 
.399 
.400 
.401 

.irx2r 401 

" "" ~- ..401 

..401 
..402 
..402 

.402 
,.402 

,402 
,.^02 

.402 



X^Q^^ 



Page 

Accordion French Doors 158 

Angle Newels 325 

Art Glass 358-367 

Balusters: 

Porch 342 

Stair ; 326 

Base Blocks 327 

Bathroom Cases 174-181 

Bathroom Scenes 19, 173-178 

Beam Ceiling.. 327 

Bedroom Scenes 17, 166-172 

Blinds 320-321 

Bookcases 187-190, 192-193 

Bookcase Colonnade 97-99, 102-107 

Brackets: 

Exterior 343 

Stair...:^ 322 

Branches of Morgan Woodwork Or- 
ganization 2 

Breakfast Nooks 15, 132-137 

Broom Case 165 

Cased Opening 100-101, 133-136 

Casement Sash 312-313 

Casework: 

Bathroom Cases 174-181 

Bookcases 187-190, 192-193 

Broom Case 165 

Buffets 119<-120, 124-125, 130-131 

Cased Opening 100-101 

China Case 129 

Closet Cases 212-215 

Colonnades 94-108 

Cozy Corners 194-196 

Fireplaces 186-190 

Ironing Board 165 

Kitchen Cases 160-165 

Linen Cases 174-178, 213 

Mantelshelves 191 

Medicine Cases 174-181 

Pantry Cases 214-215 

Radiator Covers 196-198 

Seats 186, 188-189, 194-196 

Sideboards 12M23, 126-128 

Wardrobes.. 212 

Ceiling Beams. 327 

Cellar Frame... 329 

Cellar Sash 310 

China Case 129 

China Case Colonnade 103, 107 

Circle Top Frames 330 

Circle Top Sash 330 

Circle Top Transom 316 

Clocks, Hall 109 

Closet Cases 212-215 

Clothes Chute Door 177-178, 181 

Colonnades 95-108 

Bookcase ..97-99, 102-107 

China Case 103, 107 

Colonial 95 

Writing Desk 102 

Colonial Doors 232-233, 260-261 

Color Schemes 148-149, 152-153 

Colonial Illustrations: 

Art Glass 358-362 

Bathroom 19 

Bedroom... 17 

Breakfast Nook 15 

Dining Room 13 

Door Inlays 284-285 

Entrance of a Home 5 

Frontispiece 3 

Homes 24-47 

Kitchen 21 

Library 11 

Living Room 9 



General Index 

Page 

Colonial Illustrations — Continued 

Paint Finishes 288-289 

Reception Hall 7 

Columns, Porch 341 

Combination Storm & Screen Doors 

317-318 

Construction: 

Column 341 

Door 216-217,274-275 

Frame 328-329 

Copyright 2 

Cottage Sash 309 

Cottage Windows 307-308 

Cozy Corner Seats 194-196 

Dining Room Scenes 13, 111-118 

Divided Top Windows 298-307 

Dormers 332-333 

Doors: 

Accordion French 158 

Clothes Chute 177-178, 181 

Colonial 232-233, 260-261 

Construction of 216-217, 274-275 

Exterior 53-66, 218-251, 280-283 

Flush 274-283 

French 

155-158, 231, 248-251, 262-265 

Garage 347 

Gum Panel 266 

Inlaid 277-279, 284-285 

Interior 252-269, 276-279 

Mirror 273 

Sidelights 53-66,270-271 

Sticking, Style of 217 

Storm 317-318 

Door Finishes 288-292 

Door Sticking, Style of 217 

Dressing Table 175 

Double Hung Windows.. 297-311 

Dowels, Wedge 217 

Editors, Names of Co-operators 4 

Enclosures, Radiator 196-198 

Ends, Rafter. 343 

Entrances, Doors 53-66 

Entrance Frames 53-66 

Exterior Doors.53-66, 218-251, 280-283 

Fences 352-253 

Finishes, Door.. ^.290 

Fireplaces 186-190 

Flooring 356 

Flower Boxes 331 

Flush Doors 274-283 

Frames: 

Circle Top 330 

Gable 330 

Frames, Section of 328-329 

French Doors 

155-158, 231, 248-251, 262-265 

French Doors, Accordion 158 

Front Entrances 53-66 

Gable Brackets 343 

Gable Frames 330 

Garages 345-346 

Garage Doors 347 

Gates 353 

Glass: 

Art 358-365 

Leaded Bevel Plate.. 367 

Leaded Double Strength 366 

Glossary 404 

Gum Panel Doors 266 

Hall Clocks 109 

Halls, Reception 7, 80-81 



Page 

Hardware 294-295 

Home Designs 24-47 

Illustrations, Colored 

3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 

21, 24-47, 284-285, 288-289, 358-362 

Inlays, Flush Door 277-279, 284-285 

Interior Doors 252-269, 276-279 

Ironing Board 165 

Kitchen Cases 160-165 

Kitchen Scenes ...21, 159-163 

Landing Newels 325 

Leaded Art Glass 358-367 

Library Scene 11 

Linen Cases 174-178, 213 

Living Rooms 9, 84-91 

Mantelshelves .186-191 

Medicine Cabinets 174-181 

Mirrors 175, 178 

Mirror Door 273 

Morgan Woodwork Organization 

Branches 2 

Moulding, Morgan Standardized...... 

372-402 

Newels: 

Angle Stair 325 

Landing Stair 325 

Porch 341 

Starting Stair 323-324 

Nooks, Breakfast 15, 132-137 

Openings, Cased... ...100-101, 133-136 

Panel Doors: 

Exterior 232-233 

Interior 252-261, 266-269 

Panel Wainscoting 207-210 

Pantry Cases 214-215 

Pergolas 351 

Plans, House 24-47 

Plinth Blocks 327 

Porches 334-340 

Porch, Sun 138 

Porch work: 

Balusters 342 

Brackets 343 

Columns 341 

Column Construction ...341 

Newels 341 

Posts 341 

Rails 342 

Preface Q 

Quarter Round 378 

Radiator Covers 196-198 

Rafter Ends 343 

Rails: 

Porch 342 

Stair 326 

Reception Halls 7, 80-81 

Room Beams ...327 

Room Paneling.. 207-210 

Sash: 

Casement 312-313 

Cellar... 310 

Circle Top 316, 330 

Cottage 309 

Gable 330 

Queen Anne 314-316 

Storm 319 

Transom ...314-315 



^j^Li^ 



Page 

Sash Doors: 

Exterior ...218-231, 234-251 

Flush, Exterior 280-283 

Flush, Interior 279 

Interior.. ..253, 255, 257-258, 262-265 
Scenes' 

Bathroom 19, 174-178 

Bedroom 17, 167-172 

Breakfast Nook 15, 133-137 

Dining Room 13, 111-118 

Kitchen 21, 160-163 

Library..... 11 

Living Room.. 9, 84-91 

Reception Hall 7, 80-81 

Seats 186, 188-189, 194-196 

Shutters and Blinds 320-321 

Sideboards 121-123, 126-128 

Sidelights 53-66, 270-271 



General Index— Continued 

Page 

Specifications for Modern Door Fin- 
ishes 290 

Square Stair Balusters 326 

Sun Porch .....138 

Stained Glass 358-362 

Stair: 

Balusters 326 

Brackets 322 

Fillet 322,326 

Newels 323-325 

Parts 322-326 

Rail 326 

Shoe 322,326 

Stairways 68-78 

Sticking, Door 217 

Storm Doors, Combination 317-318 

Storm Sash 319 

Table, Dressing 175 



Page 

Transoms 314-315 

Turned Balusters 326 

Wall Paneling 208-210 

Wardrobes 212 

Wedge Dowel, Morgan 217 

Windows 297-311 

Cottage 307-308 

Divided Top 298-307 

Double Hung 297-311 

Eight Light 311 

Four Light 310 

Leaded Glass 308 

Twelve Light 311 

Two Light ..297 

Window Seats 194, 196 

Window Troubles, How to Avoid 

Them .....296 

Writing Desk 102. 192 



1 I 



408 « 



^